What are you reading in July?

Annie Deighnaugh

I just finished Watchers by Koontz. One of the great American read list. It was good summer reading, but typical of the genre....suspense/thriller...which required a good dose of disbelief. But considering it was written in the 80s, the story line of a genetically modified dog has held up pretty well. But don't expect great character development or anything.

I have a number on the list to read soon:

  • The Crate by Levison which is supposed to be an interesting true story of holocaust survivors.
  • The Lilac Girls which I need to finish before the end of the month when I plan to go visit the house that inspired the book.

What's on your summer read list?

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Janie

I loved, loved, loved Watchers! I read it many years ago and remember it fondly!

I just this morning finished an old James Patterson which I found in a local lending library - I somehow missed it over the years - The Midnight Club. written in 1989. Loved it.

We're in a complicated state of flux right now so I don't have anything on my reading list, I'll just play it one book at a time, when I have the opportunity to read. Thank you Annie for the recommendation of The Crate.

Edited to say thanks to Annie, I have just finished with Amazon One Click and ordered The Crate, White Rose Black Forest and Before We Were Yours :)

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Annie Deighnaugh

Janie, the reason why I want to read The Crate soon is that a local library is having the author speak about the book at the end of the month....sounds very interesting.

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Bookwoman

Just started The Red Daughter, by John Burnham Schwartz, a lightly fictionalized account of Svetlana Alliluyeva (Stalin's daughter) and her defection to the US. So far it's excellent.

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Jasdip

I've only read one Dean Koontz book and that was decades ago. It has a picture of a wolf/panther some animal with a human head if I remember. A man changes into a predatory creature.

That was too far-out for me, and I don't like sci-fi, so I've never read another of his. I assume they're all like that.

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caflowerluver

Just finished NOS4A2 (or NOS4R2) by Joe Hill, all 700 pages. It holds your interest till the end. I could read 50-100 pages at a time. Well written and moves pretty fast. The reviews on Goodreads are mainly favorable. The book is a lot better than the TV show on AMC.

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Janie

Jas, I would venture to say that Watchers is a bit of a 'different' sci-fi/thriller than others by Koontz. It has humor and real heart. And if you are a dog lover, especially Golden Retrievers, than its a must read :) Just as an fyi, here is a review that I liked and snagged from Amazon -

Loved this book when it was written and loved it all over again when I purchased it on my Kindle. Delightfully scary, touching, profound, funny, mesmerizing book whose characters will pull on your heart strings and stay with you forever! Einstein AKA fur face is the best fictional dog I've ever met - he defines "Unforgettable". Everything Koontz says in his afterward is true because I've had the same conversations with my fellow readers about Watchers many of whom are now also planning to go back and revisit. This is Koontz at his best and a classic! And if wishes were horses...there would someday be a sequel!

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Janie

I have to stop reading this thread now because I have just added to my Amazon order with NOS4A2 and then I went to the list that Annie first mentioned that I didn't know about - Great American Read List - and so I also added A Prayer For Owen Meaney (which is something that's been on my list for quite a few years). My book budget is depleted :)

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Annie Deighnaugh

Janie...I use the libraries...much less expensive!

A Prayer for Owen Meany is one of my favorite books ever.

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Jasdip

I'm reading a lot these days, mostly light reading (romance, kind of thing) and suspense.

I did read a John Grisham novel........The King ofTorts which was excellent. It's not new, but certainly new to me.

Our city has adopted Little Libraries. People build wee wooden 'houses' on stakes in front of their home and people can feel free to take a book and leave a book. All free and it gets people out and about in the neighbourhoods. I've accumulated and passed on a number of books this way. Often, when I go to the library, I don't know what I want, and this way I see at a glance what interests me.

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Janie

Oh Annie, I use the library too but sometimes I just lose control with Amazon One Click.

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Kathsgrdn

My Grandmother Told Me to Tell You She's Sorry. It's okay, almost finished with it.

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jewels_ks

I read Before the Fall and I really liked it so I checked out two more books by Noah Hawley. I just got back from a trip to Florida and finished The Good Father. I have one more of his to read and it is titled A Conspiracy of Tall Men. My daughter is a fan of the show Bones and Noah Hawley was a writer on that show.

