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Ann

One more link on the topic. This is very interesting news.

"Looking at the medium to longer run, the only way the individual market will really grow is if there is migration from group. So in that sense, this is potentially a big deal. But even under the best-case scenario, it will be a multi-year process. The timeline to 2020 is extremely tight, and implementation will be very challenging in the short run. Employers are cautious with benefits, so I wouldn’t expect a huge acceleration of this right out of the gate. But the longer-term implications could be significant, because many people like the idea of a direct-to-consumer market for health insurance, and directionally, this is the kind of thing that needs to happen to bring that to scale."



https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/6/17/18682453/trump-new-health-care-plan-health-reimbursement-arrangements

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F.M.

That forbes article is an opinion piece from a guy who's invested in companies selling ... HRAs

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Ann

F.M., you can SOB that particular link, the thread in general, or find a third source more to you liking if the topic interests you. But, to me, this is significant news.

"Beginning next January, employers will be able to use HRAs to help employees obtain their own coverage with the administration’s blessing."

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Ann

Despite how hard the media is trying to paint a bleak picture of some of Trump's healthcare initiatives to provide choice, they are good for consumers willing to do their homework. This new change would be good for both employers and employees.

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F.M.

Medicare for all is the right answer, Not handouts to the insurance companies.

This means people are going to have less insurance, and less money to buy insurance.


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F.M.

Ann

F.M., you can SOB that particular link, the thread in general, or find a third source more to you liking if the topic interests you. But, to me, this is significant news.

It's your post; you might want to stop cheering leading for the insurance companies and think about people who work for a living who will lose their insurance.

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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

"...they are good for consumers willing to do their homework."

And for those who aren't able to do their homework?

Like anyone with three jobs, or a couple of kids, or a mental illness, or decreased cognitive function, or a debilitating physical disability or disease?

What about a child with deadbeat parents or a ward of the state, are they going to be doing a whole lot of homework on this?

What about when the insurance providers deliberately make the information ambiguous, confusing, or "tricky"? How much good will all the homework in the world do?

It doesn't have to be this complicated...

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tony jelly

Universal health care is what is needed not more market-driven pretense.

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Ann

When I say good for those willing to do their homework, I'll give an example. We're currently covered by a short term plan that is working perfectly for us, and saving us $1000 per month. I've had the occasion to use it twice and the coverage was excellent. Most recently, I had my annual physical. I knew I would have a $50 copay as I had selected a plan (among many choices) that allowed an annual physical for the $50 copay. But, I also knew the cost of the blood work was on me. Discussing this with my doc's front desk when I called to make the appt., they suggested I consider doing my blood work at a big health fair my city has each spring. So, I did at a cost of $60. I had also called the lab where it was done previously and my out of pocket cost there would have been $550. So, a little homework and it was very affordable (remember, we're saving $1000 each and every month, so this $110 was a small price to pay for my annual physical)! I shop for groceries by clicking on coupons and using stores with lower prices. I can certainly spend a few minutes doing the same kind of comparison shopping for blood work when I know I'll incur the cost.

But, if you look at the biased media trying hard to bash anything Trump, you'll see story after story of these "terrible short term junk plans". Quite the opposite is true, they work just as they say they will, and if one has made a selection with care, it can be a huge cost savings. If I have a serious heart attack tomorrow, I'm covered.

The plan I'm on wouldn't be the right one for everyone, but it was an excellent and extremely cost effective choice for my situation - and I'm a huge believer in consumer choice!

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mrskjun(9)

Estimates of 28 to 32 trillion over ten years for Medicare for all. The concept sounds wonderful, but I'm waiting for the one person who will tell us how it is paid for.

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F.M.

a 1.8 percent increase

Top-Line Findings

We estimate that total health expenditures under a Medicare for All plan that provides comprehensive coverage and long-term care benefits would be $3.89 trillion in 2019 (assuming such a plan was in place for all of the year), or a 1.8 percent increase relative to expenditures under current law. This estimate accounts for a variety of factors including increased demand for health services, changes in payment and prices, and lower administrative costs. We also include a supply constraint that results in unmet demand equal to 50 percent of the new demand. If there were no supply constraint, we estimate that total health expenditures would increase by 9.8 percent to $4.20 trillion.

While the 1.8 percent increase is a relatively small change in national spending, the federal government’s health care spending would increase substantially, rising from $1.09 trillion to $3.50 trillion, an increase of 221 percent.

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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

I am truly glad that you like your plan, Ann.

I'm concerned for the people who don't have your ability to research and make wise decisions.

For a person with a traumatic brain injury, choosing cereal for breakfast can be a debilitating task on a bad day. Combing through stacks of paperwork/pages of PDFs for a couple of hours is enough to put this person in bed for days.

How can such a person possibly do their homework and confidently choose a plan that is going to cover all or a lot of the support they need?

This is only one example of a person who could not reasonably be expected to commit to hours of research in order to find the best plan.

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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

Mrskjun there are lots of people who have outlined the funding for universal health care.

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Ann

Lindsey, you mentioned people who may not be able to do their homework or make sensible choices due to something like a mental illness. There are a heck of a lot more choices than health insurance this person might need help with.

In every society, there will always be a group of people who will need help in one form or another (welfare, decision making help, help with managing decisions related to child rearing, etc.). But, that does not mean that a country needs to put every single citizen in precisely the same bucket (and make every decision on behalf of every citizen) because some are less capable of decision making than others. You don't do away with a free market and put all personal decision making in the hands of big government for that reason. To my thinking, that's completely ludicrous.

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Ann

"It's your post; you might want to stop cheering leading for the insurance companies and think about people who work for a living who will lose their insurance."

Exactly! It does happen to be a thread I started and one you can willingly choose to skip.

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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

But a person with mental or physical disabilities needs advanced health care, and they need it immediately and on an on-going basis.

They often don't have the luxury of time, and their caregivers are increasingly stretched to the limit.

It doesn't have to be so difficult.

Edit: you don't have to do away with free market. We have our universal health care, and we have extended medical provided through our employer. Both can exist.

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Zeus

Ann - you were a federal employee? So, can you jump on FEHB when your bare minimum insurance doesn't cover what you have?

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chase_gw

I know very little about HRA's...but the little bit I do know would make me wonder if this isn't really just a way to allow employers to stop paying for healthcare insurance and instead offer HRA's to their employees ......which I suspect are much cheaper for the employers.


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Ann

No Zeus (neither of us ever a federal employee) and I don't know what FEHB is.

We can (and, in fact, will have to soon) enroll in the plan we were on previously at the first of any given month. It was a plan offered to retirees of the company my husband retired from. Our cost was $1400+ per month (so not inexpensive at all!). Alternatively, we could get on the Obamacare exchanges for a similar price. The reason we have to choose one of those two expensive options in the not too far future is because our liberal state government has passed legislation virtually doing away with short term plans in my state. State governments have that ability, or conversely, they can not only allow them but can allow them for up to three years. This is a time we sure wish we lived in one of those wonderful red states!

