snafu7x7

pantry food storage containers

Scott MacDonald
2 years ago

What do you guys like the most? I'm talking about long term storage of dried goods. like flour, sugar, oatmeal, etc. We have the pull out style pantry, like these . So something square shaped would be ideal so they would fit seamlessly next to one another.


Comments (62)

  • Kim Weaver
    2 years ago
    I like the glass canning jar idea but on my home they do not hold enough. I vote Tupperware modulars too!!!! (Excuse the labels. Time to print new ones)
  • wednesday morning
    2 years ago

    i have a large plastic jar that I keep white flour in. I don't even remember what it once held, but I think that it came full of something pickled. It has a wide mouth and holds a full five pound bag of flour. I have been using it for at least twenty years! I have not realized just how long I have been using this until this discussion came up. There are not many other things in my kitchen such as this that has lasted this long. And, it was meant as a one time use and throw away container. Had I put it into the landfill, it would still be there, in the landfill.

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  • Toronto Veterinarian
    2 years ago

    " I don't even remember what it once held, but I think that it came full of something pickled.........And, it was meant as a one time use and throw away container. Had I put it into the landfill, it would still be there, in the landfill. "

    Yes, but after 20 years of wear and wash, it is not safe as it once was with respect to cleanliness or chemicals. That's especially true for some plastics meant for single use. You should seriously think about replacing it (maybe with something glass, that will be safer to use for 20 years).

  • wednesday morning
    2 years ago

    I understand the point about the safety of plastic, but this does not get heated up and it does not hold any type of liquids. I think of all the years that I trusted and heated up things in a plastic container in the microwave!

    Actually, I have been thinking of replacing my flour jar, and that is what made me think of it.

    If these containers are unsafe after time, they are unsafe and unwise at any point.

    I actually avoid buying many things just because of the packaging. Yes, it does put some real limits on life style and consuming. But, on the other hand, I have learned to live quite well without so many of those things. Exercising that discretion really helps on my pathway of a more simple life. So many "needs" really are "needs" that are created by the consumer market to keep us coming back for more, and buying and consuming and hauling off to the landfills.

    Horrors!

    Many of the large containers at the likes of Costco are now also plastic, and not glass. I saw this happening some years ago and I saved some of the large glass containers that get used for various things. I figure that one day my grandkids will find my glass jar filled with Mardi Gras beads and doubloons, and the one filled with glass marbles. And, the one filled with semiprecious stones and polished rocks of all kinds.

    I love using my glass jars in the kitchen! Some foods look so inviting in the glass jars when I open my fridge. I see cut up fruit, chicken and noodles, pre cooked carrots, toasted grains, seeds, and nuts, etc. You can see exactly what it is. And, no more staining on plastic containers with tomato sauce or anything that has oil in it.

    One problem with a lot of glass containers is that they still have a plastic lid. Once that plastic lid gets worn or lost, it is no longer of value and gets tossed. The lids on a canning jar are reusable for all uses except for actual preserving/canning.

    They make great iced tea glasses, also.

  • Toronto Veterinarian
    2 years ago

    " If these containers are unsafe after time, they are unsafe and unwise at any point. "

    Huh? That's a really ridiculous argument.......Do you think that because something doesn't last forever in it's original state that it's useless? That because your car's breaks are unsafe after a certain amount of time and wear that they were never safe to begin with? Or that because safety shoes have to be replaced when the soles wear through means that they were never protective in the first place. As you said yourself - when the plastic lid of a jar gets worn, it has to be tossed....but that doesn't mean it was unwise or unsafe to use a plastic lid in the first place.



  • carladr
    2 years ago

    I've slowly eliminated all plastic food storage containers from our household. I use the square and rectangular Glasslock containers for leftovers and freezer batches of pasta, soup, etc. But for flour, sugar, etc. I use Anchor Hocking Montana canisters. They come in a variety of sizes and have a wide enough opening for a scoop. They are round, though.

