jay6a

What native plants are you growing this year?

This is the continuation of my original thread about winter sowing a bunch, plethora, multitude of natives. Well everything didn't work out the way I had hoped they would. A lot of species never germinated for a variety of reasons that are being explored. Anyways it is what it is, and I have the plants I have. And there are still a lot of new species that I get to grow that are totally awesome, so if you are growing any natives feel free to join in!

Comments (1.1K)

  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Skip, that's a lot of common milkweeds.! Why would the Solidago seeds sprout now? Did you do a hot water treatment? Do those ferns type plants just have foliage for most of the time and then send up that flower? Maybe they would look alright in shade. Do they need a lot of moisture like ferns, because if they do, why would they be popping up in your yard? Blueberries need very acidic soil. Nice pictures everyone, thanks!


  • Skip1909
    last year
    last modified: last year

    One source I saw said a lot of Solidago species don't need any cold pretreatment or any other special treatment to germinate. From https://tomclothier.hort.net/page04.html

    "Solidago altissima, caesia, canadensis, cutleri, gigantea, glomerata, graminifolia, juncea, missouriensis, multiradiata, nemoralis, pinetorum, puberula, remota, riddellii, rigida, roanesis, sempervirens, speciosa, sphacelata, uliginosa, and virgaurea, Sow at 20ºC (68ºF), germinates in less than two wks"

    Others say they need cold moist treatment, so I'm wondering what will happen.

    That fern is tiny, the stalk came up this week. I guess it doesn't need a lot of moisture because the soil is just average there.

    As far as I know the underlying soil in my area is a very acidic. I haven't tested it personally but thats what the USDA says. You can do a search with your town or a nearby town and "Official Soil Series Descriptions" to find out about your soil.

    ETA: Symphyotrichum laeve doesnt need any pretreatment either, going to direct sow my remaining seeds later.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Skip1909
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  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I'll sow some of my caesia, odorata and flexicaulis seeds and see if I can get a headstart then. I was looking at the goldenrods that Prairie Moon carries. There are a couple xeric species that I want to grow, in spots where I don't want to water. I might be growing 5 or 6 Solidago species if all the seeds germinate. Right now I want the flexicaulis more than the rest. I spent all day yesterday watering and then it rained all night. I was fertilizing too. The Laportea canadensis is flowering. They look unusual. The female flowers are lower on the plant and the male flowers are higher. At least that species is beginning to colonize. The park is full of snow berries, Symphoricapos, but I have yet to see one with flowers or seeds. They sucker the, which is good. Going to collect more Staphylea and Ptelea seeds. All of the Bidens species are annuals. It's amazing how fast they get so big. I like the B. cernua because it has connate, sessile leaves with red veins and then the awesome lemon yellow flowers. The other 2 species to collect seeds for are B. polylepis, and B. aristosa. They call one of them swamp beggersticks, but I see them in normal mesic soil all the time. I thought this white flowered plant in the front yard was the foot tall upland white goldenrod, Solidago ptarmicoides, but the flower buds aren't round like the internet pictures, they look more like wild lettuce flower buds. Skip, did you ever find out what was eating your pipelines a while back? Damn autocorrect! lol

  • Skip1909
    last year
    last modified: last year

    The place I bought the flexicaulis seeds said cold stratify 8 weeks. I think I have a bidens growing under that Norway spruce but it didnt show up until recently and with all the shade didnt grow much or flower either. Still dont know what ate the pipevine. Yesterday I finally put in bamboo stakes next to them for them to climb, and I still have to plant the rest of them. A couple places, toadshade and wild ridge, carry a cool one local to the east coast, Solidago puberula, one for thin infertile soil.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Skip1909
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year