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chisue

About to start a new Anne Perry "Triple Jeopardy".

Enjoyed "The Spies of Shilling Lane" by Jennifer Ryan. Give it some time. It'll grow on you.

Philip Kerr's final book, "Metropolis" was too grim for me -- too similar to today. (Does anyone know when he died or cause of death? Not an old man. We'll miss his character, Bernie Gunther.)

We have Kate Atkinson's latest on hold: "Big Sky".

I thought "Lilac Girls" was only so-so. Wait, maybe it was her other one...

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crazybrunette64

Kathsgrdn - I thought that book was just so-so until the very end, where I fell in love with it. I now have Britt-Marie was Here in my TBR pile.


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stacey_mb

I also love A Prayer for Owen Meany - one of John Irving's best books, IMHO. I'm just getting ready to read Becoming by Michelle Obama and just finished On the Bright Side : The New Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen, 85 Years Old translated from Dutch. Groen is a pseudonym and this is his second book. He describes his first book as "There's not one sentence that's a lie, but not every word is true." Both of his books, funny and poignant, are about Hendrik Groen and his life in a seniors' residence.

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socks

If you don't mind used books, check out thriftbooks.com or discoverbooks.com. My library doesn't have everything, so sometimes I buy. The library also has a good donated book store which is another source, and Overdrive to borrow on Kindle, but I never seem to get lucky there.

I just finished an older book by David Benioff, City of Thieves (Russia in WWII, Germans invading). Very good, so I ordered his other book.

Just started The Other Americans by Laila Lalami.

Thanks, Annie. I added a couple books to my list as well.

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chisue

"City of Thieves" is one of my all-time favorites! The part about discovering the officer frozen upright in the snow is stuck in my brain. How can we think about eggs the same way after reading this -- and "Angela's Ashes"?

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Rusty

I just finished "The Other Woman" by Sandie Jones. Not a genre I usually read, so I was surprised to find myself having trouble putting it down.

I read "A Prayer for Owen Meany" years ago, and loved it. Read "The Lilac Girls" last year, and right now I can't remember anything about it.

Think I've read all of John Grisham's books, and liked most of them. But to me, his first one was his best one.

I use the library almost exclusively now. I used to buy books at garage sales, estate sales, etc., but I rarely go to them anymore. Half Price Books is a favorite haunt when I get chance to go there, which isn't often as it is 50 miles from my town. And let's face it, the budget and space can only handle so many books! ;^)

Rusty

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socks

Chisue, glad someone else here enjoyed City of Thieves. I had no idea Russians suffered so during the war. Benioff hasnt written many books but was involved in Game of Thrones screenplays.

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Bookwoman

socks, here's a great chart showing deaths in WWII. Some of the numbers are staggering, but none more so than the USSR: https://www.nationalww2museum.org/students-teachers/student-resources/research-starters/research-starters-worldwide-deaths-world-war

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salonva

I used to be an avid contributor to these monthly threads, but since about early to mid June, I have not been able to really get into a book. I started The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane, which I thought was pretty good, but it's me. I just let too much time go by and now I don't remember what was going on. I tried a few other books, and I just cannot seem to read lately and it's really not sitting well with me.

I will definitely give Tea Girl another try in a few months maybe - just hoping I find something and go full steam ahead.

Searching searching.

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Fun2BHere

I haven't been reading as much lately as I have been watching YouTube videos on alternative lifestyles. The two that are interesting to me are Sailing La Vagabonde and Eamon & Bec. I'll never watch all of their videos; I pick and choose from the 2019 list.

Recent books I have read are The Bomb Maker by Thomas Perry (3 stars), Johnny Carson by Henry Bushkin (3 stars) and Four Seasons in Rome: On Twins, Insomnia & the Biggest Funeral in the History of the World by Anthony Doerr (3 stars). Star rating is from one to five with five being outstanding.

I'm looking forward to the next stand-alone novel by Nora Roberts, Under Currents, due out July 9.