  • townlakecakes
    2 years ago

    It depends how much you use. I have an old Charles Chips can for my sugar...it will hold 10#. I have cambros for self rising flour, bread flour and pastry flour, all of which I buy in 5# bags. I have rolling dog food bins for all purpose flour (25#) and rice (20#) Square is ideal for maximizing space. And the size of your containers should be based on the size of the packages you buy. You should be able to dump the whole bag of flour into the flour container. Thats why glass won’t work for me, either.


  • nidnay
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    I do exactly what wednesday morning does. I use canning jars and also have a vacuum sealer. They are incredibly inexpensive and they’re easy to clean, and don’t stain or get scratched like plastic does. I also have some plastic pop top containers that I use, but really love the canning jars for most everything. I have made salad in a jar as well....so pretty.

    I discovered a way to reuse the caning lids so they can be used over and over for machine vacuum sealing.......Punch a small hole in the top of the flat canning lid (you can use a small nail and a hammer to make the hole) and then cover the hole with a piece of electrical tape. Then seal in the usual way with your vacuum sealer. When you want to open the lid, you just peel back the tape to expose the hole to let the air escape. When you want to seal the jar again, just cover the hole back up with the tape and vacuum seal again.

    6 - Misc · More Info


  • wednesday morning
    2 years ago


    Toronto, I think you wrongly read my comment.


    If plastic containers are harmful to us at any stage, whether new or old, it is probably unwise to use them in the first place. You are right, it is probably "time to think about replacing it" (my flour container). It was quite decidedly a plastic that was" meant for single use".


    I was agreeing that "it is not safe as it once was" to use the old container!!


    I never said anything about plastic lids on jars. All of my jars have metal canning lids and rings and I am never in need of a lid because they are all the same lids. I never have to sort through a drawer of them to find the right one. It is like having a drawer full of all black socks the same size! All you have to do is reach for one.

    And, glass containers that have plastic lids ARE useless when the lid gets lost or broken. It does not mean that it was always useless.

    Who would think that,and, why?

    But, that pretty much renders it useless if the dog chewed up the lid or it warped in the microwave. Before that, it probably did a whiz/bang job of keeping the meatloaf from drying out.

    I won't buy glass containers that have plastic lids for that reason---they get lost, broken, warped or chewed up.

    Car brakes? Shoe soles? .....what?




  • Toronto Veterinarian
    2 years ago

    wednesday morning, your post is really incomprehensible to me, and it seems to me you're contradicting yourself several times. So, it's clear that your post is no more understandable to me than mine was to you, apparently.

    C'est la vie.



  • Scott MacDonald
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    The plastic myth is fast becoming the next 'gluten' hoax where it causes everything from cancer to autism. It's already gotten to the point that you now see manufacturers marketing to it; everyone has a 'BPA Free' label on their products now even if they never contained BPA to begin with! Seriously people, instead of taking your cue from Dr Oz or some spam chain mail your idiot sister forwarded you, why not read some actual research from a reputable institution? They've done multiple studies if you could be bothered to even skim them.


    The reality is that the plastic used for food storage is inert at room temperature. It doesn't 'break down' over time, it doesn't 'leech toxins' into your food, that's utter nonsense and not supported by basic chemistry. Now if you heat it, that's a different story, especially if the plastic is not designed for microwave use and sadly that's what a lot of these pseudo studies that make their way onto daytime TV are conducted, they take cheap dollar store plastic containers not intended to be microwaved and heat them for long periods of time and then lo and behold they start to break down! Shocker!


    Be smart with it and you have nothing to worry about. Buy quality plastic containers, spend a little extra to get something well made and not made in China out of god knows what (i.e. dont buy them at Walmart). Use them for storing dry goods long term or for leftovers in the fridge or taking lunch to work etc. And to be extra safe, put your food on a glass or ceramic plate to microwave it.