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sunflower_petal(5a)

I assume this means that people can put more 'tax-free' money into their HRA and then use that to pay for their premiums. Sometimes employers chip in some of their own money into the HRA (to seed it), using the money they saved from not paying as much for healthcare (because they are transferring more of the cost to the employees: 'we'll give you money to spend as you like' which always sounds nice but is really just cheaper for them).

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Joaniepoanie

Ann....you save $1,000 a month on your current plan as opposed to what? What is considered a short term plan?

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VedaBeeps SoCal 9b/10a(9b/10)

“The plan I'm on wouldn't be the right one for everyone”


That’s right, short term plans aren’t good for people with asthma, diabetes or other pre-existing conditions as they either aren’t covered or are only covered at a much higher premium, people who are planning on having a family since maternity/ delivery/ newborn care are not covered, they generally don’t cover hospitalization or only cover $5000. Most don't cover prescription drugs so they aren’t good for people who are medicated for chronic conditions.


Basically, they aren’t good for a large percentage of the population and are not a substitute for real insurance coverage. They’re intended as gap coverage and are only slightly better than having no insurance at all.

Certainly this country can do better.

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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

There is a reason that journalists disclose their connections to subjects that they are reporting on.

It's not a problem to know that the author of the article is connected to the subject. It helps us evaluate the information for self-serving bias or it might cause us to trust the author's authority more.

I always appreciate when someone points it out.

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F.M.

Sunflower ,you are describing HSAs

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sunflower_petal(5a)

Ok, sounds similar though. From the OP:

They used an account called a Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA), providing funds employees could use to buy their own health insurance. These funds were not taxed as income to the employee, just as employer-provided insurance isn’t taxed.

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Ann

Veda, I completely agree with everything in your second paragraph. You're right, they aren't right for everyone and, thus, should not be chosen by everyone.

I don't need maternity care and there are a ton of things an old person needs coverage for that a young person doesn't. Choice is something I'm a big fan of! I understand there needs to be an avenue for the sickest and the poorest in our society but that avenue doesn't have to be to force every single person into precisely the same government controlled bucket.

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chase_gw

Yes that is what I understood it to be. It just smacks of a way for employers to pay less and employees to pay more. I experienced this at out company. Although we have universal healthcare it does not cover prescriptions , dental or vision.

Our employer eliminated their insurance coverage and gave us each a set amount that we could use to buy our own. No way could we replace what we had with the employer contribution...not even close. mostly becasue we were applying as individuals not as a group. We ended up having to go out of pocket to get what we had had before.

Not complaining as we could afford it but a young couple would have had a more difficult time or worse yet would have taken lesser coverage in the hopes they didn't need it.


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chase_gw

"I understand there needs to be an avenue for the sickest and the
poorest in our society but that avenue doesn't have to be to force every
single person into precisely the same government controlled bucket."

On that we can agree . It absolutely does not have to which is why I find blanket statements of universal healthcare uninformed. There are many. many ways of implementing it. Republicans always seem to fall back on choice and cost. Both those can be dealt with fairly and still accomplish universal affordable healthcare.

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Chi

"I don't need maternity care and there are a ton of things an old person needs coverage for that a young person doesn't. Choice is something I'm a big fan of!"

Allowing people to pick and choose what they need would be a nightmare. Are women who get pregnant going to pick a maternity plan? Which insurance company in their right mind would insure a maternity-specific plan knowing their costs are going to be far, far more than they ever make in premiums for those 9 months? What about cancer patients? Which insurance companies will volunteer to cover cancer plans knowing they can pay out well into the millions? None.

Bucketing old, young, healthy and sick people is the only way to get everyone covered.

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Ann

Joanie, short term plans are plans that can last from one to three years depending on state regulations. CA has a state regulation that doesn't allow them at all, but a great majority of states allow some version of them. Federal rules (put in place by the Trump administration) allow them for up to three years and allow them to not cover the Obamacare mandates. States, like mine has chosen to do, can add additional restrictions to the plans. The cost of these plans can be substantially lower (because they don't have to include everything the Obamacare legislation required of every insurance plan - within the exchanges or not).

But, they aren't something that will work for everyone. They are perfect for healthy retirees approaching Medicare age and needing insurance for a limited time between employer coverage and Medicare or for a young person between jobs who might need something for a year or so. Beyond 3 years, or 1 year in some states, they can't be renewed, so they aren't a good option for every person at every age.

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Ann

"Bucketing old, young, healthy and sick people is the only way to get everyone covered."

This is simply not true. It is not the only way. While it may be your preferred way, it is not the only way.

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Chi

"This is simply not true. It is not the only way. While it may be your preferred way, it is not the only way."

It's the only way that makes sense. Otherwise you are punishing people who get sick. What happens if a young person buys the young person plan but gets cancer? Would they need to buy the "cancer plan" and which insurance company would cover that? What if a woman thinks she doesn't want kids so she doesn't get the maternity coverage, but gets pregnant anyway and decides to keep the baby? Does she have to switch to the maternity plan? Which insurance companies will cover a pregnant woman knowing she will give birth eventually and cost into the tens of thousands and that's without complications?

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F.M.

"Bucketing old, young, healthy and sick people is the only way to get everyone covered."


Bucketing is how insurance works.

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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

Ann might not need maternity care, but it is in her interest for pregnant women to receive comprehensive care in order to safely deliver healthy babies. Those babies will be running things one day.

I do not yet need care for heart disease, high cholesterol, or diabetes but it is in my interest that the productive and beneficial and valuable members of society who need that care receive it. And I am not referring only to the work force; I believe all living beings to be of value to our planet.

It is to our mutual benefit as members of society to ensure that all our fellow members are healthy and safe.

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Chi

"Ann might not need maternity care, but it is in her interest for pregnant women to receive comprehensive care in order to safely deliver healthy babies. Those babies will be running things one day."

Additionally, having opt-in, more expensive maternity care will practically guarantee more abortions. Most people can't afford to pay cash for delivery, and the premiums for a maternity plan would be through the roof.

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chase_gw

Lindsey, great post. Having a healthy, well educated, populace is in all our best interests. It's confounding to me that so many don't seem to grasp that. Their perspective, in my view, is so narrow, so "me " centric.


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sunflower_petal(5a)

"Additionally, having opt-in, more expensive maternity care will practically guarantee more abortions. Most people can't afford to pay cash for delivery, and the premiums for a maternity plan would be through the roof. "

Trump doesn't think things all the way through so I'm not surprised that his minions and supporters might not as well.

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Ziemia(6a)

Some states, such as Colorado, have regulations in place to protect consumers from the worst aspects of ST plans.