    I didn't think to include any cabbage family Brassica plants anywhere. I had a native one, winter sown that didn't germinate. It was supposed to be a great host plant. There are some truly rare white butterflies native here, that feed on those plants too. I've had a couple tomato plants in pots, but they haven't produced any tomatoes yet. I'll never try them in pots again. Skip, how are those veggies you planted doing? I thought you got them in kind of late. I remember once on the victory garden, Roger, the organic guy said he mulched his blueberries with sawdust, because it would be acidic when it broke down. My swamp milkweeds are in really bad shape and there were some Monarch cats on them about to run out of food, so I put them all on other lush milkweeds. There's still plenty of milkweed to go around. There's something about swamp milkweeds. The yellow aphids attack them all way more than the others. I freaked when I looked at the 2 little swamp seedlings that were eaten down to sticks and aphids were lined up and down their stems. On the old victory garden, Roger had the coolest compost system. It was like an enclosure the size of a stagecoach. At the bottom were screens. The thing could could handle having dead plants added to it for years, or forever maybe. And over time as it broke down the fine material, ready to use, would fall thru the screen and accumulate. Awesome! Think of alllll the work that saves, and time.

  • Skip1909
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I dont know if the corn, beans and squash are going to finish in time. The tomatos are growing gangbusters, theyre kind of a pain because they need more supports. One corn stalk is tassling, the squash is flowering too. No flowers on the beans yet but I added stakes on friday and theyre climbing them fast. Not the most recent pictures, mind you, they've grown even more

    oh man, please ignore all the weeds. Cant bring myself to spend a bunch of money on grass seed.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Skip1909
  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    It’s looking good! Hope you will get to harvest some. Jay are you sure you have enough milkweed? I have eggs and caterpillars on every one. Still egg laying going on. With 2 month to go, I am kind of worried. If more Tussock moth caterpillars show up, I am doomed. Speaking of cabbage, there isn’t a single Cabbage White to be seen. Really odd.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
  • dandy_line (Z3b N Cent Mn)
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Skip-my Button Bush is right in the middle of the well watered garden area. I'm thinking of digging it out and putting it somewhere else out of the way as it is not that showy, and taking up space for what is.

    Jay-thanks for the id on the Panicum, but I'm pretty sure it is not a cultivar, just looks like one. I grabbed some seeds, but It's maybe too early yet. I did find some larger clumps of Panicum too but they are not reddish color. Milkweed seed not viable yet either. Going to get another 1 1/2 inches of rain today. I'm seeing Monarchs but never saw a cat this year at all. Up here, this far north, we must have a thousand Milkweed plants for every Monarch that comes by. They can pick and choose at will.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked dandy_line (Z3b N Cent Mn)
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year

    Basically, I read the stories behind most of these grass cultivars, and they usually always come from a wild colony someone chanced in the wild, so in essence it's something genetic that can turn up under the right conditions in a species like Panicum virgatum. Some guy from Maine had a Eurybia divaricata that had a lot of reddish coloring in the stems and leaves. I thought he had a rare mutation until I watched a Monty Don video and saw him planting some that had the same reddish color. Man, it's still raining. Maybe I got rid of my button bush because it wasn't looking nice when it wasn't in bloom either lol. Now I want it bad! There's been a lot of cabbage whites. There was a little clone volunteer. They lay eggs on those too. I think the horseradish is finally eradicated. Pretty sure I have more than enough milkweeds. It's only in the past couple years that I've noticed a lot of Monarch cats. Maybe you'll start getting more up there Dandy. It's looking like there are a lot of Monarchs around, even all the milkweeds at the park are eaten down to sticks. Skip, that looks like poison ivy by your corn. It's all over my yard. I just leave it, but I won't let it grow up trees. I think it's hilarious how some people feel about it. There's a lot of it by the shed that I need to clear. I'll be wearing gloves for sure then. Squash blossoms are edible. You can stir fry them or batter them and fry them or make tempura.

  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    Well, I am really not sure there will be enough. Between some of them looking bad with rust and the Monarchs showing up a month early and adding another generation, no sprig is left untouched.

