Food to prepare for daughter's friends.

Juju Kloss

My daughter is finally moving back home after 4 years in the university and I couldn’t be more excited. She’s flying back in two weeks with a couple of Colombian women friends, said they wanted to see more of Louisiana. As a good gesture, I wanted to prepare a backyard party for my girl and her friends. Of course I’ll have the usual jambalaya and gumbo and my wife’s preparing some arroz con pollo, plantains, and flan for dessert too.


My daughter grew up eating traditional Louisiana and Cuban dishes, my wife being Cuban and all. But aside from those things, I also want to prepare some Colombian food for our guests.They’ve been away from home just about the same time as my daughter so I bet they miss eating homemade food. Any suggestions?

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Martha Scott

That's a great idea. I've not idea but it's really thoughtful of you to prepare some of their native dishes. A quick google should give you some ideas I would think.

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

Let's turn this into a Hot Topics discussion, HaHa!

I have the opposite opinion. Unless you are well known for making great food in other people's native dishes, or asked to do so, you are taking chances.

A couple of Japanese professional friends visiting the USA told me this. They were invited to someone's dinner. and the host made Japanese food, served the food with background Japanese music. My friends were offended.

Your daughter's Colombian women friends, said they wanted to see more of Louisiana, and taste more local food.

dcarch

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rob333 (zone 7a)

I have to agree with dcarch. There's a group I work with who are from all over the world and who travel internationally. They went to Japan and were disappointed to be served cheeseburgers (less than stellar, at that) when all they wanted was a "true experience". When they came to Nashville all they wanted to do was go honky-tonking. Even though I'm not into that AT ALL (or find that any Nashvillean is! My son and I play spot the tourist game. You have to point out the cowboy hat/boot wearing soul who looks lost as a ball in high weeds), but that's what they wanted. They got a meat and three meal+the Wildhorse Saloon. Ew. But they loved it. Your guests would love to do a crawfish boil, so too bad it's past in season. Or to savor a King cake. That said, your gumbo and jambalaya are gonna be a hit!

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plllog

I agree. If you want to have something that's less challenging to someone who has never tasted anything like it, especially if it's spicy, still keep it local or universal. Maybe something like fried or barbecue chicken, grilled fish, shrimp skewers, green salad, or grilled corn.

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wintercat_gw

Offended? Because someone tried to please them and took the trouble of preparing their native food? I'd be touched and pleased by such a hospitable, kind and thoughful gesture.

Juju Kloss, I'm attaching what appears to be a link to some good Colombian recipes. Go for it! Good luck. I think it's a great idea.

https://www.mycolombianrecipes.com/top-12-colombian-foods-and-dishes-you-must-try

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foodonastump

Are the Colombian friends visiting as a stopover to home? Or will they still not be going home any time soon?

If they’re headed home, I say let them wait for their homecoming to enjoy their traditional meals. You say they’re “flying in” so they’ve not likely overloaded on LA food - I’d stick with that and Cuban.

If it’s going to be a while before they’re back home, then attempting some Colombian dishes sounds very thoughtful to me.

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sooz

You can always ask what they might prefer...or offer them some options and get some specific input that way.

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Anglophilia

They will want to sample your local cuisine, not their own. Stick to what your daughter grew up eating - she's probably been regaling her friends about what she has missed so much!

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

"wintercat_gw

Offended? Because someone tried to please them and took the trouble of preparing their native food? ------"

Another Korean friend told me she was invited to a dinner, and the hostess wore Korean tradition Hanbok dress for the dinner. She was offended. She felt she was being stereotyped and racially profiled.

dcarch


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foodonastump

Ha just realized something. Remember this one?

https://www.gardenweb.com/discussions/5391631/got-a-catering-gig-cooking-for-a-colombian-family#n=10

Well “Aiden Smith” never came back to the thread. Google the subject line and it was posted in like a half dozen different forums.

Google this subject line about Colombian food and guess what...

Wonder if we’ll see “Juju” again.

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lindac92

Good sleuthing....I am still amazed by someone who used to post here who was really 2 people.....and we were a loooong time discovering that alter-ego.