I also have a Kindle First book on hand, Relative Fortunes by Marlowe Benn, and another library book recommended by a friend, Cure for the Common Breakup by Beth Kendrick. I haven't started either of those yet.

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nickel_kg

stacey, I just reserved both Hendrik Groen books at the library. I like memoirs of everyday people.

I recently enjoyed "The World According to Fannie Davis: My Mother's Life in the Detroit Numbers" -- written by Fannie's daughter, Bridgett. Bridgett and I were born close in time, and it was interesting comparing her childhood with mine. So similar, so different.

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stacey_mb

Nickel - the Hendrik Groen books are considered to be fiction, since the actual author (he doesn't disclose his name) is much younger than 85 and I don't believe he lives in a retirement home. However, I thought that the books were a pretty accurate representation of someone finding themselves in this living situation and the situations and people that must be encountered. These are voices not often heard, whether via fiction or nonfiction.

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Annie Deighnaugh

Right now I'm reading My Ex-Life for book club. I'll let you know what I think and how the discussion goes.


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nickel_kg

stacey, thanks for the clarification. Still sounds like something I'd like to read, so I'm looking forward to it.

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Diane in MO Bootheel

Just yesterday I turned the last page of Stephen King’s novel, 11/22/63. Amazon had over 3000 positive reviews. It did not disappoint, couldn’t put down. Stephen King The Stand is up next but I need to get a few chores done around here before I order just in case it’s another “can’t put it down”.

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Janie

I could not put down The Stand. Twas a long time ago, but I still have visions when I drive through the Lincoln Tunnel. Loved :)

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socks

Salonva, I’m sorry to hear of your troubles reading. Have you had your eyes checked recently? I vaguely recall reading that people with dry eye read slower so maybe you lose interest before you get into a book.

Not sure of your age of course, but as we age vision changes. Larger print books and good contrast between the typeface and color of the pages helps. I buy used books but not ones with yellowed pages or tiny print. Read in the best light. Maybe you have other things on your mind? Maybe try a few short stories?

PS I recall liking Hummingbird Lane but it was long.


Bookwoman, thank you. Appalling—what we do to ourselves.

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tackykat

I am reading Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou. The story of Theranos and its founder Elizabeth Holmes, who I believe is set to go to trial next year. I have not read too much on the Internet about it but I plan to after finishing the book.

Book was recommended by my niece who works for a big pharmaceutical company. The author is a WSJ reporter.

I am 72 pages in and so far, this true story is more frightening and gripping to me than many fiction books.

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marylmi

I have been trading books all summer with a friend. I get some good ones at the Dollar Store. I just finished Tuesdays with Morrie : An old Man, a young Man, and Life's Greatest Lessons. Before that it was Light of Paris. Now I'm reading To Kill A Mockingbird again as it has been years since first reading it.

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Bookwoman

tackykat, there is a very good HBO documentary based on that book, called The Inventor, which came out earlier this year. It makes for fascinating viewing.

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Alisande

I'm reading The Great Alone, by Kristin Hannah. The library gave me a new copy of the hardcover as a gift when I did a program for their Senior Fair in May. It's my first book by this author, and I'm enjoying it. It takes place in remote Alaska, mostly during winter, and I'm glad I'm reading it in the heat of summer.

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Annie Deighnaugh

I have to say, though I've been a reader all my life, my life has always been too busy to enjoy what people refer to as "summer reading". This is the first year that I've actually had time to try it...to spend a lazy summer afternoon in the cool shade with a cool drink and enjoy a good book. I really, really like it!

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Rusty

Allisande, I've read a number of Kristin Hannah's books, she is among my favorite authors. I, too, enjoyed 'The Great Alone'. Two other books of hers that stand out in my mind are "True Colors" and "The Nightingale".

I just checked my library's online card catalog for "The Crate", they don't have it. It sounds like one I'd like to read. Guess I'll have to ask them about interlibrary loan.