This may give an overview of this:

https://www.healthinsurance.org/short-term-health-insurance/

More general info here

https://www.healthinsurance.org/so-long-to-limits-on-short-term-plans/

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batyabeth

National health insurance for all. Simple. It works in modern, healthy and well run countries all over the world. Yes, there are snags and problems, but nowhere, nowhere near the problems we as a country are experiencing without national health care. Bucketing is how insurance works. We are all in this together. You got something nice, good for you, that you can afford between employer coverage and a national insurance coverage plan!!!!! So how 'bout for everybody else?

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Prim Rose

I have a strong sense that those horrible measures the liberals put in place regarding short term plans was because those plans didn't meet basic requirements.

And yes, lucky so far. That's a dangerous financial risk, imo.

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maifleur01

Ann might not need maternity care but I had an eye opener when I was in HS. Went into a shop shortly after a supposedly 60 year old woman had a baby. The women were talking and one mentioned that the woman had been in her class in school and she was at least 4 years older than the news was stating. Older people do have sex and sometimes there are consequences. More normally it is an older husband with a slightly younger wife who either thought she was finished or wanted a child.

One of the interesting things I see with Medicare for all is that even with Medicare you need additional insurance. Part D is an easy example unless your additional insurance pays for it. Some do some don't. I would prefer some type of national insurance that covers everyone in this country for everything except that those countries that have similar programs seem to make most health care decisions for the patient rather than the patient deciding. While I have seen some terrible health care decisions made both by patients and families. I would like to have everyone to make their own decisions.

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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

"...those countries that have similar programs seem to make most health care decisions for the patient rather than the patient deciding..."

I'm not sure what this means, could you give some examples?

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chase_gw

I' m curious too.

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ubro(2a)

One of the interesting things I see with Medicare for all is that even with Medicare you need additional insurance.

Yes you do, we need separate insurance for dental, some medications, optometrist, massage, chiropractic care and a few I may have forgotten.

IMO the sense of peace, the feeling of security that one feels with a national health care plan is priceless. I for one, never ever worry about a person getting more out of the system than me, if they do I wouldn't trade places with any one of them. I will happily pay the extra taxes to insure that I too, if struck by a debilitating disease, will be cared for. If I don't get sick and have to use the money that is just fine, it really is a win, win situation.

ETA

While I have seen some terrible health care decisions made both by patients and families. I would like to have everyone to make their own decisions.

Which countries with a national health care program have the policy that the health care decisions are not made both by patients and families? Certainly not Canada.

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maifleur01

Since currently insurance companies can deny treatment why would a national system not be able to deny treatment. If you think it does not happen it only means it has not happened to you yet.

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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

I not only haven't experienced it, I haven't heard any examples either so if you have some I would like to be informed.

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chase_gw

Nor have I never, not ever, nor has any member of my family or friends. In fact I am not aware of any process that involves the government in any type of approval process. The exception being trial and experimental procedures .......they have to be approved.

All our procedures and treatments are aurhorized up front, before diagnosis , ....they are covered or they aren't. No debate.

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Ann

OMG, but one can need to wait years for a knee or hip replacement, and those are certainly not trial and experimental procedures!

Maifleur, when I went in for my recent physical, my doc was impressed that I saved so much money by bringing in my blood work from the health fair (and saved hundreds in that way). But, what he then told me really surprised me. He said if a person on Medicare doesn't have conditions that warrant certain blood tests (conditions like high cholesterol and other things), Medicare won't cover the blood work for that patient's annual physical and, if Medicare denies it, so will the supplementals, because those will only work with Medicare approved tests and procedures. So, he said he actually suggests the health fair to his super healthy seniors because, otherwise, he can't evaluate their health using blood tests. My husband will fall in this category because he's "in range" in every category. Shocked the heck out of me. But, makes me think you are likely right about potential denials of various sorts.

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F.M.

"...those countries that have similar programs seem to make most health care decisions for the patient rather than the patient deciding..."



LIke women and abortion?

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tryingtounderstand

Sheesh, not this issue again. Oh well, same old debate, arguments and facts, Universal health insurance works, but does have its pains and aches I.e. wait times. But absolutely no waits for emergencies and life threatening concerns plus No Bills or Fees Ever...

Trump is right to want to post drug prices. BUT big pharma, drug companies are wanting to sue in order to prevent him from doing this. Will he cave? https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/14/politics/drug-makers-hhs-lawsuit/index.html

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tryingtounderstand

On another note, we are just in the process of Of exploring Medicare. It’s sooo complicated. How does one even trust brokers or companies. It’s kind of like trying to trust a used car salesman.

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catticusmockingbird

We joined last year, but only have Part A. Dh is still working. Says he'll retire at the end of the year. Guess it's time to start researching supplemental insurance. It's all such a royal pain.

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watchmelol

and, if Medicare denies it, so will the supplementals, because those will only work with Medicare approved tests and procedures.

WRONG! Good Supplemental Plans will cover non Medicare approved procedures. Ours covers 80% after the deductible is met. Deductible 100.00 per individual/300.00 family with a maximum out of pocket of 1000.00. We pay zero co-pays. Had we gone onto a Medicare Advantage plan we would have already eaten a big chunk of our retirement savings. DH is currently in the hospital. he was perfectly healthy until last Wednesday. So far everything should be Medicare approved. But I have the peace of mind knowing we can go anywhere should the need arise.

You can pay now or you can pay later. No one is exempt from a major health event hitting therm at any time. Good health today could be poor health tomorrow.

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patriciae_gw(07)

Explain this "health fair" thing to me?

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chase_gw

"but one can need to wait years for a knee or hip replacement,"

Bull......and of course no link. Just random stuff

Wait times are an issue but not as described not even close. Of course where you live makes a difference. Guess rural vs urban is a non issue in the States, but it is here.

As I have said many times, and as my fellow Canadians would say, it's O K if I have to wait a bit if that means every single one on my fellow Canadians, no matter how rich or poor, can have what I can have when it comes to healthcare. I concept some just can't seem to grasp.

https://www.hqontario.ca/System-Performance/Wait-Times-for-Surgeries-and-Procedures/Wait-Times-for-Orthopedic-Surgeries-including-Hip-Replacement-and-Knee-Replacement/Time-from-Decision-to-Having-Orthopedic-Surgery

ETA we have this type of data available for all procedures and all hospitals .

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Stan Areted

Wait a bit more? More like beat feet to the US for many to pay for what one wants done rather than wait.

The "sacrifice" is hardly so for many.

Keep your socialized medicine.

I resent that my private insurance will change how they cover one day when I'm old enough to go to on Medicare.

It's NONE of the government's business what kind of tests or treatments I get or don't get, or to what extent.


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elvis

patriciae_gw(07)

Explain this "health fair" thing to me?