  • Toronto Veterinarian
    2 years ago

    " The reality is that the plastic used for food storage is inert at room temperature. It doesn't 'break down' over time, it doesn't 'leech toxins' into your food, that's utter nonsense and not supported by basic chemistry. "

    Right, but over time and with use, it does develop micro-scratches that can harbour bacteria and are virtually impossible to keep clean. That's basic physics (and microbiology). Plastic can probably be used decades for just storage, but once it's used and washed repeatedly, it does have a limited (though years-long) life.

  • Mrs Pete
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    I like the glass canning jar idea but on my home they do not hold enough.

    Some of my canning jars are 1/2 gallon.

    I've slowly eliminated all plastic food storage containers from our household.

    Me too. As I said, I lean towards glass jars of various descriptions for the pantry, and I've bought a bunch of vintage Pyrex refrigerator boxes for leftovers -- I have them in two sizes, but my favorites are the small 1-cup size, which are perfect for making up 1-serving leftovers. They can go straight to the microwave, and then we require no extra dishes for lunch.

    The reality is that the plastic used for food storage is inert at room temperature ... Now if you heat it, that's a different story ...

    I hear what you're saying about theory, but in realistic use, plastic has some big pitfalls:

    - People do end up using plastic storage items that were never meant for food storage.

    - I might know which plastic items are microwave-safe, but I promise you my husband and children aren't going to pay any attention to that detail.

    - Over years, even the most attentive consumer may forget whether that rarely-used plastic dish was microwave safe or not.

    Why not just go with what's safe overall? Glass. It lasts longer, doesn't stain, and I find it a more pleasant item.

  • Scott MacDonald
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    it does develop micro-scratches that can harbour bacteria and are virtually impossible to keep clean.


    Hahaha, micro-scratches huh? lmao. You literally just made that up didn't you? I mean what would you have to be storing in your containers? Tacks? Broken glass? Razor blades? Most people store flour or sugar or the like, I don't think 'micro' scratches (or any other for that matter) are of any concern.



    - People do end up using plastic storage items that were never meant for food storage.


    - I might know which plastic items are microwave-safe, but I promise you my husband and children aren't going to pay any attention to that detail.


    - Over years, even the most attentive consumer may forget whether that rarely-used plastic dish was microwave safe or not.


    All your supposed pitfalls of plastic are solely due to 'user error'. If you don't put oil in you car and the engine seizes up do you blame the car? It's not a flaw inherent with the material, it's a flaw in how you're using it. I bet you're one of those people who loves to talk smack about how non-stick cookware flakes off and peels but ignores the the fact that you can't use metal spatulas or utensils with it or put it in the dishwasher.

  • nidnay
    2 years ago
    Here’s something from Harvard Medical School just in case anyone would like to educate themselves..... https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/microwaving-food-in-plastic-dangerous-or-not
  • PRO
    Anglophilia
    2 years ago

    I don't want glass containers in my kitchen as they are far too easy to drop and break. I broke a drinking glass last week: I'm still finding the occasional piece of it and believe me, I thoroughly vacuumed that kitchen and also used a broom and a Swifter floor duster. I have pets and don't want glass in paws.

    I love those Oxo containers with the push tops. They are easy to store, easy to handle and they keep flours/grains etc free of pests.

    Yes, all those glass jars look very pretty. I used to use some very old ones that had a blue tent. But they're dangerous where breakage is concerned, and a bother to open and close. My Oxo are INSIDE my cabinets - not part of my kitchen decor. For canisters, I prefer stainless steel with glass tops. Found mine at Target about 15 years ago and they work like a charm!

  • Mrs Pete
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    All your supposed pitfalls of plastic are solely due to 'user error'.

    Yes, user error causes most problems with most things!

    I bet you're one of those people who loves to talk smack about how non-stick cookware flakes off and peels but ignores the the fact that you can't use metal spatulas or utensils with it or put it in the dishwasher.

    Actually, all my frying pans are stainless steel -- Cuisinart Multi-clad Pro, to be exact -- but thanks for the personal attack in the midst of an otherwise decent discussion. Clearly you feel very strongly about plastic.