Rusty

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salonva

Socks-- yes I do have moderate dry eye and I am "older" actually 65.......there is some validity to what you say, and I do prefer to read on my kindle paperwhite so the lighting is always good. Lately it's not my eyes, it's my brain. I have a lot going on and while I used to find reading a great-relaxing- free- and enriching escape, somehow the past few weeks I am fighting it. I know I will find something and get right back into it because I love reading so much.

I think we all at times have these spells and I am in it right now. Haven't had one of these in a long time.


Just thought I would be pertinent and mention another one of Kristin Hannah's which was very interesting (but I did not love) The Winter Garden.

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Annie Deighnaugh

I just finished My Ex Life. Eh. I'd give it 2-3 stars only...I'll let you know what the rest of the book group thinks.

Up next The Crate: A Story of War, a Murder, and Justice...a nonfiction story about holocaust survivors who find a crate full of bones. Local library is having a discussion with the author and I'm looking forward to it.

(Note to all participants, if you can bold the book titles, it helps others who scroll through the thread looking for references to books. Thanks!)

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Rusty

Thank you for the suggestion about bolding the book titles, Annie. I've noticed others do that, but I hadn't thought about why. So I went back and 'fixed' mine. I was surprised they let me edit the posts after all this time. I will try to remember to use the bold for book titles in the future. It does help!

Rusty

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Annie Deighnaugh

I realized I usually have this thread going in Home Dec Convos, and instead accidentally put it here. So I'll keep them both going this month...hhireno kindly started the one over there.

I just finished The Crate by Levison and thought it was a 4 star with enough interest for a book club.

Up next The Lilac Girls.

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grapefruit1_ar

I just finished Beneath a Scarlet Sky ( excellent) and have started The Feather Theif.

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Rusty

Annie, I wish someone would keep a thread like this going here. Someone started an online book club on the Good Reads website for KT and other forum members, but it didn't last very long, just a few months. I think a more 'unstructured' thread, like this, seems to work better. I know I find it interesting, and it seems others do, too. Thank you for starting it.

Rusty

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juneroses Z9a Cntrl Fl

Annie Deighnaugh, thanks for mentioning the Home Dec Conv forum. I found some threads of interest to me there that I hadn't seen here. - June

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salonva

Good news- I think I am reading again. For a book club, the next one is The Plot Against America by Philip Roth. So far, so good. It's a really interesting book- takes place in Newark NJ sort of autobiographical but with fiction. It's the area that DH's family lived in so there's that of recognizing names and eras.

The fiction part is really cool. It takes place at the end of FDR's 2nd term, and the twist is that Lindbergh is drafted to run against FDR and wins. I am still at the beginning, but this has already happened and it's just fascinating at least to me.

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Bookwoman

salonva, I loved that book. A sort of companion to it is Sinclair Lewis' It Can't Happen Here, a cautionary tale for our times, even though written in the 1930s.

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Annie Deighnaugh

Rusty: I wish someone would keep a thread like this going here...

Great! Feel free to start one up every month.

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ci_lantro

Finished The Tattooist of Auschwitz and about halfway thru The Life of Pi.

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chisue

DH recommends How Not To Die Alone, a debut novel by Richard Roper. I'll pick that up after I finish Kate Atkinson's Big Sky. He's starting S. J. Rozan's newest, Paper Son. (We love Rozan's Lydia Chin/Bill Smith novels.)

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Rusty

Finished "Bouquet" by Shirl Henke. Pretty light reading, also pretty good. Takes place in CA vineyards. Started on "We Must Be Brave" by Frances Liardet. I'm only about 50 or so pages in, can't tell much about it yet. Seems borderline boring, but I'll read more before I give it up. It opens in England in 1940, a WWII novel. Usually I find novels about that era very interesting, so hopefully this one will get better a little farther in.

From Annie's post above: "Rusty: I wish someone would keep a thread like this going here...

Great! Feel free to start one up every month."

I suppose I could. Not sure how dependable I'll be, but I'm willing to take a shot at it. At least until someone else can take it over. If someone else wants to do this, PLEASE do it!

Rusty

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Annie Deighnaugh

That'd be great Rusty.

As a suggestion for everyone, it's helpful when you finish a book to let us know what you thought ... how many stars on a 1-5 scale. That way we'll know whether to add it to our own list or not. It's also helpful if you think it would be good for a book group or not.