Our community has had them for years, yours doesn't? Maybe you just didn't pay attention. Here are a couple northern WI events:

Community Health Fair, Ascension, 601 S Center Ave, Merrill, Wisconsin 54452, Merrill, United States. Sat May 04 2019 at 08:00 am, Ascension Good Samaritan Health Center will hold a free Community Health Fair on Saturday, May 4

https://allevents.in/rockford/community-health-and-safety-fair/200016852558351

Apr 27, 2019 · Published on April 27, 2019 in Health MERRILL — Ascension Good Samaritan Health Center will hold a free Community Health Fair on May 4. The event, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 601 S. Center Ave. will provide free health screenings and additional …

https://wausaupilotandreview.com/2019/04/27/ascension-good-samaritan-hospital-to-hold-health-fair/

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Prim Rose

DH is currently in the hospital. he was perfectly healthy until last Wednesday. So far everything should be Medicare approved. But I have the peace of mind knowing we can go anywhere should the need arise.

I appreciate this honesty and gratitude about Medicare. Those who claim they want to do all these programs - SS et al - themselves haven't got a clue.

I wish your husband a good recovery.

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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

"It's NONE of the government's business what kind of tests or treatments I get or don't get, or to what extent."

Unless...wait for it... IT'S AN ABORTION!

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Chi

Right. Just like how the government shouldn't be allowed to dictate what someone does with their body when it comes to vaccines, but not abortion!

They don't want anyone to tell them what to do with their bodies but telling other people what they should do with theirs is fine.

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Ann

"WRONG! Good Supplemental Plans will cover non Medicare approved procedures. Ours covers 80% after the deductible is met. Deductible 100.00 per individual/300.00 family with a maximum out of pocket of 1000.00. We pay zero co-pays. Had we gone onto a Medicare Advantage plan we would have already eaten a big chunk of our retirement savings. DH is currently in the hospital. he was perfectly healthy until last Wednesday. So far everything should be Medicare approved. But I have the peace of mind knowing we can go anywhere should the need arise."

Watchme, respectfully, I disagree with you. Medigap programs will only cover Medicare approved expenses.

"Medicare supplement insurance plans, sometimes called Medigap, have been around almost as long as Medicare. They're sold by health insurance companies like us. They help people pay for their share of the costs for health care services covered by Medicare."

https://www.bcbsm.com/medicare/help/understanding-plans/supplement/coverage.html

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maifleur01

Since each state has different Medicare Supplement and Advantage plans most have a cap on the out of pocket amount. Even Medicare has a cap on what they will pay. If you only have Medicare and expect it to pay everything you are in for a great surprise.

As far as the routine tests that is where reading and picking the correct plan for you is important. Some that cost more will cover the lab tests. The cheaper ones will not. I know that once a year I will need an annual physical and part of that physical to be accurate is blood and other tests. When I was considering various plans to cut costs ones that covered those tests were the only ones I considered.

I was told that Medicare would not cover a certain test that the doctor wanted me to have but my health insurance would.

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Ann

Patric, in my state, we have a big health fair each year sponsored by a local TV station. It happens over the course of a month or so at multiple locations within each county (I went to a nearby church location). It's really rather nice (this year was my first year for trying it out). The are many options of blood tests and you can pick and choose. There were about 20 stations where they drew blood and my wait was about 10 minutes (I had registered and paid in advance). There are lots of medical professionals to answer questions on about 25 different medical categories for those interested (skin, eyes, ears, mental health, and on and on). They'll run standard tests like blood pressure, pulse, etc. When you leave, they hand out free gifts (like weekly pill containers and such). There are lots of volunteers getting people to the right rooms, etc. It's all very affordable!

Here is the website for the one in my state, in case you are still curious to learn more.


https://www.9healthfair.org/

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chase_gw

Nothing in there different from what I linked to from the official site and the first article is very clear on the fact that there are literally no waits times on emergent care.

So when will you provide a credible link to support the " years " you cited ? Or was that just random ?

ETA It's also important to note that the wait times are from the time a decision is made bewten the patient and doctor that surgery is required. In my experince that is done very early on if a patient is seeing a doctor regularly and not ignoring the signs.

My opthomologist caught my cataract very early. I waited 3 months but it never affected me because it was caught and scheduled early.

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Chi

I think it's funny that some of the Americans think they know the Canadian healthcare system better than the Canadians.

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tryingtounderstand

In the USA, HMO have more say in what dr you see, insurance companies even approve or don’t approve specific procedures or treatments. Indirectly, via added $$$ (penalty/fees) Insurance providers, also dictate which medical professional you see, depending if it’s in network , out of networks etc. This does not happen in Canada.

It would be interesting to get more opinions from ex-pat Americans living up north. These are the folk who truly understand both systems, as we have lived it. As In my case, as well as American SIL would definetly agree with me. His very conservative family were awe struck when they found out DD could take a whole year off for parental leave and give birth to their grandbabies with no cost.

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chase_gw

Chi, they know nothing other than sometnig from a website they find that they think supports their view........if is on the internet it must be true.

I have no clear understanding of how healthcare works in he States nor do I pretend to....but it does sound complicated

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patriciae_gw(07)

A health fair is what I supposed it to be.

If you were diagnosed with a systemic cancer, say lymphoma or Leukemia after your yearly check up, and yes you can have no idea in the world that you have this sort of disease, you are going to have to have full panel blood tests done every month or so before your Oncologist sees you to determine your treatment in that month. You do not get to wait for a Health Fair and you have to get the complete blood panel done for months on end. Some cheapo insurance plan that doesn't pay for that sort of thing is going to start looking expensive. It hasn't been that long ago that extending your life a couple of years is all you could hope for but now a days they have treatments that really make a difference but is this cheap insurance going to pay for any of that? You wont know until you are in those shoes. Only in America is it going to be a mystery in the first world. We are idiots.

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Ann

Chase, you're the one talking about emergent care, not me.

Here is what I said:

"OMG, but one can need to wait years for a knee or hip replacement, and those are certainly not trial and experimental procedures!"

Indeed, one can need to wait years. While 6 months might be more common (which is crazy to us in the U.S.), one can need to wait years, depending on where they live. Approximately 15,000 people annually are waiting longer than 6 months in Canada for these joint replacements. This article is 2 years old, but from what the other links are indicating, things haven't changed to any reasonable degree.

"Last month, Nova Scotia auditor general Michael Pickup sounded an alarm over the wait times. People in the province needing a hip replacement can expect to wait 750 days while a knee replacement can take 800 days, a number far above the national average of 182 days."

https://globalnews.ca/news/3339881/long-wait-times-for-surgery-depends-on-where-you-live/


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eageree

RE waits for joint replacements in USA - There is a well known Dr at a large local orthopedic practice. His specialty is knees and people need to wait months just to see him for evaluation. This is in a large urban area. So waits happen in the USA also.

