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kennady12

modern farmhouse

5 years ago
I would like some input/ ideas on how to more incorporate a modern farmhouse theme with our new home .

Comments (66)

  • 5 years ago
    Thank you Lyfia . Those are all great most we are already doing but a few I’m going to check into . I’ve never seen 1x8 trim but interested in how it would look . May not be good for smaller areas .
  • 5 years ago

    "She just so happens to love the modern farmhouse look so I thought I’d try to get more ideas on here . Looks like I probably shouldn’t have . I really had no idea there was such a thing as people being butt hurt over people making their homes look like a farm house as much as possible. It’s rather strange to me ."

    Sorry I wasn't able to articulate my intentions more clearly. I had hoped I would be able to communicate that my comment was *not* an indication of my opinion about you or your home.

    I was not "butt hurt," but rather attempting to clarify the vocabulary for you and other readers so that you can use search terms that will get you the look you want. Some people are interested in learning new concepts.

    I'm unclear why you felt that anyone was commenting on your financial situation or careers.

    Search for Modern Farmhouse on this and other sites. You'll get lots of inspiration.

    If you want the house to function the way a farmhouse does: make the kitchen and bathrooms super efficient. Choose flooring that can take a beating and don't worry too much if it gets dirty. Be comfortable with neighbours and family dropping in at all hours; don't expect a knock.

    Good luck with your build and again, all the best in your new home.


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  • 5 years ago

    Just google fantasy farmhouse and have at it. Nothing about the current fad is very real. Just like the Tuscan look was all faux painting too many corbels and nothing about actual Tuscany.

  • 5 years ago

    A house is a huge investment and it’s a very personal purchase. That’s a great recipe for tender feelings. If I were the OP, I would spend a lot of time googling the ideas presented here and maybe start a Pinterest board, so I could easily see trends of what I like and don’t like all laid out on a single page. The more thought you put into this, the less money you will waste. Be very careful of creating change orders for your builder. Those add up quickly and are super expensive to begin with.

    My two cents on the modern farmhouse is you want big open spaces with simple trims.

    Good luck with your project and congratulations on building a house for yourself and your family.

  • 5 years ago
    Nothing to do with your farmhouse question, but I’m just curious....I have never seen a home being built this way....various windows being installed, but the roof and the rest of the exterior walls aren’t even finished. Roof not on nor is the framing done, but part of the siding has already been installed. Is this a little unusual?
  • PRO
    5 years ago

    Have you read the thread on this forum, "An Example of a Farmhouse"?


    If not, you should.

  • PRO
    5 years ago

    Different builders sequence the building process in different ways. I am developing a process where the shingles are installed first, then the rest of the construction is done under the shelter of the shingles. Development is going slow.

  • 5 years ago
    Homes are always built like this around here . Framers build the walls sheathing , siding , soffits and the stand them up .
  • 5 years ago

    Nidnay - I noticed that too and it had me scratching my head. My guess is that those gable pieces were pre-assembled. That doesn't explain those other windows already being in, though.

  • 5 years ago

    I think it's sweet that you want to build a house that your wife will love. :-)


    I also think that the "Modern Farmhouse" really is an aesthetic and the pics that Beth showed above are good examples.


    That style of house with the wood siding, board and batten, porches, metal roofs, etc. is very popular in my town and I think they are very nice looking homes.


    From your pic above, it looks like you are already on your way to getting that look. Good luck with your build.


  • 5 years ago

    Wall assemblies that are not dried in under roof shouldn't have windows installed. Jojo's lemming look is the least of the issues here.

  • 5 years ago
    What are the issues ? Our last house was built the same way , no issue
  • 5 years ago

    No issue, just not what some of us are used to seeing. I'm used to seeing the wall framing, roof, THEN windows and exterior detailing.

  • PRO
    5 years ago

    Terms which create the "Cringe Factor":


    --Homes are always built like this around here...

    --My neighborhood is full of homes like this...

    --The contractor said that's normal, and I had nothing to worry about...

    --After all, what could go wrong...

    --We're going to have a few change orders and extra costs...

    --We're going to be the owner-builders and have just a few questions...

    --What's a change order...