    I don't want glass containers in my kitchen as they are far too easy to drop and break. I broke a drinking glass last week: I'm still finding the occasional piece of it and believe me, I thoroughly vacuumed that kitchen and also used a broom and a Swifter floor duster. I have pets and don't want glass in paws.

    That is a downfall of glass, but canning jars are pretty tough to break. Other glassware, maybe not so much.

  • oldbat2be
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    Nidnay - the picture you posted is lovely, but... I like knowing expiration dates and am not sure how these are managed with glass. Similarly, I question some of the glass spice storage containers one sees on the forum. I buy most of my spices from Penzeys and mark the label with the month/year purchased.

    Regarding plastic... I've learned not to call this my tupperware drawer, but it's incredibly functional. Glass is not as stackable - or said differently, is thicker so less can be stored in the same space. I use these for leftovers and salads and rarely (I think) microwave them.



    Another thing I worry about with glass is exposure to light. I keep flour and sugar in solid canisters on the counter, and everything else in the dry goods storage pantry, stocked as the items are sold. Beans unfortunately are at a lower shelf which the cat occasionally attacks so I get the glass argument there....


    Left lower side of dry goods pantry:



  • nidnay
    2 years ago
    Oldbat.....well i guess we all do what works best for us in our individual situations. For my household, we go through things pretty fast and there are some foods that just don’t really go bad (dried beans for instance....they last basically indefinitely....they may take a bit longer to cook if they’re older, but they don’t go “bad”). And you can always use marker on the bottom of glass jars and write dates which can be easily washed off for your next items.
  • townlakecakes
    2 years ago

    Oldbat, is it your pantry I’m remembering with double doors? if so are they pocket doors or bypass?

  • Toronto Veterinarian
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    " Yes, it confirmed a gluten intolerance, Celiac. "

    That's not a gluten intolerance, really.....it's like a gluten allergy (but it's an autoimmune disease, not a true allergy). I agree, it's very serious. Unfortunately a lot of people think or like to pretend they have a gluten intolerance when they really don't, and it really is a hoax for most people......It's the few with Celiac disease who really do have to take such caution with their food.

  • Scott MacDonald
    Original Author
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    >Gluten free is not a myth. My daughter who is now 42 was diagnosed at age 2 with Celiac

    It is when you make no distinction between the two, if you really have a daughter with celiac disease you would think you'd know better by now since you would have experienced it firsthand.

    1. Celiac Disease - legitimate, serious medical conditon that affects about 0.75% of the population
    2. Gluten "Intolerance" - probably a very small percentage actually have this...maybe they got half the genes for celiac or something so they get partial symptoms, but 99% of people claiming this are utterly full of it These are basically imbeciles who are easily manipulated by advertising and pseudo science. They're also the type of people always looking for a silver bullet to explain why they feel lethargic, tired, cranky, whatever. Thea reality is they eat crap, they're overweight and they don't exercise, it has nothing in the slightest to do with gluten. Walk thru a grocery store sometime and review all the products that have 'gluten free!' labels on them...products made from corn, rice, potatoes, beans...they never had gluten to begin with, you're an idiot if you buy into that nonsense.
  • oldbat2be
    2 years ago

    townlake - Pocket doors, which are almost always open, solving yet another problem.




  • Mrs Pete
    2 years ago

    Glass is not as stackable - or said differently, is thicker so less can be stored in the same space.


    Here's my cabinet with my vintage Pyrex refrigerator boxes nested together -- they are my go-to leftover storage. Medium-sized lids and dishes on the left, individual-sized dishes and lids on the right. Yes, it's a little more space than plastic, but not a whole lot more.



    You can't tell from this picture, but I have these boxes in two sizes (I don't collect the largest size). I love having individual-sized leftovers in the refrigerator -- they go right into the microwave for lunches. I love these little dishes, and in the 5-6 years I've been collecting them, I've never broken one -- they definitely have a longer lifespan than a plastic tub.