Tryingtounderstand - yes, applying for Medicare can be overwhelming. A "broker" was referred to us by a friend and he made it so easy. I even called him when we were changing Part D and he helped me find the best plan even though he wasn't contracted with that plan. So hopefully you can find such a broker - perhaps a referral from a friend? Medicare offers a service for someone to talk to you on phone but we found that more confusing.

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chase_gw

My DH has to have special, ie not the basic blood tests, done every three months to monitor levels of a protein that may be a precursor to multiplemyloma ( sp? ). Does a health fair work for that ?

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elvis

According to data from the CIHI (2018) with respect to benchmarks set compared to actual wait times:

Radiation therapy: 93% to 100%

Knee replacement: 26% to 79%

Hip Fracture Repair: 79% to 94%

Cataract: 29% to 83%

Hip replacement: 49% to 88%

This was all provinces. Looks like some provinces are much more desirable than others for medical care.

http://waittimes.cihi.ca/

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chase_gw

Ann, I only mentioned emergent care to remove it from the conversation at hand.

I see the article you linked to , as you mentioned, are two years old. Can you imagine your reaction of I cited a two year old poll !!!

None the less both say basically what I said....depends where you live and from your link...

"Overall in Canada, three out of four patients get the care they need within benchmark wait times — the amount of time considered appropriate to wait for a procedure. " ..and those benchmark wait times are less than 6 months

Anyhow I'm done wth you on this. You have your mind made up and information will not change it...

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Ann

Did someone imply a health fair does more than it does or in any way replaces a doc? I simply chose to use a health fair for blood work prior to a physical (with my doc) because I knew what coverage my plan covered for an annual physical, and the common bloodwork done as part of a physical would have been out of pocket.

One would certainly go to a doc for multiple myeloma symptoms or leukemia, which by the way, both of which would be covered under my short term plan (unless pre-existing in which case I would not have been allowed/accepted to enroll in that particular plan).

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ubro(2a)

As to the wait times it depends, but I have first hand experience with 3 family members diagnosed with cancer and the access to Ultrasound, MRI, CAT scans, biopsy, and finally chemo, and radiation was immediate. My mother broke her hip twice in 6 weeks and both times immediate surgery, and home care nurse visits were supplied when she was discharged.

When you get a mammogram in my area you wait for the all clear before you even take off your paper dress, if there is a problem you are immediately sent to the more in-depth scan. A follow up letter is sent to you as well as your doctor stating if any more scans or treatment is required. They send you the letter to mitigate any mixups and misplacement by the doctor or clinic. They don't want a woman to miss treatment because of an error in communication. Women can book a yearly mammogram on their own, they do not need a doctors note.

I have no problem waiting for a non emergent procedure if there is a person with a more pressing problem who needs my spot.


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chase_gw

There were no symptoms. The protein level was detected as part of an annual physical in which the doctor ordered comprehensive blood work.. Perhaps the health fairs do that too....I don't know.

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Ann

"and those benchmark wait times are less than 6 months"

Aren't the benchmark wait times for knee and hip replacements 6 months? Have they been recently reduced to less than 6 months?

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chase_gw

Ubro, we get it. Some don't....their loss and they don't even know it.

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Ann

The health fairs don't do anything with the results of the blood work but provide it to the person who ordered and paid for it. I used it to take to my physical and I went with a friend who simply wanted it for her own info. She likes to track all that stuff all the time - more often than her annual physical.

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chase_gw


"The health fairs don't do anything with the results of the blood work but provide it to the person who ordered and paid for it"

That's not what I asked. I asked if they do comprehensive blood tests, a level that would measure protein levels. There are multiple levels of blood work.

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bleusblue2

Stan Areted

Wait a bit more? More like beat feet to the US for many to pay for what one wants done rather than wait.

The "sacrifice" is hardly so for many.

Keep your socialized medicine.

~~~~

ha ha -- thanks I will -- take a poll of Canadians. They wouldn't trade with you.

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watchmelol

Ann

Straight from my policy.

This plan provides coverage from any licensed physician anywhere in the world, and pays Medicare Part A and Part B deductibles and co-insurance for all Medicare-approved services. This plan covers some services not covered by Medicare.

You will have lower costs if you use a provider who accepts Medicare assignment and is a Blue Shield PPO network provider.

As a Medicare Supplement plan, this plan coordinates with Medicare. Many of the expenses that are covered by Medicare are paid at 100% of the Medicare Allowable Amount. Many of the non-Medicare approved services are first subject to the deductible and are covered at 80%.

DeductibleMedicare-Approved: Deductibles Waived
Non-Medicare Approved: $100 per individual/$300 family

Out-of-Pocket MaximumMedicare-Approved or Non-Medicare Approved: $1,000 per individual

It was a plan offered to retirees of the company my husband retired from. Our cost was $1400+ per month (so not inexpensive at all!).

That sounds like a supplemental plan where you are paying the full premium yourselves. How is it a retiree benefit from an employer if they are not contributing to the premium?



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Stan Areted

ha ha -- thanks I will -- take a poll of Canadians. They wouldn't trade with you.


I wouldn't trade with them right now, we're all happy!


Thanks for posting the policy info, watchmelol.


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ubro(2a)

I wouldn't trade with them right now, we're all happy!

I would rephrase that if I were you, reports then of how many people go bankrupt for medical reasons are false? I am sure they are not happy.

As to the wait times for hip and knee surgery, people go in order of need, if someone is in more need of one than another they will go first. Doctors know this and put a patient on a list sometimes before the problem becomes acute, things are not always as they seem.

We have in place a system of prevention, preventing the disease saves money.

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batyabeth

"it's O K if I have to wait a bit if that means every single one on my
fellow Canadians, no matter how rich or poor, can have what I can have
when it comes to healthcare"

^^^^ this. Bless you, thins is how I think also. The anti-health care folks (and they are anti-health care if they are against their fellow citizens having equal access) will never understand, and will try again and again to prevent all Americans from basic, affordable, equal health care. Beggars the imagination as to why, but there it is.

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Stan Areted

I don't know of anyone that does not want everyone to have equal access.

I also don't know of anyone that wants to pay for health care for people that couuld pay for it themselves as some do but don't make the sacrificial decisions necessary to pay for your own health care or your own insurance, or procure a job that pays for it, and shows up and wants the same thing others have without putting any effort or money into it.

Why don't people ever look in the mirror for their own needs?

Why is "society" considered a failure when it is quite often the person complaining the most that is the failure?

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sunflower_petal(5a)

Of course I want people to pay for it themselves if they are capable. Any social safety net program - food stamps, medicaid, unemployment insurance - should be monitored for its effective ability to help people when they need it and lift them back into self-sufficiency as soon as possible.

Why are people who need help broad-brushed with the paint that they are choosing to be in this situation when in fact only a small percentage of people abuse it.

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floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

"I also don't know of anyone that wants to pay for health care for people that couuld pay for it themselves."

And there we have encapsulated the enormous and fundamental gulf in understanding on this issue. With universal health care there isn't anybody that could pay for themselves but doesn't. Everyone pays according to their means but they don't receive according to their means. We all benefit equally. Nobody pays for health care for anyone who could pay but won't because everyone must contribute. The sense of ownership and pride in the service which this gives us is apparently beyond the comprehension of some people.

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bleusblue2

tan Areted

ha ha -- thanks I will -- take a poll of Canadians. They wouldn't trade with you.

I wouldn't trade with them right now, we're all happy!