  • 5 years ago
    There are a lot of modern farmhouses going up everywhere. I think you would want to add a personal touch so your house doesn't look like all the other ones. I personally don't like to have my house look like any other house in the neighborhood.
  • PRO
    5 years ago

    "...There are a lot of modern farmhouses going up everywhere..."


    Never turn you back on an empty piece of ground...


    Next thing you know, there's Shabby Chic everywhere.

  • 5 years ago

    My take on this is that the trusses aren't ready and the contractor is just trying to move along while waiting for the truss delivery. If it were my house I would do the same thing rather than put everything on hold waiting for the trusses.

  • 5 years ago
    Sindy not around here . We have found three modern farm houses in our area
  • 5 years ago

    Different builders sequence the building process in different ways. I am developing a process where the shingles are installed first, then the rest of the construction is done under the shelter of the shingles. Development is going slow.


    ^^^This HAS to make ARG's 2019 list...



    OP

    take this crowd with a grain of salt, and some thick skin. You're on the right track, and can get some INVALUABLE info here!! Just keep plucking away at the pictures on Houzz, Pinterest & Instagram, you'll get it! And THEN, plan a trip to Waco with your wife. She'll thank you.

  • 5 years ago

    "I really had no idea there was such a thing as people being butt hurt over people making their homes look like a farm house as much as possible. It’s rather strange to me ".....OMG yes!!!

  • PRO
    5 years ago

    My goodness................my head hurts from reading this stuff.


    Country French covers a wide latitude

    Same with Mediterranean style & Country English style also.

    Farmhouse style has the same wide latitude and might last longer than most styles because it's American based and eclectic.


  • 5 years ago

    What ugly comments have been so needlessly made here. It's embarrassing.


    Beverly is right.

  • 5 years ago

    I just noticed an article from AIA [American Institute of Architects] recognizing the style

    https://www.aia.org/articles/145321-designing-the-modern-farmhouse:36

  • 5 years ago
    Cedar/wood porch ceiling is a nice, warm touch! Definitely ignore the haters; I tried my best on that other thread that’s been referenced to explain why the sense of superiority regarding the term “modern farmhouse” is unjustified...to no avail :)
  • 5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I just noticed an article from AIA [American Institute of Architects] recognizing the style

    lol That's an advertisement by and for James Hardie Building Products for their HardiePlank siding.

  • 5 years ago

    BT, that house reminds me of the house Steve Martin built in the movie Housesitter. That movie was made in 1992! Wasn’t that a “Modern Farmhouse”?






  • 5 years ago

    Before hitting SUBMIT on your comments, ask yourself if what you've written makes you feel proud and if you'd like to be on the receiving end of it.


    As others have said, it's embarrassing the way some have treated the OP so poorly.

  • 5 years ago
    kennady I'm in Los Angeles... almost every new home is a modern farmhouse (usually in white and black) versus a modern boxy smooth stucco or concrete home with wood accents, it's immensely popular here! that's not a bad thing but hopefully you can put your own stylistic touch on it before it catches on in your area.
  • PRO
    5 years ago

    What was the question again??

  • 5 years ago
    Thank you all , how about plumbing fixtures ? Is there a finish that better fits this style?
  • PRO
    5 years ago

    wood doors, wood flooring wood anything and everything always gives off a nice farmlike design.

  • 5 years ago

    Kennady - I think black or oil rubbed bronze look nice with the look you are going for.


  • PRO
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    “Farm style”, as a decor style, is basically your great gramma’s house, cleaned up and painted up fresh a bit. Much of her clutter is gone, but plenty of what remains has a Collected Over Time look. That means a variety of finishes in both the metals, woods, counters, and almost every other permanent surface.

    It can be disjointed without a good overall plan to pull it together. If you have concerns over a cohesive result, I’d suggest buying some software and learning how to create room visualizations to help you not go down that disjointed road. Or work with a design professional who already has that software and those skills. And who has the experience to pull it off well without moving into the TV kitsch look that is getting the negative reactions above.