    Since you all have been looking at goldenrods. Any idea about this one, or do I need to wait for it to really bloom? They are about 2.5 to 3 feet.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Wow Iris, I wish I could send you some milkweeds. You must really be swamped. Your goldenrod has smooth leaves. That might make it easier to ID. I just saw some zig zag goldenrod at the park. It had to be, because the stems were zig zag. There was another nice looking new one there too. One of my Agrimony plants and all my Elephantopus are getting flower buds. I was not expecting them to bloom the 1st year from seed. All the very late blooming things are starting to flower now. All year I've been wondering what goes along with that foliage.

    Skip, that plant by the corn might be a Rubus too?

    Cirsium discolor. Where are all the black swallowtails?

    Thalictrum, I think it's dasycarpum, but not 100%.
    I need to look this up again. Used to know the name. The flowers are tiny. I wonder if it's a host plant?

    I didn't have my phone, but the Asclepias latifolia's leaves are getting wider. They are so cool looking.

  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    I am still a bit disappointed in my latifolia. 3rd year and not a single flower bud in sight. Of course now they are being eaten, too. I just thought earlier that our subdivision of fifty houses has at last 300 acres. There are just 4 houses I have seen milkweed. This includes the small patch of butterfly weed my next door neighbor has. So where would they go if not my yard?

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    If there are still a lot of eggs and babies they might finish off all mine. There hasn't been many cats at the other place, but a couple of my variegata seedlings were eaten pretty good. I went to look at the milkweeds at the park down the street, and more of them are eaten this year. They mowed a lot more of the wildflowers and milkweeds, so asked a worker there why that was, and he said that land is owned by a farmer who leases it to the city, and he wants hay now. That is so ridiculous! That's my town for you. So I guess I need to find out who this farmer is and try to reach him. Why would you feed cows a bunch of milkweeds? I do really want to talk to who'd in charge there. They should start selling milkweeds in the produce section.


  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    Well, I was whining to Javi earlier. The owner of the empty lot behind me cut everything down yesterday. In two weeks it would have been so beautiful with all the goldenrods. He used the “big guns”, so all the little trees coming up are history, too. Man, I wish I could get my hands on these 13 acres. He has a huge house across the street from it on a hill, so he keeps it for his view I suppose.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    That bugs me when they are just empty lots. Why don't they stop mowing and cutting and help the environment instead? And a lot of people think goldenrods cause hay fever.

  • Skip1909
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Everybody has a big lawn, its going to be the bain of us. They keep clear cutting woodlands to build adult active communities and mixed condo/retail developements. Theres going to be no permeable ground left. Now, where do I sign up to get my environmental protection conspiracy bucks?

    Jay the 3-leaved plant by the corn is the Purple Kingsessing Bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, native to mesoamerica. Its a dry bean. It needs 70-90 days, I estimate about 45 days left until frost.

    There is some disease or nutrient dificiency afflicting it, but its still growing fast.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Skip1909
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year

    Iris, I looked at every Solidago species, and I narrowed it down to 5 species that might be yours. S. nemoralis, sphacelata, roanensis, petiolaris, and pulchra. There are so many species it's hard to tell them apart. There is also one species with white petals called S. bicolor that looks similar to yours. That's a nice species. I guess for genera like this, with a lot of species, a couple people over at name that plant, (Carol and jekeesl) might be better help than me. I'm still looking at the cudweeds.

  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    Thanks, Jay! I will look them up! I like that it is not so tall. Seems to reseed a lot. There were 2 plants in that area last year, now there are about 15. But they come out easily. None of the 3 feet root business. It’s raining!

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year

    Great! Hope you get a good soak. The sun's out here. I have now my lawn. There are a lot of species growing in it now. I grew a fern leaved Corydalis in the front years ago and they fizzled out, and now, years later, some seedlings are coming up in the front lawn. Everything will look nice after the rain.

  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year

    Iris, did you ever see any bugs on your Apios flowers? Every time I looked, there were no bugs. I really want seeds and I don't know if they are being pollinated. I just think it's strange because bees are usually all over bean flowers, and these are native, so they should be even more attractive to the bees. Bees usually love all legume flowers.