~~~~

of course you are speaking for yourself. Carry on.

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ubro(2a)

I also don't know of anyone that wants to pay for health care for people that couuld pay for it themselves as some do but don't make the sacrificial decisions necessary to pay for your own health care or your own insurance, or procure a job that pays for it, and shows up and wants the same thing others have without putting any effort or money into it.

How is it certain a person can get a job that pays insurance? If the employer refuses and you need the money it is somehow your fault that you are not insured when it is a choice between a job and no job? Then of course, if they choose no job these people will be scorned for living off the system. With some conservatives there is no way to win. The disconnect with reality is astounding.

I agree with floral's comment on this, I will add, everyone pays thru taxes, no one does not pay.

Do you get to golf with Trump? Your taxes certainly pay for his privilege to do so. I would think those taxes would be better spent on people who need healthcare.


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floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

Exactly what I said above, Ubro. No one gets away with not paying. All contribute through the tax system according to their means.

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Ann

Chase, I don't know if the blood tests test protein. There are lots of different tests to choose from and one can choose as few or as many as they want to. I do know the doc was looking at lymphocyte numbers on my test the year before and it wasn't on the one from the health fair, but he wasn't concerned he didn't have it this year. Once I'm on Medicare, as he pointed out to me, the only tests covered will be the ones where something in my past record indicates the need for it. So, in the case of your husband, testing for the protein numbers would be covered, but not for me, unless it was a part of another blood panel that I needed for something I have (like high cholesterol).

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Ann

Watchme, you have not given me any new info. These supplemental (or Medigap) plans may cover things like out of country medical expenses or Silver Sneakers (which Part B without a supplemental doesn't) and they'll cover deductibles and co-pays which will lower your overall cost (and sometimes significantly), but they apply to expenses and services which are Medicare approved only. For example, if Medicare won't cover a shingles shot, neither will your supplemental. (I'm thinking the doc just told me the two dose shingles shot is not covered by Medicare but I'm not 100% on that). If the doc orders lots of blood work for my husband (who has all in range numbers and no illnesses), and Medicare Part B denies coverage, so will the Plan G Supplemental we'll be getting when on Medicare.

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Ann

"That sounds like a supplemental plan where you are paying the full premium yourselves. How is it a retiree benefit from an employer if they are not contributing to the premium?"

We weren't/aren't on Medicare yet so this had nothing to do with a supplemental plan. For retirees, the company no longer contributes to a person's premium, but still lets the person pay the premium the very large group rate provides. The company pays part of that premium for employees and none of it for retirees - but both groups get the "group" rate. This rate is very close to what we could get on the Obamacare exchanges, so we can go either way. We don't really gain or lose anything with either choice. Of course, we'll save money once on Medicare with a Supplemental (which is a darn good thing because we both paid into Medicare for all our working years). We, like the rest of the Medicare recipients, will be happy to get the benefit we've paid for.

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Ann

"As to the wait times for hip and knee surgery, people go in order of need, if someone is in more need of one than another they will go first. Doctors know this and put a patient on a list sometimes before the problem becomes acute, things are not always as they seem."

No thanks to this! Thinking about this, I wonder why there aren't enough docs of every specialty to better handle wait times. Free market systems handle this supply/demand situation far better than government run systems (in my strong opinion). Again, a big no thanks to this.

Please, oh please - let Trump be the winner in 2020 - so this doesn't become our country's future!

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elvis

Ann, red yeast rice supplement helped lower DH's cholesterol remarkably. I wonder if you've tried it.


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sunflower_petal(5a)

I don't know why people don't think there aren't wait times in the US. I could not get a knee replacement surgery tomorrow if I wanted one. I'd still have to be scheduled for it according to both my doctor's and the surgical center's schedule.

The fastest physical appointment I could get with my regular doctor was 3 months out because they only schedule them in the mornings and they were all booked up.

The US is not the wonderland of fast appointments that people think it is.

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chase_gw

It is mind boggling to me that some are totally consumed by self and have little or no regard for their fellow citizens. I would gladly wait, and have, for non emergent care knowing that no fellow Canadian has to live a life of debilitating pain because they can't afford the insurance or have to live on tax payer disability payments . It's worth it to me that every Canadian has access to preventative and diagnostic healthcare, yearly exams and required tests. I recognize that others do not see that as important.

We live longer, our babies die at a lesser rate , our obesity rates are lower and we beat the US in most healthcare metrics.

The tax payer pays for it's unhealthy population one way or another...some just don't care as long as they don't see it.

Universal healthcare will come one way or another, sooner rather than later. As more and more Americans, including Republicans, come to demand an improved healthcare system.......currently polling as the number one issue is some polls, as it was in the midterms.

ETA Universal healthcare doesn't have to be modeled on any other countries...there are so many options.Ours is not perfect and I don't t recall any Canadian as portraying it that way but it's damn good , damn good.

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watchmelol

Well a Ann to me an insurance company paying 80% of a non medicare approved service IS coverage. If they paid nothing then it would be like you say. But if my doctor orders something that is non medicare approved our supplemental insurance will pick up 80% of the cost once the deductible has been met which is low in our plan.

But it's a moot point because you would be hard pressed to find very many non medicare approved services in my area. Perhaps if I lived in a remote area it might be different.

Knee and hip replacement surgery in the US metropolitan areas has become a cash cow. There may be a wait to get in to be seen initially but once seen there is very little wait time.

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tryingtounderstand

@Ann, not to worry, regardless of who wins( Repub.. or dem)now or in the future, the USA will never have universal health coverage. Sheesh, drug companies are now threatening to sue Trump as all he wants to do is list drug prices. Hopefully, he will not cave! Further, Insurance companies, will never give up their market share, nor would marketing agencies.

By the way wait times for replacement surgery can be curtailed. See your dr at first signs of hip, knee etc pain, who then puts u on wait list when pain is tolerable and there is not an immediate need for replacement surgery. No need to suffer!

has to be a better way between the Canadian and the USA systems. Both have major issues and constraints!

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chase_gw

"There may be a wait to get in to be seen initially but once seen there is very little wait time."

If you have the coverage or money to get in in the first place........

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Kathy

This site has some reliable statistics on healthcare around the world.

https://www.healthsystemtracker.org/chart-collection/how-do-healthcare-prices-and-use-in-the-u-s-compare-to-other-countries/


If someone has no insurance they needn’t worry about wait times for knee replacements or anything else. It’s not going to happen for them.