    Or, think about embracing a more disjointed result deliberately, so it’s planned less, and more deliberately haphazard, just like great gramma’s house evolved. Think of a victorian’s collector unfitted style vibe rather than simple and clean, and more modernized. Personal collections, lots of textiles, pattern, and old furniture is a big part of that look, and looks great against a unified warm neutral palette. Good luck with your project!

  • 5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I am a chrome girl. I’m sure there will be others that disagree but imo chrome is classic, beautiful and will never go out of style. Original old farmhouses don’t have black or orb.

    I have used an old lacquer free brass tap in a powder room sink in a very old farmhouse in my previous home and loved it with the other things I had in there. But other than that had chrome everywhere else and loved it.

  • 5 years ago

    "Modern farmhouse" is not just a replicated farmhouse.

    It's more of achieving a feeling that's evocative of, well, coziness and family and comfortable living and nothing really too formal. So to all the purists: ease up a little...you know what the op means, really. He no more needs a lesson than you need an interpretation. We all get it.


    I think you want to know how you can make your home have a similar "feeling" to that which the word "farmhouse" brings to mind.

    For example, oil rubbed bronze fixtures...they were not used in farmhouses, but they feel warmer and the color lends itself to an old-fashioned style a bit better than chrome or stainless. Likewise, light fixtures that are vaguely industrial in looks, exposed beams, a lot of white paint, clawfoot tub, beadboard trim....etc.


  • PRO
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Based upon the farmhouses I have lived in, chrome plated brass faucets with 10-20% of the chrome worn off exposing the brass is the most authentic.

    Edit: Other than indoor plumbing there wasn't much modern about the farmhouses, but they had character that can not be duplicated.

  • 5 years ago

    Cook's Kitchen nailed it. That's pretty much what I was trying to say earlier but didn't put it nearly so well. "TV kitsch" is a great articulation of what it is you want to avoid in decorating this house. Take your time with the decor - it's better if you build up your look over time rather than put it together all a the once like you're rushing to stage it in time for the big reveal at the end of the episode.


    And I totally agree about chrome (or polished steel) fixtures. Can't go wrong. Real farmhouses aren't concerned with how "farmhouse" the faucets are as long as they work. Push the look too hard and you end up with that staged "TV kitsch" look instead. It's good to back it up and stay classic in areas like faucet hardware.

  • 5 years ago

    Well said, Penny. I wholeheartedly agree.

  • 5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    @kennady12

    Take a visit to the blog fortheloveofahouse.blogspot.com It chronicles the restoration of a real, honest to goodness farmhouse in New Hampshire. There's incredible detail provided. The style is not exactly modern farmhouse but I think may provide both you and your wife lots of inspiration and ideas. The house is the real deal, lovingly and meticulously renovated and restored.

  • 5 years ago

    Kennady, as far as 1x8 base boards go, our last house had 8" tall baseboards in every room regardless of size and it looked just fine. In our current house the base boards are 7" tall on both floors.Base board height is related primarily to room height and should be consistent throughout a home, or at least throughout each floor. With 9' ceilings or higher anything under 6" is not going to have enough visual weight to anchor the walls. 8" gives that extra bit of visual definition, especially if the walls are going to be white as well as the trim.

  • 5 years ago

    Also, the biggest thing to watch out for with a house that has several elements progressing at different rates while the roof has yet to be installed is that the air barriers, vapor barriers, and flashing (at windows, at eaves,) etc, are all being tied together properly. Those are the types of things that may not cause problems while your house is brand new, or at least not problems that you notice, but could continue to be issues down the road, or for the next owner.

  • 5 years ago

    I hate to be pedantic, but I disagree that we all know what is meant by Modern Farmhouse.

    These are the first four photos that came up when I used that search term and filtered to living rooms. They are all different. White is a commonality, but every detail is different from room to room. Where and how colour is used is different from room to room.


    Altadore Showhome by Trickle Creek Designer Homes · More Info

    Condo Renovation · More Info

    Ridgefield · More Info

    Modern Farm House · More Info

    My only point is that we can't have any way of knowing which version of Modern Farmhouse appeals to the OP or anyone else because we can't read their minds.

    This is different from so-called Tuscan, Mediterranean, Scandinavian, Southwestern styles which have a very distinct architectural form and interior detailing as well as specific furniture styles, and which rely on generally understood palettes to support the looks.