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ci_lantro

Great idea, Annie.


Recent reads:

The Art of Racing in the Rain--4 stars

Tattooist of Auschwitz--3.5 stars

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stacey_mb

I LOVED The Art of Racing in the Rain. I had to compose myself after finishing the book, then immediately handed it over to DH who also liked it.

I raced through the last book that I read because I enjoyed it so much, in fact, I got goosebumps after reading the last few sentences. It's a portrait of the author's Tutsi mother in Rwanda at the time of the genocide by the Hutus. It's a difficult subject to cover in a book, but the author fortunately gives an idea of the events without making it graphic and difficult to read. The book, translated from French, is The Barefoot Woman and the author is Scholastique Mukasonga. Beautifully written, 5 stars. I have put the writer's other two books on hold at the library. Her first novel, Our Lady of the Nile, won the 2014 French Voices Award and was shortlisted for the 2016 International Dublin Literary Award. In 2017, her memoir Cockroaches was a finalist for the LA Times Christopher Isherwood Prize for Autobiographical Prose.

After I finished the book, I began to read a volume of short pieces assembled by a long-time radio host (now deceased) that were contributed by listeners here in Canada. The topics covered many subjects, such as being away from home during Christmas, the occasions we said "oops," fountain pens, etc. These relatively secure and peaceful images are such a dramatic contrast to Mukasonga's sad tale.

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Janie

I just finished Before We Were Yours and I give it 4 stars. Not the last star only because in the beginning, I felt it was a little slow and I was a bit disappointed but then it picked up for me and I ended up loving it. Its a novel based on a true story of black market adoption, corruption, murder, blackmail and abuse.

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raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio

I've been working my way through the Outlander series. Boy, what a mix of classic romance, bodice ripper, Perils of Pauline, and historical fiction!

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bpath reads banned books too

Fluff: another Jennifer Scott “Madame Chic” guide to living á la française. I really enjoy them because they are so simple, sweet, doable, and about France. One day I will live chic-ly.

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PKponder TX Z7B

My most recent reading:

I went on a Gillian Flynn binge reading Gone Girl, Sharp Objects, The Grownup, and Dark Places. I really enjoyed all of them and would rate them with 5 stars.


I am currently reading Little Heaven by Nick Cutter, rather gory thriller but I can't put it down. Maybe 4 stars.

Last week I read The Silent Wife by A.S.A. Harrison. I liked it a lot and give it 5 stars.


I very recently read The Great Alone, it was fabulous!

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Uptown Gal

Just reread "To Kill A Mockingbird" (re-read it every 4-5 years), and have

started, "Trevor Noah...Born a Crime".

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bob_cville

I've just finished re-reading Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage the true story of Ernest Shackleton's intended Antarctic trip where his group was going to sail to Antarctica, travel by dog sled across the entire continent, and sail away from the other side. However his ship got trapped in the ice before he ever reached land, and was carried along in the slowly moving pack for months, before being crushed by the ice. He and his men then lived on an ice floe for about another year, until the ice broke up enough that they could take their small wooden life boats and sail to some remote, uncharted island.

Reading page after page of frostbite, and snow and ice and wind and the privations they faced made coping with the heat and humidity of Virginia a little easier.

I've since started reading "Bear Town" which is fiction about a small remote northern town that is crazed and driven by ice hockey. So far it has been slow going but it has one of the same benefits and the Shackleton book. Ice. Lots of ice.

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stacey_mb

Bob, I LOVE Endurance (edited to add text after mistakenly posting before it was complete). I listened to it twice as an audiobook and found it simply amazing what he and his men went through.

Right now, I'm reading Catherine the Great : Portrait of a Woman by Robert K. Massie. She was an amazing person and the book is wonderful. My sister just finished Shoes for Anthony by Emma Kennedy which takes place in Wales during WW II. She really enjoyed it, so I will read it next.

I started to read another of Mukasonga's books that I mentioned in my previous post. It was way too dark and I don't think I will finish it.