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floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

It is beyond ironic that if only you had a universal health system you wouldn't need charity health fairs. You'd just go to your doctor.

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chase_gw

This ought to be good...more likely ignored.

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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

I hope not ignored...

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maddie260

The hypocrisy is overwhelming. I got mine, but...

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Ann

"Ann, red yeast rice supplement helped lower DH's cholesterol remarkably. I wonder if you've tried it."

Elvis, yes, twice a day for about 10 years now (and over the years, I've tracked it and found it reduces mine by about 30 points). But, high cholesterol runs in my family, so the doc isn't terribly surprised. But, mine is high enough he had me do an artery scan because I told him I really did not want to go on a statin. The good news is, 0 blockage, which is fantastic. So, now he'll do that again in 5 years and after the scan, he doesn't care that my cholesterol is almost 300. I still take my red yeast rice twice a day, though.

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ubro(2a)

I find it silly that something none emergent such as knee and hip replacement is the benchmark for wait times. Yes they can be painful, but those people who need it most get help first and all others wait. If you are so selfish as to demand you get treatment before another who's need is more pressing then there is nothing to say except OMG!

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Ann

Webuser, I didn't deny anyone the use of a health fair. You clearly have not been to one and have no idea what you are talking about.

The cost for each test is cash only, no insurance accepted, the same price for everyone, out of pocket, open to all, and plenty of availability and locations for anyone and everyone who wants to attend. The keep it affordable by not having location expenses, personnel expenses, using volunteers (who advertise their clinics, offices, pharmacies, etc. with free pens and such - hoping to get future new patients and customers), and lots of senior citizen volunteers who love to participate. The people who attend aren't the poor and needy, but tons of senior citizens who watch their health carefully, like the advice, go with friends, make an outing of it, etc.

Try one sometime and you'll understand what they are and why they exist. They're educational and fun, actually. It's like a community thing, where people meet one another, staff and nurses from medical offices, labs, and pharmacies introduce themselves to the community and generate business, people who love to volunteer and educate do so, etc. You've got it all wrong!

ETA:

"This ought to be good...more likely ignored."

Chase, was it good? Do you feel kind of embarrassed for your snarky lack of understanding?

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Ann

"Yes they can be painful, but those people who need it most get help first and all others wait."

Several comments similar to this one. I'll ask again, why doesn't Canada simply employ more docs/specialists to better fill the medical needs of the citizens? What is the problem?! Do docs not want the jobs in Canada? If so, what is the problem? Is it government controlled pay scales?

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Searchresults

Health fairs are public health programs and interventions. They are intended to serve the poor, disenfranchised and under served. They don’t have unlimited resources and supplies so it is possible that your use limited others. It’s not entertainment. The fun atmosphere helps encourage people to come who might not use the doctor or be able to afford one.

The most popular health fairs in Colorado are organized by a non profit that relies on sponsors and donations to provide services.

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chase_gw

" why doesn't Canada simply employ more docs/specialists to better fill the medical needs of the citizens? "

Doctors aren't employed by the government, were did you get that idea? . They are in private practice. The government doesn't employ them.......they can't hire them.

The issue isn't so much the availability of doctors as it is access to hospital facilities such as operating rooms. More serious conditions get priotity access to operating rooms , recovery rooms and nursing staff.

Elective surgery has less access. That's where the bottle neck comes in for non emergent procedures. For example ophthalmologists have access one day a week to operating rooms for cataract surgery in our local hospital.

Similiar restrictions would exist for non emergent orthopedic care.....only so many hours per week would be available in the hospital.

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tryingtounderstand

Fear not, dr. Shortages Is also a growing concern in the USA. There is a dr shortage in Canada and in the USA. Yet, There is no shortage of students trying to get into med. schools. Universities cannot expand their programs as there is a shortage of residencies. In Canada, universities want to ensure each grad has a residency available to them. This is not always the case in the USA.

The rise in American medical schools’ enrolment numbers is sparking similar concerns in the US. A survey by the Association of American Medical Colleges found that 78% of medical school deans are concerned about the ability of incoming students to find residency positions of their choice nationwide. The problem could end up being worse there because unlike in Canada, where provincial governments control the number of residency positions, in the US any hospital can set up a residency program and determine how many residents will be admitted. “It’s much more like the Wild West,” says Moineau. “You end up with more unfilled positions and unmatched grads.” https://cmajnews.com/2018/10/03/if-canada-needs-more-doctors-why-hasnt-medical-school-enrolment-increased-cmaj-109-5649/


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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

Our town (population 80,000) just had to close its maternity ward because two of the obstetricians in town went on leave unexpectedly and there are not enough to staff in case of emergencies.

No obs want to make the looong 40 minute drive (/sarcasm) from the next community over so, the ward closes and labouring moms get to make that looong drive. The obs can't be forced to make that trip, because THEY ARE NOT HIRED BY THE GOVERNMENT.

Terrible situation for my community as you can imagine. The local midwives petitioned the health authority to keep the mat ward open for low risk moms, with medium and high risk mothers being sent on, but the health authority said no it was too much risk.

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Ann

Lindsey, that most definitely sounds like a situation, no doubt.

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maddie260

I'm over this. We can do these blood tests for everyone, not just Ann. Why can they afford to do it for her and not for everyone? We are being fleeced as a nation.

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eageree

I've been following this thread as I have worked (volunteered) the health fair that OP talks about. I have also given vouchers for free lab work at the fair when I worked at a non profit who served low income and those in need. This fair is a great benefit for all parts of our state. Lots of hard work all year by volunteers and paid staff to have 2 events per year state wide. Working in the health care industry I've seen many people without insurance or insurance with high deductible use this service - this was mainly before ACA and our state expanded Medicaid. This lead me to research the break down of insurance status of the participants. What I found was from 2017: over 50,000 participants. Employer based insurance 29.42%, Medicare/Medicaid 33.09%, Self purchased 28.11%, no insurance 12%.

I was surprised at the no insurance group - would have expected that to be higher but I'm guessing this population doesn't realize that there are vouchers for them to get free lab work. Perhaps they are working their low wage jobs when the fairs are happening.

As the website says, these fairs are for everyone. I don't know if people are turned away because the lines are too long. I do know, based on the fair I worked, that lines are long but the organizers are very efficient in their crowd control. I did not see any advertisements for health providers at the clinic I worked. There are also many free screenings available at the fairs - not everyone does the lab work.

I am neither defending nor opposing the OP - just trying to state some facts as it was mentioned that none of the posters had probably been to such a fair.