    And *none* of them have any bearing at all on what would be found "in typical farmhouses" because Typical Farmhouses are a myth. (Except in my experience, one doesn't find a lot of white in farmhouses...)

    Who am I kidding, I love to be pedantic lol.

  • 5 years ago
    Lindsey......doing a search for mid century modern is all over the place as well (especially on the interiors).
  • 5 years ago

    Well I would say that many professionals are attaching the term "modern farmhouse" in order to sell their services and/or products because it's what will get hits. If mcm were popular now and everyone was doing that, then I have no doubt that a lot of spaces would be labeled "urban mcm" or "warm mcm" or whatever the style du jour term is...regardless of what the spaces actually are. Just my thoughts, of course...


  • PRO
    5 years ago

    Yes...and that's the point (repeatedly made in thread after thread): "modern farmhouse" has no architectural meaning whatsoever. There's no simple, commonly understood definition at all.


    "Modern Farmhouse" is marketing jargon. It's made up to sell stuff to people. Just like "Shabby Chic" and "Color of the Month"...get on the bandwagon and buy a shabby chic modern farmhouse painted the color of the month...


    So many people fall for it after watching HGTV and like sources.



  • 5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I absolutely agree, mid century modern is an ambiguous term. So is transitional.

    If someone asks for MCM we know what they want. Low, sleek furniture with mid-tone exposed wood; glossy surfaces, maybe a little plastic-y; saturated colours.

    The difference with Farmhouse is that it is so specifically tied to an occupation and lifestyle.

    If someone asks for "the style that would typically be in a lawyer's house" how do you help from there?

    At first, I did understand the OP to mean Modern Farmhouse. And I agree, we have a broad idea of what that is but I do think it is very open to interpretation, more so than other styles. Then s/he clarified "...type of trim that [is] typically in farmhouses..." That's what I reacted to, because I took him or her at his or her word. And I thought it was important to note that no such thing as a "typical farmhouse" exists.

    It is academic though. I believe this family can and should have a home that they find beautiful no matter how it is labelled.

    It's my own problem that the label bothers me, and I know part of what bothers me is the idyllic stereotype that is perpetuated by "Modern Farmhouse." Is it made worse because agriculture is being continuously undermined and real farm families are losing their homes and farms everyday? Probably. That's also a personal problem that doesn't belong in this thread.

    Good luck @kennady, many blessings in your new home.

  • 5 years ago
    For everyone saying just google farmhouse or modern farmhouse and have at it . I’ve done that . My wife also has a Pinterest board . I tend to over research everything, I just came on here to see if there were some things I may have missed . Thank you all , for the links advice and ideas . I was just sitting here on break , reading through everything again . Everyone that decided to put rude and unhelpful comments. You must be hard to live with .
  • 5 years ago

    I agree with Pennydesign about other fixtures, lights, curtain rods etc.. I‘m not sure if chrome or steel would work with those, I was only referring to your question about bathroom and kitchen faucets. But never have been a fan of ORB faucets.

  • 5 years ago

    It's my own problem that the label bothers me, and I know part of what bothers me is the idyllic stereotype that is perpetuated by "Modern Farmhouse." Is it made worse because agriculture is being continuously undermined and real farm families are losing their homes and farms everyday? Probably. That's also a personal problem that doesn't belong in this thread.


    Totally picking up what you're laying down there!! :/

    I suppose our personal home is a "modern farmhouse", literally meaning, we live on a farm and it's not old.

    I think this is what pops in my head first when I hear this term. When I was younger I wanted to buy an old farm house and remodel it. My dad said "can we build you a new/old [modern] farmhouse" so we wouldn't have the issues with old homes & remodel. I love our home. But a piece of me wishes it was old. :)

    Is it decorated the way "modern farmhouse" decor pops in my head? No. Some of it is similar, yes. But we have tons of wood & color. White would not work in our world.


    Sorry about the random of topic... This thread & the other farmhouse one has me really thinking about all this!


  • PRO
    5 years ago

    Whenever any client asks me for a certain architectural style, I always ask, "What do you mean by that?"