    Another thing I worry about with glass is exposure to light. I keep flour and sugar in solid canisters on the counter, and everything else in the dry goods storage pantry, stocked as the items are sold.


    Yes, that's a downside to glass -- light is an enemy to stored food. All of my glass-stored foods are in the pantry, where it's dark. Like you, I definitely prefer a solid canister on the counter, where it'll be seen everyday.


    And you can always use marker on the bottom of glass jars and write dates which can be easily washed off for your next items


    That's exactly what I do with things in the pantry!

  • nidnay
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    Mrs Pete....I have some of the old Corning Ware. I love these things. Has a nice handle and glass cover with knob. I invert the covers and they stack nicely that way. Now.....I wouldn’t be storing flour or sugar in them, but they’re great for storing leftovers and reheating etc (and of course they are oven and freezer safe)......and they’re 43 years old!

  • Scott MacDonald
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    @marrymaid less than 1% of the population has legit celiac disease, MAYBE another 2-3% have some mild sensitivity to it...the rest are either hypochondriacs who think they have everything or the fall into that group of dull-witted, easily led suckers who also think crystals have healing power and that your body needs to be 'cleansed of toxins' by eating/drinking some disgusting hippie concoction. Just because dumb people believe things doesn't make them true, not even close

  • Toronto Veterinarian
    2 years ago

    " TV, many can still be sensitive to gluten without Celiac and they know how their body responds, so not necessarily “pretending “. "

    No, I think A FEW, not "many". About 1% of the population has celiac disease, and maybe another 1%-2% have other gluten related issues. That's hardly "many". Yes, there are people who react poorly to gluten, but don't have celiac disease, but it's still a huge minority - like <1% of people who are allergic to wheat (so can't eat wheat gluten, but can have other glutinous grains like barley). Those few people, those 2%-3%, should avoid gluten - no question - but I'm not going to say that it's "many" people. It's a drop in the bucket compared to those with lactose intolerance, for instance.

    I honestly believe that the vast majority of people who say that they have a gluten intolerance do not -- they may feel better on the healthier diet that they are eating as a way to avoid gluten, but the lack of gluten is not why they feel better. It's just a trendy rack to hang their dietary choices on.

  • wilson853
    2 years ago

    snafu mcsnurf, you asked a simple question that many were kind enough to respond to. I honestly don't see why you dived off into the 'gluten hoax' or have the need to call people 'hypochondriacs', and 'dull witted easily led suckers' or 'dumb'. I am deleting my help above.

  • Jo
    2 years ago
    I also have the Oxo containers that Joy has. I am very happy with them.
  • ericakn
    2 years ago

    They sell plastic tops for mason jars. I switched over to mason jars from zip lock containers years ago. This way the food is heated and stored in glass.


    Off topic but I have hypothyroidism. My synthoid dose was cut in half once I stopped eating gluten and I stopped wanting to nap at 3 pm and drink 3 cups of coffee. I like controlling the disease as much as I can with diet instead of drugs. Huge bonus is that I feel sooooo much better.

  • Toronto Veterinarian
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    " What difference does it make to you how people feel regarding their health and their food choices? "

    I don't care what people eat, and I hope they eat what makes them feel good. What matters to me is the propagation of the use of real medical conditions in false circumstances......When real medical terms are hijacked by those who use them inappropriately (or flat out wrongly), it waters down the meaning of the terms and does a disservice to those to whom the terms actually apply. And that has an effect on people's (and more importantly health care providers') understanding and ability to deal with the issue.

    Is it a real allergy, where a mistake could mean a 911 call and possibly death, or is it someone who likes to think they have an allergy so people won't ask them to eat [whatever] and they get some special attention and maybe even a bit of an ego boost from that? That's why it makes a difference to me.