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nopartyghost

Infrequent participant here. I stopped in to find ideas for a next book to read & found two that look interesting Red Daughter & Barefoot Woman. Thought I should contribute. Resistance Women by Jennifer Chiaverini. The main character, Mildred, was a real person & much of it was her life in Germany during the rise of the Nazis. Some chilling parallels to today. I rate it 4 stars.

guilty pleasure is Daniel Silva's Gabriel Allon series. Just finished his latest The New Girl. It did not follow his usual formula, but does make heavy use of current events. Always enjoy his books.

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watchmelol

I am reading the Stillhouse Lake series by Rachel Caine.

It's about a woman who unbeknownst to her was married to a serial killer. In the books she is fighting for her and her children's lives and reputations. She is being stalked and doxed by both online and real life people who refuse to believe she wasn't an accessory to her husbands crimes.

I am also reading Endurance......Years Gone By by Lori Oleson.

It's a collection of stories of great horses and riders from the 70's, 80's and 90's in the sport of endurance riding in the US. The early day although certainly not the earliest. But definitely a window of time when the sport grew tremendously. My instructor and her two most successful horses are prominent in the book. No surprise to me since I have yet to pick up anything on endurance without her name in there somewhere. One of our school horses is a cousin to one of those exceptional animals.

PS I also loved The Art of Racing in the Rain.








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bob_cville

> Bob, I LOVE Endurance (edited to add text after mistakenly
posting before it was complete). I listened to it twice as an
audiobook and found it simply amazing what he and his men went through.

I agree. If it were a work of fiction I'd find it entirely too far-fetched to be believable, but given that it is a factual account supported by photographic evidence it is indeed amazing. I recently saw a PBS show where someone was trying to duplicate the second-last part of the journey where Shackleton and 5 others sailed from Elephant Island to South Georgia Island, 800 miles away, in a 22 foot boat, across what are widely considered to be the roughest seas anywhere in the world. The modern adventurer, IIRC, had to call his support ship because he was in danger of sinking.

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liz

I'm reading the Hannah Swensen series by Joanne Fluke...talk about recipes...OMGOSH...I wanna bake something! really good reads and some of her books have been made into movies for the Hallmark Channel!

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ci_lantro

Finished The Life of Pi. I'm giving it 2 stars. And have started The Lost World (Conan Doyle). Not getting much reading done because of yard cleanup after a bad storm on Saturday. Exhausted & manage to only read a page or two before dropping off. Then, the next night, I have to re-read those couple of pages to remember where I'm at! Only me to do the clean-up because DH is recouping from surgery.

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sweet_betsy No AL Z7

Being a Michael Connelly and Jeffery Deaver fan, I have had to branch out since I have read most of their books. I found A Death to Record by Rebecca Tope a British author writing about a murder on a dairy farm in the Cotswolds that kept me guessing until the end.

Also, enjoyed The House on Oyster Creek by Heidi Jon Schmidt which was set on Cape Cod. It turned out to be a love story with a different ending. Beautiful prose.

I will try to find other works by these two at my library.

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liira55

Butter Down the Well by Robert Collins. It's about his life as a young boy in 1930's in Saskatchewan.

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chisue

Finished Paper Son and can't recommend it. Way too much backstory about Chinese in The South. Rozan always has 'a cause', which I enjoy, but I doubt this will be a best seller in Mississippi, where the story takes place. (Meth labs, Good Ole Boy cops, 'politics'.)

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nicole___

I like "light" reading. "A Street Cat Named Bob", was 5 stars.

I'm starting "Alita"....before I see the movie.

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Rusty

I ended up ditching "We Must be Brave" a little over half way through, had a few fairly good chapters, but mostly way too boring for my taste. So no stars.

Next read "Sacred Ground" by Barbara Wood. Very good, 5 stars.

Currently almost halfway into "The Summer Guests" by Mary Alice Monroe. Enjoying it very much so far.

I've never belonged to a book club, so have no way to form an opinion of whether a book would be good for a group discussion or not.

