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New construction, W&D in garage, adding laundry sink next to...

Never Mind
3 years ago
last modified: 3 years ago

Hello,

We are in the planning stages of building a new house. We opted to move our W&D from the mudroom out into the attached / adjoining garage (our personal reasons). We asked for a rough in for a laundry room sink. The sink will be next to the washer & dryer and hot water heater.


What can we expect for a price on that (because I almost choked at what was quoted - considering we had a bar sink installed last year in our existing 18 year old house on the opposite side of our kitchen that cost only a fraction of what we were quoted)?


I need access to a large sink but more specifically hot water until our barn is built next year (we have horses). Once the barn is built we probably won't have a huge need (at least not a twice daily need) for the garage laundry sink, since we actually removed the laundry sink in the home we are currently living in (and moved it out to the barn, lol). Anyone have any other ideas?

Comments (45)

  • Jake The Wonderdog
    3 years ago

    So this is a really confusing. I can't tell what's going where, when, etc.

    Nobody can give you a $ estimate but your contractors(s). That said, a utility sink next to the laundry where the supply and drains already exist should be a low cost item.

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    If a home design cannot incorporate your needs during the design process, you’re working with a darn bad architect. Or some hack builder’s one semester of computer software drafter.

    If you’ve already signed a contract with the hack, he can charge you whatever he darn well pleases for change orders. That’s where he makes his money.

    Read your contract. And how to get out of it.

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  • PRO
    Mark Bischak, Architect
    3 years ago

    With your unique needs, you need someone more talented that the person that designed your house to work out a solution. Being located on a farm, I think I understand the want to have the washer & dryer in the garage. Without knowing more information it is difficult to come up with viable solutions.

    The reality of costs is that no matter what other people give you for estimated costs in this thread, you will be paying the person you choose to do the work what they charge you.

  • PRO
    Virgil Carter Fine Art
    3 years ago

    This isn't making good sense.

    If you are still in the "planning" stage, as you say, there's not much difference in whether or not there's a laundry sink next to your washer, dryer and WH in the garage.

    Have you asked your builder why the unexpected cost?

  • Alison
    3 years ago
    When we were in planning stages there wasn’t a lot of cost differences discussed as everything is connected. We planned the house we wanted and then the builder took the plans and our interior choices and priced it all out.
  • Never Mind
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    I'm not sure a laundry / utility sink in a garage is a 'unique need'. But ok.

    I'll try to break it down so it is less confusing -

    - New construction, still in planning phase (have not started building). This house is not a 'custom designed' house, it is from their inventory of plans they build.

    - The garage is attached to the house, walk into the interior of the house to the mud room where the house plans had the W&D.

    -The hot water heater was already in the garage per the stock version of the house plans.

    - We want the washer and dryer in the garage, on the same wall as the water heater. There was an additional cost / expense / charge to move the washer / dryer from the mud room to the garage to stud the exterior wall to 2 X 6 for insulation. I found that charge / expense acceptable for what was being done.

    - We want a rough in for a laundry room sink in the garage on the same wall as the washer / hot water heater (as in, not an actual sink or install of a sink, just the plumbing).

    When I emailed the builder to inquire about having a laundry sink roughed in on the same wall in the garage the sales person at their office replied with a quote of $600. This has nothing to do with installing what is needed for the washer. That does not include an actual sink or the install of the actual sink. I replied and asked the woman who is doing our pricing / paperwork (etc) if this was a type error. She replied "No".

    I was asking if there is something I'm missing that costs that much to plumb for the future install of a laundry-utility sink next to a washing machine in new construction.

    Recently in my current house, that is 18 years old, we had a bar sink installed on the opposite side of our kitchen, and the installer charged us about half that for labor and materials excluding the actual sink. And he had to crawl under the house, cut into the wall, etc.. This is why I was mildly shocked at the $600 quote since, in my non-professional thoughts, there is already a washing machine on the same wall (water in / water out already going on?!).

    I also didn't expect it to be that high because in 2 previous meetings the supervisor at the office was helping us plan out a walk-out basement that was only going to be partially finished (as in only 1/3 of the sq ft). I asked him specifically if placement mattered for the cost of a half-bath in the basement and his reply was "No, maybe back when copper pipes were used, but no, placement really doesn't affect the cost". I don't remember the cost of the half bath because we decided to finish out the entire basement but I don't remember gasping either.

    Also we had an additional hose bib added to the front exterior of the house for $185, in my thoughts not near any other water using rooms.

  • Alison
    3 years ago

    It sounds like you are not building a custom plan. If you were these wouldn't be changes that cost you money. They would be a part of the design phase. If you are working with someone who just builds plans as already drawn then of course there will be charges for any changes to that.

  • beckysharp Reinstate SW Unconditionally
    3 years ago

    I understand you're still in the planning stage, but have you signed a contract yet, or no? I suspect this might be part of the confusion, because it's not clear what stage you're at.

    Mark's comment is probably the most accurate, now and going forward: The reality of costs is that no matter what other people give you for estimated costs in this thread, you will be paying the person you choose to do the work what they charge you.

    We farm, and put a washing machine -- a secondhand one that a friend of a friend was getting rid of -- in the garage of our newly finished house (which we built ourselves) for chore clothes. We also installed a large secondhand stainless steel sink we found in a restaurant supply store. Another thing we've found helpful -- not sure if this is a possibility for you -- is a full bathroom with shower in the garage, and lots of hooks in the garage for coveralls and places to put boots etc.