  • marrymaid
    2 years ago
    Wilson, I agree and will delete.
  • Scott MacDonald
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Toronto has it exactly right. You can 100% eat whatever nonsense you want for whatever reasons you want. It matters not in the slightest to me...but it doesn't follow from that that I have to believe your lies and make believe nonsense. Where I do take issue however, is with people who are so far gone that they actually believe their own BS and they start spreading that misinformation and it grows into an epidemic of stupidity. That's exactly what happened with the gluten craze and it has numerous negative side effects, key among them it detracts from the people who ACTUALLY have a real disease and need to avoid it, it messes with legitimate research too when you have thousands of fakers skewing the results. It also harms the small businesses like bakeries and pastry shops when you have all these frauds telling everyone your product is poison. Humans have been eating gluten for centuries with zero issues (aside from those with actual celiac disease), it didnt suddenly become an epidemic that affects 20% or more of the population, that's absolutely obtuse.


    Wilson, hahahahah, nice try, but I already made my purchases last week...too little too late, hahahahaha

  • marrymaid
    2 years ago
    So sad.
  • wilson853
    2 years ago

    Yes, very sad. The OP is more concerned about being a right-fighter, than actually thanking any of the above responders (close to 20 people) that went to the trouble to answer the original question with thoughtful responses and photos. Again, very sad. Ciao!

  • Mrs Pete
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    I have some of the old Corning Ware. I love these things. Has a nice handle and glass cover with knob. I invert the covers and they stack nicely that way. Now.....I wouldn’t be storing flour or sugar in them, but they’re great for storing leftovers and reheating etc (and of course they are oven and freezer safe)......and they’re 43 years old!

    I don't collect those particular pieces, but as I look at them ... I think my husband would like individual-sized leftovers stored in those. He prefers the stovetop over the microwave. Oh no ... DON'T get me started collecting anything else in the kitchen. I'm already something of a kitchen hoarder (without the garbage and filth).

    No, not good for storing flour or sugar -- but no one piece is good for every type of cooking or every storage need.

    less than 1% of the population has legit celiac disease, MAYBE another 2-3% have some mild sensitivity to it...the rest are either hypochondriacs who think they have everything or the fall into that group of dull-witted, easily led suckers who also think crystals have healing power and that your body needs to be 'cleansed of toxins' by eating/drinking some disgusting hippie concoction. Just because dumb
    people believe things doesn't make them true, not even close

    Hmmm, I'm not well informed on this topic, so I did some poking around:

    - If you trust the internet, 1% of otherwise healthy adults have Celiac Disease -- but that doesn't include people who have related conditions and ALSO have gluten-sensitivity. So the actual number is greater than 1%, though my interest waned before I discovered a more realistic number.

    - Thinking about good diets ... gluten only exists in carbohydrates, and most of us tend to over-eat carbohydrates. So cutting back on gluten could absolutely equate to improving your diet ... and we could all use that.

    - Two of my family members (who are not blood related to one another) are sensitive to gluten, and both have vastly improved their health by cutting back on gluten.

    - Regardless, it's not nice to call people dumb.

  • Scott MacDonald
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    Hmmm, I'm not well informed on this topic,


    that's the understatement of the year


    Thinking about good diets ... gluten only exists in carbohydrates, and most of us tend to over-eat carbohydrates. So cutting back on gluten could absolutely equate to improving your diet ... and we could all use that.


    It might not be nice, but if the shoe fits? gluten has nothing to do with carbs, there are dozens of sources of carbs (corn, rice, all legumes, fruits, nuts, the list goes on and on). Gluten is a protein found in wheat (and a couple other less common grains...like i think rye has it too?), that's it, it has nothing to do with carbs, you are once again talking nonsense, congrats

  • Toronto Veterinarian
    2 years ago

    " So cutting back on gluten could absolutely equate to improving your diet ... and we could all use that. "

    I does improve the diet of many, and so they do feel better, but removing gluten isn't the cause - the overall improvement of the diet is the cause. It is very possible for a gluten free diet to be high in carbs, fat, and sugar and not make someone feel better.