Rusty

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happy2b…gw

I just completed Under the Scarlet Sky and also enjoyed it very much. The author vividly narrates the exploits of a young Italian man in occupied northern Italy during WWII. It is a tragic and inspiring story. Not only is it about war but also a coming of age story.

I was not impressed with Ida and Martha. I picked it up because the two main characters were in their early 70's, unusual for most books. I was looking for something of senior friendships. The author touched on every current societal issues, then added a predictable ending. I am starting Last Boat Out of Shanghai, the story of the Chinese who fled Mao's revolution.

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chisue

I'm into Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb. I highly recommend this. Gottlieb is a therapist -- following a career in print and TV writing -- even some years of med school at thirty-plus. It's part commentary on her work with patients and part diary, detailing her own therapy following a romantic breakup she experiences in her forties.

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Annie Deighnaugh

I just finished The Secret History. I'll give it 4 stars, not for book group. For about the first 100 pages, I was, why am I reading this? But then it got good and interesting and compelling...psychological thriller. So many scenes I could picture just how Alfred Hitchcock would've done it if he were around.

Up next, another from the Great American Read: Anne of Green Gables.

I'm looking forward to the next book group book...Killers of the Flower Moon nonfiction about the creation of the FBI.

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nickel_kg

I finished the two "Secret Diary of Hendrick Groen" novels mentioned above. Amusing, a bit thought provoking, I wonder if we will get another in a few years. I recently finished Suzy Becker's "I Had Brain Surgery, What's Your Excuse" -- her account of discovering she had a brain tumor, the early days after the operation, and what stretched into months of recovery. Filling in the gaps this month has been a cozy mystery series by Ann Ross. Her heroine, Miss Julia, is a sort of 'steel magnolia' and charmingly blind to her own foibles.

On the couch next to me is a treat with a rather impressive subtitle: "BakeWise: the Hows and Whys of Successful Baking With over 200 Magnificent Recipes". I've read bits of cookery writing by Shirley Corriher before, am hoping this book lives up to its name.

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Janie

Oh Nickel! I have read a few of the Miss Julia stories and I love them. The first was the best, imo, Miss Julia Speaks Her Mind. A friend gave me a bunch of them from a book sale and I keep them at our summer cottage and our teenage granddaughters have found them and enjoyed them too :)

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socks

Just finished Lisa See’s new book “Island of Sea Women.” 5 stars! Excellent

Starting “Shepherd’s Hut.” Survival in the Australian outback. Winton. It’s written in slangy Australian vernacular which is read easily enough but different from most current popular fiction. I like survival stories.

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stacey_mb

Socks, I also loved The Island of Sea Women. I definitely agree with 5 stars.

For interested readers - although the book is fiction, it is based on the true incredible lives of women who lived and worked in this unique society. Amazing!

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Bookwoman

I just finished Anna Seghers' The Seventh Cross, written in Germany in 1936. It takes place in a small town in Germany, after Hitler's rise to power but before the beginning of the war, and concerns prisoners who have escaped from a concentration camp. None of the prisoners are Jewish, but the foreshadowing of what is to come is remarkably prescient.

I've now started Rachel Kushner's The Mars Room, about a woman serving a life sentence in a California prison. It was a Booker Prize finalist last year. I very much enjoyed her previous novel The Flamethrowers.

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socks

Stacey—I totally agree. It also brings attention to a historical tragedy, not well known. It’s an outstanding book, unforgettable. Well researched too.

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watchmelol

Finished reading the above and now I am reading In The Middle Are the Horsemen by Tik Maynard. I can't put it down. It is the story of his experience as a working student.
The son of prominent Canadian equestrians, Maynard decided to spend the next year as a “working student.” In the horse industry, working students aspire to become professional riders or trainers, and willingly trade labor for hands–on education. Here Maynard chronicles his experiences–good and bad–and we follow along as one year becomes three, what began as a casual adventure gradually transforms, and a life's purpose comes sharply into focus.

I am about to start The Old Man by Thomas Perry.

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Janie

I just zipped through White Rose Black Forest, I couldn't put it down! https://www.eoindempseybooks.com/  It is a Nazi story based on true events. My first from author Eoin Dempsey but not my last.

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