  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    I have seen a few tiny bees and flies around it. Not that many though.

  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Iris, do you have any bean pods on your Apios vines?

    Cat on a rare milkweed.Hiding under the leaf.
    Color, texture, I love those Gomphrena fireworks!

    Elephantopus preparing to flower. It makes me happy knowing they have buds!
    The Cynanchum laeve, honeyvine is settling in well. After doing more than what is humanly possible to keep all my milkweed seedlings alive(lol javi) it's a nice thought to have an extremely aggressive milkweed to do battle with; and no matter who wins, it's still a win/win for the Monarchs.
    The Tithonias are beautiful and growing higher and higher. The Monarchs and bumblebees love them.
    Nabalus album with crispate blossom.
    Anyone want Jack in the pulpit seeds?
    I know this is native and it has wispy flowers if you look close. It looks to me like purple love grass, but I thought it was supposed to be red top.
    Side oats gamma.
    Lobelia siphilitica, and disobedient plant. These were all that survived. I need to start multiplying them.


  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year


    Agrimony with buds
    Asclepias latifolia.
    New stalks of common milkweeds.
    Laportea canadensis, wood nettle, blooming with male and female flowers.
    The deer ate half of my brown eyed Susan. I don't know what that's supposed to mean.
    Collinsonia canadensis.
    This is the only chrysalis that I found. They are good at hiding them.

  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    Jay, love how colorful it is! Your Zinnias and Mexican sunflowers are looking so good! Didn’t really check the Apios for seedpots. That’s your Amorpha Fruticosa with the chrysalis, right? I planted mine literally in the middle of nowhere since I have read they are suckering a lot. Did I get this wrong?

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year

    I read that they can spread to form colonies, but I've never heard anyone complain about them being hard to control. I'm not worried about them spreading.

  • Skip1909
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Looks good Jay. Did you grow any Panicum oligosanthes? My Tridens flavus is flowering and its much larger with wider leaves than the one in your picture, so maybe that is purple love grass. You got some new stuff from the wintersowing extravaganza. What happened with all the empty bins, are they sitting with seeds and soil somewhere or did you dump them?

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Skip1909
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    No panicum germinated. I had purple love grass just a couple years ago, so it looks familiar. The bins are made out of biodegradable plastic I think. I emptied them, and threw them all away. I'm doing the winter sowing in more durable nursery pots. There are two bins with soil left. They have the ginseng and A. serpentaria seeds and need double dormancy. I messed up and accidentally dumped the bin with the lilium michiganense seeds. There are 8 bigger clearer bins that I can still use too, and I have several 4" pots. I moved the caterpillar off the seedling and onto a syriaca. I moved my last surviving ovalifolia into more sun. The other one got eaten a couple days ago. Did some weeding, mostly morning glories. Planted an Amsonia hubrichtii plant. It's only native to Arkansas and Oklahoma, it's not native for me or in Minnesota. I had to go look at something that wasn't mowed and saw the most beautiful goldenrod. I'm pretty sure it was S. gigantea.
    This plant was over 6' tall.

    Solidago gigantea.
    closer
    in my face
    These are more unknown goldenrods.
    Another unknown.
    Rattlesnake master. Eryngium yuccifolium.
    A Eupatorium, boneset species, either the late or the tall boneset. This plant was huge, 5'+ The New Jersey Tea bush bloomed a long time ago. I just collected seeds from it yesterday.
    Verbesina alternifolia, wingstem. 8'+
    This cat was fuzzy, but it's not showing.
    The Dupage river and Verbesina alternifolia looking different growing in the shade.

  • dandy_line (Z3b N Cent Mn)
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Iris, It looks real close to the S. nemoralis that grows up here, but in dry soil, and doesn't want to rule the world like the others.