If interested in more info from the 2017 annual report - its 15 pages long - I think you can find it at this link - file:///C:/Users/julea/AppData/Local/Packages/microsoft.windowscommunicationsapps_8wekyb3d8bbwe/LocalState/Files/S0/6339/Attachments/2017AnnualReport_15Nov18_FINAL-compressed[7788].pdf


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maifleur01

I would question how many seniors do not have a problem that does not need blood work. Most women over a certain age have high cholesterol simply because they are women and their natural protection diminishes. Sadly the ones that used to go to all of the free things and brag about going all had enough money to cover any costs. The ones that did not have the money did not go because they were of the generation that health fairs and other free things were public assistance.

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eageree

As to average age - the 2017 annual report showed it was 59 that year.

I have to disagree about the comment of the revenue of these fairs and generating business. The lab that does the lab work probably breaks even. Many of the locations are in churches, low income clinics, community centers - donated spaces. 9health fair is after all a non profit and many of the volunteers are doing it for the good of the community. It is NOT to generate business.

Also - RE Medicare not covering some lab work if no history of a problem, such as high cholesterol. They do cover a lipid panel every 5 years no matter what.

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miss lindsey (still misses Sophie)(8a)

"The health fair is for everybody and anybody."

Of course it is. That's not really in dispute.

Universal health care is for everybody and anybody too. Like one, long, extended health fair. But with regular checkups and emergency care. And continual monitoring of chronic and developing conditions. And prevention. And depending on where you live, access to alternative care like physiotherapy, counseling, accupuncture, chiropractic.

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rob333 (zone 7a)

If we go to universal healthcare there cannot be any of this, I've got mine you get yours crap. EVERYONE has to put into the pot. There cannot be some dumb voucher system or those who wait until they need care. That's not how it can succeed. That's how it will fail.

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Kathy

Eageree, thank you for your donation of time to work at a health fair. It is because of these volunteers they reach people who otherwise may not be able to take advantage of a full exam. Not everyone can even afford Obamacare which is still costly even when subsidized.

BTW, I have never been told Medicare won’t pay for an annual blood panel. It does pay only once a year unless warranted.

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elvis

EVERYONE has to put into the pot.

How?

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chase_gw

Just like it is done now. A combination of premiums and taxes .....but by everyone.

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floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

Here it's done via taxes including one called National Insurance. Everyone pays. No separate premiums.

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Ziemia(6a)

Web User 825 -

Did not know that about red Yeast Rice Extract

Thanks

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Ann

Ziemia, I do know you should not take Red Yeast Rice while taking a statin! But, if one is not taking prescription medication for high cholesterol, it can be an excellent option. In fact, I have a child with high cholesterol and their doc recommended Red Yeast Rice first. When the reduction in cholesterol wasn't sufficient with RYR, they discontinued it and moved to a prescription, but it was the first thing they tried. Regular daily use of RYR lowers mine by about 30 points (which isn't amazing, but still quite helpful). If you ever think about giving it a try, I suggest starting slowly as it can cause stomach cramps if the dose is too much for your system. I take it twice a day to avoid that problem by just popping open the 600 mg capsule and sprinkling half on my tongue in the AM and the remaining half in the PM. It tastes fine with a swig of water.

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rob333 (zone 7a)

EVERYONE has to put into the pot.

How?


Great question. One I still don't know the answer to. What's a good way? Right now, our employers pay part, and the employees pay part. Taxes also pay it. What changes would you like to see to move towards the goal of repairing healthcare?


Chase/floral-Just because it's been done that way, doesn't mean it's the only way. I wonder if there's something better. Maybe not, but maybe we could think outside the box. Who knows! The sky is the limit :)

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floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK

I don't think either of us said it's the only way. We just answered the question 'how'? We explained how it's done where we are to show that it can be done. Nobody implied you shouldn't think outside the box.

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HU-941641755

Health fairs are open to all. Their goal is to improve every
member of the community’s health. It’s a national campaign to screen and
educate, with a mission of prevention and early detection. These fairs are
community health initiatives, not clinics set up for “poor people” as claimed
above. It undermines their national wellness campaign to deter people from
attending by trying to shame anyone else from attending.

Confirmed and copied directly from the health fair website mentioned above:

Is 9Health Fair only for the underprivileged who can’t afford to go to the doctor?

No. 9Health Fair is for everyone. We have the supplies and resources to serve everyone who attends. Our mission is to reach as many people as possible to help them take ownership of their health. We have a special voucher program for those who cannot afford screenings at 9Health Fair.

About 9Health Fair Today

9Health Fair is the largest volunteer-driven, non-profit health, wellness and prevention effort in the nation. Our mission is to raise health awareness and provide people with the tools they need to take responsibility for their health. Thanks to the support of more than 16,000 statewide volunteers, we’ve helped save thousands of lives by providing affordable and convenient screenings and health education. We’ve proudly impacted more than 1.7 million individuals since inception who took the time to learn more about their health and take control of their lives.

We now offer digital tools, in addition to our fairs, to help people on their path to
better health. Our 9Health eTools programs offer two options to help people make the lifestyle changes they need with the support of their own health coach.

9Health, Your Year-Round Prevention Partner

Now more than ever, our health is in our own hands. But you are not alone – 9Health, your community non-profit organization is here to support you on your health journey.

For 40 years, 9Health has brought communities together to provide preventive health education and the most comprehensive screenings at 9Health Fairs across the state. 9Health offers the same great health fairs we always have, plus so much more!

Today, you can count on 9Health for science-based effective health information, access to health professionals and health screenings, health education from local medical experts, digital health eTools and support year-round from your 9Health Community.

I have insurance, is it still necessary to attend?

Many people find that attending a 9Health Fair provides more information than their providers’ offices typically order. Some participants report that the co-pay to make a doctor’s visit costs more than attending a 9Health Fair. In addition, you can take advantage of a variety of free screenings.

Why does 9News have a health fair?

9News is our media partner, but 9Health Fair is a separate non-profit organization with the sole mission of providing people with the tools they need to take responsibility for their own health. 9Health Fair was started as a community service project of 9News in 1980, and 9Health Fair became an independent non-profit in 1987.

Interactive Educational Centers

Interactive Educational Centers (IECs) play integral roles at 9Health Fair. IECs are comprised of many different local and statewide organizations that provide a wide range of up-to-date health, wellness, and safety information and education for the community. By providing accurate and credible literature and hands-on demonstrations, IECs help participants to understand the relationship between positive lifestyles and their overall health. Most of all, they help advance health awareness by providing people with the tools they need to take responsibility for their own health, the 9Health Fair mission.

The IEC program is an excellent opportunity to connect with local communities, organizations, and volunteers to provide a community service that is focused on one single, extraordinary cause – Your Community’s Health!

There is no charge to be a 9Health Fair IEC. The program is for the health and education of the community, not for business or clientele expansion/promotion. IEC representatives are not allowed to treat, perform screenings, make diagnoses or provide referrals of any kind, regardless of their qualifications. All applicants are screened by our Medical Advisory Committee, a statewide representation of medical experts, who guide 9Health Fair in providing quality and evidence-based health education to our community.

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