    " A relatively uniform prevalence has been found in many countries, ranging between 1 in 67 and 1 in 250 with an approximate average of 1% in well-designed studies from diverse areas including North and South America, eastern and western Europe, Turkey, the Middle East, and North Africa. "

  • Toronto Veterinarian
    2 years ago

    " Gluten is a protein found in wheat (and a couple other less common grains...like i think rye has it too?), "

    Primarily wheat, barley, and rye, but also malt, brewer's yeast, and triticale. And of course derivatives of wheat, like spelt and kamut.

  • Buehl
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    The gluten protein that those of us with Celiac Disease (yes, an autoimmune disease) react to is found in wheat, rye, and barley and includes not just those grains as-is but also items derived from them (e.g., barley malt). Oats are often included as well b/c of the very high possibility of cross-contamination of oats due to shared harvesters, transportation, processing, etc., with wheat, barley, and rye. Some also cannot tolerate oats even when they are truly "certified gluten-free" oats (i.e., all equipment & facilities are dedicated gluten-free).

    Gluten-intolerance has also been established as a valid non-Celiac condition. While it's true that many who think they are gluten-sensitive my really have a wheat allergy or be sensitive to other ingredients that are commonly found in products made from wheat/barley/rye, that does not mean it's a "hoax" -- people are reacting to something.

  • ericakn
    2 years ago

    It may be the way our food is processed, grown, crops treated with as well. I haven’t done research into that and don’t care to. I ate gluten overseas and my stomach wasn’t a mess, not tired, no weight gain. Got back to the states and figured I already broke my gluten free, I am going to enjoy bread for a few weeks. Back to feeling like crap within 2 days. Cut it back out. I can eat corn but corn tortillas and chips are a no go. Rice and oats are fine in moderation.


    My husband felt the same way a lot of you did when I first talked about cutting it out but now when I am tempted he will laugh and say ”we will both be punished if you do that.”. Not worth it.



  • Toronto Veterinarian
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    " I ate gluten overseas and my stomach wasn’t a mess, not tired, no weight gain. Got back to the states and figured I already broke my gluten free, I am going to enjoy bread for a few weeks. Back to feeling like crap within 2 days. "

    How interesting! More thoughts about what might be going on........hmmm......

  • Mrs Pete
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    Gluten is a protein found in wheat (and a couple other less common grains...like i think rye has it too?), that's it, it has nothing to do with carbs, you are once again talking nonsense, congrats

    Wheat (and the other couple grains that contain gluten) are in carbohydrates. Like breads and pastas. Can you name a gluten-containing food that isn't a carbohydrate? No, not all carbohydrates contain gluten, but gluten only exists in carbohydrates. The overlap between the two is significant.

    You do realize that being nasty doesn't make you right, don't you?

    I does improve the diet of many, and so they do feel better, but removing gluten isn't the cause - the overall improvement of the diet is the cause.

    That was my point. You're saying I'm talking nonsense, then reiterating my theme.

  • beachem
    2 years ago

    @oldbat you keep making me break the 10 commandments. I’ve already lusted after your pantry since your reveal and now I’m envying your storage drawer. So neat!!!

    I’m a neat freak who lives with messes and over hoarding. Sigh.

    Anyway for the OP, I use these containers below.

    That’s my baking drawer. Labels are temporary.

    I’ve used the OXO and hate them. Cleaning the lids are impossible. I use the Loc-Tite ones.

    For other containers, I reuse/repurpose all glass containers.

    Here’s my liquid gold (broth) in hubby’s whiskey bottles.

    As to gluten issue, I despise the mention of the issue since my sister is part of the population that claims gluten intolerance and now has up her claim to celiac disease. Mind you, she drinks beer by the pitcher and eat bread whenever she wants but the claims give her sympathy with my other siblings who have no clue about it.

    My DH’s best friend has celiac and we go through hoops whenever he dines over. I studied up on all the restrictions 16 yrs ago when I started dating hubby so I wouldn’t poison his friend by accident.