    I don't have any Cats bu t the neighbor lady two lots down has many , but I think she was just showing off to me. My Liatris ligulistylis is blooming, getting ready for the big migration. This has to be the MUST HAVE plant for Monarch lovers, at least here in the central flyway. The Milkweed fanatics miss the point because milkweed is not in bloom during fall migration. I can't got to Mexico without eating.

    Today I picked seeds off the Penstemon grandiflora that was growing in a ditch this summer. And there's some really nice Butterfly Weed growing by the railroad track that is ready to pop. I also found a nice grove of Mianthemum stellata with beautiful berries that will be ready to pick in a week or two. I'm making a real concerted effort this year to collect a lot more wild species, maybe I can sell them over winter as a hobby

    Jay-is that white plant New Jersey Tea? I have already begun cold striating the Lillium michiganense, so hopefully they can germinate over this coming winter..

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked dandy_line (Z3b N Cent Mn)
  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    Dandy, you are so right about providing the nectar. The Frostweeds are taking over my world, but they are so busy in late Fall, I didn’t have the heart to thin them out now. I was also wondering about the white plant. Just waiting for Jay to apply some labels.

    Speaking of Monarch cats, there are more than a dozen on my fasicularis. With leaves this small, this is not going to work. Back to moving them around.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
  • Skip1909
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Those pictures are awesome Jay. The first plant is goldenrod? I just refilled an empty tray with bagged soil and sowed 15 cells purple love grass, 8 slender wood oats, 7 blue stem goldenrod, and 8 smooth blue aster. Stuck it outside in the cold frame. They dont need any stratification so lets hope they germinate and I get around 45 days of growth before I HAVE to plant them. Kind of bummed I see my only remaining Anaphalis seedling is all shriveled up. No explanation, the soil doesnt feel too wet or too dry.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Skip1909
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Sorry I messed up the picture order earlier and didn't label. I went back and fixed it. I've edited and messed up 20 times now so that's all. lol

    I don't know what species this is. It looks like a Helianthus.
    I thought maybe swamp sunflower, but the flowers don't look right.
    More wispy Solidagos. I'm going to collect seeds for the gigantea. I need juncea seeds.

    The weedy Canada goldenrod. Solidago canadensis.
    Alnus incana, speckled alder.

    A large water bird.
    I don't know what this is, but the buds look like sunflower family Asteraceae.

    The new home for the cat that was eating the seedling. Nice fresh leaves.


  • javiwa
    last year

    I know I should post to Name that Plant (or whatever that forum's called), but you guys are usually good at this....my stuff is never very exotic or rare. Here's that same plant I posted last week about the cotyledon:



    Are we still thinking morning glory? Thanks!

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked javiwa
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    This could happen if you don't deadhead your morning glories, and deadheading morning glories is a royal PITA! But so is pulling quadrillions of them! lol


    Yes, that's what they look like. I think I've pulled thousands of them this year. The cypress vines have been bad lately. How are your milkweeds? Is the onotheroides getting big. I will have seeds for the pink Tweedia if you want some. The Monarch cats will eat that one. Do you deadhead your Tithonias and Zinnias?


  • Skip1909
    last year

    Generally yes, morning glory. Which species? Dont know

    I went back to check the goldenrod for seed again. I think now it could be Solidago odora based on the anise smell in the air, although I couldn't detect the smell on the leaf itself.

    Whatcha think?

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Skip1909
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    It looks nice. I'll look closer at it later. I still have odora seeds and was planning on round 2. Yep, I want that anise smell. A lot of these species are native over a wide area, so if they are native to Illinois, they will usually have something on Illinois wildflowers about it. In their articles at the bottom in the comments, they usually give ways to identy the species and how to distinguish it from similar species. It's helpful with getting ID's. I use them for name that plant. There are so many goldenrods and they still all look pretty much the same to me. I want to get better at IDing them. What's the white flower by the path? Are those rhodis? Sometimes the middles of big rhodies get hollowed out and then people can use them like for secret rooms. A bunch of us were partying inside a big rhodie at the Kentucky derby. lol

  • Skip1909
    last year

    Those are young hickory trees Carya tomentosa and another species, pignut I think, there are a lot of them there. I put the white flowers on NTP, Eupatorium altissimum. Theres also Eupatorium hyssopifolium in there.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Skip1909
  • javiwa
    last year

    Thanks for confirming, guys! I'm gonna yank!