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plllog

FOAS, I was thinking about that when this thread was first posted (that, and some spam going around about "Colombian women", but I thought it worth giving the benefit of the doubt). It's actually a good question. Perhaps "offended" is too strong a word for the food (as opposed to the guests' national dress...), but I sure wouldn't want to go to a party in a foreign country and be served first time seeing the recipe fried chicken or pot roast (both easy dishes that can go terribly wrong). Whereas I think some general, plain dishes that anyone could like, to augment the more challenging signature dishes that are local specialties, made the best way the cook knows, is good hospitality.

OTOH, you've reminded me that after living a couple of months with a host family when I was in Mexico, I went with a friend to a restaurant that had an Old West American cowboy theme. The meat looked Mexican, in the way it was butchered, but it tasted like campfire barbecue and was a very welcome taste of home.

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foodonastump

(LindaC, in retrospect there were a lot of weird things going on here back in the day. Some probably best forgotten!)

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wintercat_gw

dcarch, cooking your guest's native food may be interpreted in various and opposing ways. One guest will consider it gracious and hospitable, whereas another will feel stereotyped and racially profiled. In many cases such reactions reflect on the guest rather than the host. Keeping an open mind and trying to see what is happening without coloring it all with your own emotions is so difficult that what most people do is identify what they expect to happen rather than see what is happening. Even when one's own version of reality is unpleasant, it becomes with time a comfort zone in the sense that it's predictable and familiar, and one is reluctant to deviate from it.

Of course racism exists in a very real way. I've had personal experience of it and I loathe it. I bump into it too often, but I doubt the judgement of a person accusing her hosts with racism on the sole evidence that those hosts tried to give her a taste of her own home when she was away from it. In all likelihood they did it because that's what they would have liked for themselves if they were away from home for a while.

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laceyvail 6A, WV

If I were visiting a foreign country and were invited to a home for a meal, I would want, hope for and expect the food of that country. How disappointed I'd be if someone attempted to make me "American" food! Many cooking magazines are full of articles about traveling to a new place and the joy of being invited to a real home for the home cooking of that country.

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Susan Tencza

For the big backyard event, stick to local foods - as mentioned this is likely something your daughter has been talking to them about and they may be looking forward to trying. If they are staying over for a bit, you could ask them to share what their favorite foods are and "share" by cooking together those foods for your family to experience. But, whichever way you choose to do this event, I am positive since they are friends of your daughter that they will love being there.




























































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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

Wintercat:

"--------- In many cases such reactions reflect on the guest rather than the host.-----"

I was invited to a private company golf outing. Dinner was served at the end of the day. The golf outing was to honor the president of the company, who happened to be black.

After a few guests went to the podium to give speeches about what a great guy the president was. It was the president's turn to give thanks and acceptance speech, " Thank you, thank you, thank you! Before I start, I want to ask you guys to save me some watermelon on the buffet table. You know how much we like watermelons ------"

That totally crack everyone up. A few tables had to be cleaned up because a few guests sprayed wine all over.

Yes, it depends.

dcarch

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CindyMac


And Aiden and Juju each have only one post.


The thing I immediately found suspicious was "backyard party" in Louisiana in August.

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bragu_DSM 5

BBQ!

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colleenoz

And now Adonis Stewart over on the Recipe Exchange wants to make Colombian food for a family reunion of people from all over the world.

Yet another Colombian food post

Will we start seeing posts advertising a new Colombian food cookbook soon?

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foodonastump

Yep.


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l pinkmountain

Cue Twilight Zone music. The dark web. I predict Colombian food to be the next food craze! I actually had a friend once from Colombia. He was a coffee snob! He would only drink his own coffee, prepared the Colombian way, which is kind of like our pressed coffee except he didn't press it, just drank the top half of the cup and left the grounds at the bottom.

If I wanted to fix something "Colombian" for my guests, I would do mocha flourless cake. That way I could not possibly go wrong! Well, I dunno everyone I know these days is trying to watch their weight or manage some inflammatory condition . . .

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artemis_ma

I have not read all the posts, but where you are... I'd do at least something Cajun.

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sonni1

hmmm... a couple of years ago, I thought it would be nice to make something Columbian for the family Christmas dinner for my niece's fiance (who is from Columbia. I made a bread/donut type pastry from a recipe I found online. Now I'm thinking it wasnt a good idea?

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