    Being educated on celiac and gluten intolerance made me frustrated with people who make false claims. It’s hilarious to me that markets are now label fruits etc as gluten free.

  • oldbat2be
    2 years ago

    Thanks Beachem! I'm impressed at how many flours you keep. Not sure what to say about your sister - except, I'm sure your kitchen is far more lovely and functional than hers! Would love to hear more about your liquid gold recipes. (Boy, that one in the Monkey Shoulder bottle is dark!)

    Mrs. Pete - I enjoyed the pictures of your Corningware and I would prefer to be using glass than plastic. I take your point about it not taking up a lot more space. Maybe after I figure out what I want to do with the mudroom, kids' bathroom, and our bedroom, I'll revisit the 'tupperware' drawer.

  • wednesday morning
    2 years ago

    i have to agree that some of the personal attacks and screaming in some of these posts on this thread has been uncalled for. Opinions can be strong, and they can provoke some strong responses. But, personal attacks are unacceptable.

    Sometimes it is difficult to draw a straight line between a strongly worded opinion and personal attack when the opinion is seen as denunciation, but there should be some attempt to make that delineation. People who post here are inviting opinions and advice from strangers on the world wide web.. There will be misstatements and misinterpretations,differing versions of the truth, and, sometimes there will be too much said, too strongly. There will almost always be someone who feels that their toes have been stomped on, no matter what. That is unavoidable.

    But, there are no spitballs or flaming arrows allowed!

    Get a grip! All this was to be about was kitchen storage containers!!

    Glass, or plastic?


    By the way, I too have some of those old fashioned covered dishes such as pyrex. I have a darling nested set of very pretty colors and nice looking glass lids. I treasure them and really enjoy using them! They were given to me from the kitchen of an elderly lady who's family cared not for them.

    Enough said here about this--- moving on. I feel quite certain that someone is awaiting my opinion of how to place their sofa. I am sure I can muster an opinion for them and let them know exactly what I think they are doing all wrong. (insert muffled laughter here)

  • Scott MacDonald
    Original Author
    2 years ago

    @ wednesday morning There's no personal attacks here, all you're getting is stiff opposition to people posting blatantly false pseudo science as if it were fact. We have quite enough ignorance and misinformation on the internet these days, it serves no good purpose to allow more of it

  • beachem
    2 years ago

    @oldbat. It's the same broth, beef bone. There's no lighting in the back of the fridge so it looks darker. My vegetable soups are in repurposed marinara sauce jars in the drawer below.

    Frankly, even though it's just the two of us now, we're running out of room in our huge freezer due to all the food prep. I have stock (beef, chicken, veal), soups (4-5 kinds along with my standard leek and vegetable puree), multiple keto friendly desserts (brownies, flourless chocolate cakes, cheesecakes, etc.) and frozen lunches. I'm going back to feeding him our normal 3-4 course meals for dinner. So far, he's lost 10 lbs in 5 weeks with lots of indulgences so he's happy.

  • Anne Duke
    2 years ago
    I vote for glass canning jars too. Use a label maker for ID. I have purchased several OXO pop ups all in one size that are versatile and neat looking. Squares and rectangular shapes are more efficient than round containers. Get a canning funnel to make filling easier and neater.
  • AvatarWalt
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    I missed this dual-purpose thread the first time around and it's been an interesting read. Personally, I can't fathom why people don't rely on evidence-based information, and the gluten-free proliferation is an eye-roller, right up there with failing to vaccinate, fear of fluoridated water, and other such nonsense. Now, as for storage containers, I wanted something as square as possible and eventually landed on Progressive Prokeeper containers. I wish they were less rounded and tapered, but their contents-specific containers are very handy: the flour container has a bar for sweeping off the measuring cup, the brown sugar container has a clay disk to soak in water that keeps the sugar soft, the sugar container has a little spout making it easy to pour out, and the powdered sugar container has a little sprinkler thingy. There may be others too, but that's my full collection.