    Jay: MW is doing fine -- has flowered and growth has slowed. Would like it to get pollinated, so I stuck it next to one of the high-traffic HBs (though, cannot remember if this is the type of MW that needs another of the same type of MW in the vicinity to be pollinated). I did deadhead my tithonia this year, but I'm not sure if that was a good idea. I noticed that as I deadheaded just the blossom (and not all the way down to the main stem, the remaining leaves turned ugly brown very quickly. I deadheaded the zinnia once; but frankly it's doing so well, I really don't know if my intervention had any affect. "They" say it's a good idea to deadhead -- maybe that's for those who need/love neat and tidy. Sometimes, it's just too hot for neat and tidy...more like water-and-get-back-inside!

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked javiwa
  • javiwa
    last year

    PS Does your pink tweedia attracts flutters and hummers? There are so many wonderful plants out there, I need to control myself!

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked javiwa
  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year
    last modified: last year

    So Javi, did you yank? I have spend two hours today on morning glory and cypress vine. Dead heading sounds good in theory. If someone can give me a lift up there?

    I never knew there are so many different goldenrods and bonesets. Should look further into this. I really like boneset. I planted the common one, and Eupatorium linearifolium showed up last year (identified in Name that Plant). Had some really cute company today. Guess he likes sweaty hands :)

    Edited because my pictures were not showing for me, so I tried again. Should probably check the news today, my local weather guy already updated his cover on Facebook to “ tracking Dorian”


    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
  • javiwa
    last year

    Oh, I yanked, Iris! You guys will be jealous, but it took me all of 10 seconds. :)


    Jay 6a Chicago thanked javiwa
  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    Seems to me my pictures didn’t post. Or don’t show for me. The one with cypress vine was one with it tangled at the top of the palm. This palm is as high as the roof, so yeah. Not going to dead head up there. Ten seconds, eh? Yep. I am jealous.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
  • javiwa
    last year

    Hmm, your pictures showed up for me, Iris. Yikes, I see the little red blooms all the way up there. If you just nip it at ground level, won't everything going upward die naturally?

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked javiwa
  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    That’s what I am doing for the most part. I do like to have one or two growing up there. The hummingbirds and sulphurs really love them. But with no way to dead head, there will be hundreds more. Here is what my previous post looks like for me. Except I probably won’t know if I posted the picture. Jeez. I thought things are fixed. You must be a VIP to see them.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
  • javiwa
    last year

    Your post appears fine to me:



    Jay 6a Chicago thanked javiwa
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year

    Iris, can you see these pictures?

    Panicum or Dichanthelium.
    a very large Liatris
    4 more amazing places close by to see. I came out here looking for sassafras seeds but there wasn't any seeds on any of them.
    I saw more viceroys and sulphurs out here.
    Looks just like round headed bush clover, Lespedeza capitata.
    Euphorbia corrolata
    Bidens aristosa I think.
    obedient plant
    Vernonia
    A Liatris. Is it aspera?

  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    No pictures. Let’s see if Dandy sees them. Since it seems we are the outcasts.

    Jay 6a Chicago thanked Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year

    Well, this thread lasted a lot longer anyways.

  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I STARTED A NEW THREAD. PLEASE GO OVER THERE, thanks.

  • Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)
    last year

    Wait, but I see a picture of grass now! Maybe it was one of the lastest hiccups. Like pictures shrinking.

  • Jay 6a Chicago
    Original Author
    last year

    I'll try to only post my own pics from now on. Sorry!

    Cirsium discolor