  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    This builder decided what prefab cardboard box you fit into, and put you there. A pre planned cookie cutter house with a cookie cutter builder will charge for everything that is a change.

    You’re not dealing with an architect who designs what you need. And you’re not dealing with the guy who is going to build what the architect designed for your needs either. He is going to build what suits his strength as a builder. And he’s going to build it in the cheapest possible way that he can get away with building it, and maximizing change orders.

    If you think $600 is high for putting a sink right beside an already planned laundry stand pipe that only exists on paper, you ain’t seen nothing yet.

    Tske that contract to your lawyer. Shoulda done that on the front end. Find out how to part ways now. Before it gets much much worse.

  • beckysharp Reinstate SW Unconditionally
    3 years ago

    Tske that contract to your lawyer. Shoulda done that on the front end. Find out how to part ways now. Before it gets much much worse.

    +1 to what Sophie just wrote.

    You have a number of red flags on this project already -- this situation (washer/dryer/sink) and your deck situation in another thread, and questioning the cost of decorative trim on yet another thread, and you haven't even broken ground, if I understand the situation correctly. You're not happy with some of the costs/charges already, and there seems to be miscommunication not in your favor at this very early stage.

    Either grit your teeth and keep your checkbook handy, or get out while you can, even if it costs you some money.

  • Never Mind
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    We had issues that held up the closing of our loan on the land (construction loan), one was having ground testing done to insure we could find a suitable place to drill a well (we had a company come out and do electrical resistance ground testing to map suitable places to drill).

    We didn't have time to go back and forth on these 'smaller' details after finalizing the basement, we had to get a first draft of plans to the lender for the appraisal or we were going to miss our closing date and the seller was getting fidgety. We got the land at a good price in a soon-to-be highly desirable location, where my riding lesson business is going to thrive. And the builder did help us quite a bit with picking out a floor plan based on the slope of the land and the required square footage per the covenants. I am actually very happy with the little house we picked and how things have evolved as far as using my basement space for my professional work space (and thus not having to build an office with a bathroom out in a barn).

    We had a list of smaller things (smaller than building a basement that was not part of the house plans) such as a laundry sink, would work out pricing for in the second round and we'd just pay cash for anything beyond our loan amount. For example, we are doing sound proofing between the basement and main floor. We didn't have time to get pricing on that before we had to close for our construction loan.

    We are going back through and finalizing things like that now. There are only two things that we've kind of rolled our eyes at, and one of them was the cost of the rough-in sink next to the laundry room.

    We met with 3 other builders. I'm not looking for a 5th at this point. The house is pretty much finalized. And I totally realize I didn't hire an architect to custom design me a house. My house isn't the priority in my world. If it was I wouldn't have been living in a double wide mobile home for the last 18 years. ;-)

    My friend who is in construction suggested I show up the day the plumbers are there and offer them cash on the spot to rough in the laundry sink next to the washer.

    beckysharp - we actually made changes to the layout of the main floor so we can come into the mud room (that will have nearly ceiling to floor lockers and hooks on the wall) and go right to the stairs up to our master vs going around through the kitchen and living room to get to the stairs. So I will say as far as cookie cutter builders go they have been helpful and they didn't charge us for things like moving the main floor powder so I could have my 'short cut' through the house. :)

    They are even doing a nook under my basement stairs for my desk so I could make the most use out of my basement classroom. No extra charge for that. I was extremely tickled.

    Which is why I was shocked at the $600 to rough in a laundry sink next to the washer. I mean I'm not trying to deny a plumber making a living, or the builder getting a little something off of it as well, but $600? I think I'm going to email the supervisor, that has GOT to be some kind of mis-understanding.

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler
    3 years ago

    “My friend who is in construction suggested I show up the day the plumbers are there and offer them cash on the spot to rough in the laundry sink next to the washer.”

    Not gonna happen.You will need the larger pipe all the way back to the main to add a sink there. Thats why the upcharge. That’s got to be planned on the front end.

  • rockybird
    3 years ago

    If youre pretty much happy with everything else, I'd just pay the $600 and move on. In the grand scheme of things, it's not that much. You could push the issue and ask further to save some money but I'm not sure it's worth it.

  • Never Mind
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    ^ So thank you Sophie Wheeler ... I asked the gal at the builders office to explain the expense and she said... nothing informative.

    If it is a realistic charge then that is fine, but in my mind the washer is going RIGHT THERE, and they said multiple times in the basement planning that moving items with plumbing wasn't that big of a cost. Which is why I came here to ask "is that a realistic charge". The only experience I have that I can call upon is putting the bar sink in our current house.

    Yes, the utility sink is an after thought after we decided not to build our barn until we have moved in and have done the riding arena, and got a feel for the placement of the barn. But I need hot water daily for feeding the horses and a utility sink in the garage with the laundry seemed like a reasonable idea.

    I've been a single mom a majority of my adult life and have learned the hard way to 1. ask for an explanation until you are satisfied and understand 2. to get things in black and white. I have spent about 12 years as a single woman, and 18 years as the owner of this farm dealing with hired professionals (replacing a septic system in my barn, replacing the pump on our well, rewiring in a barn because of a fire, replacing the HVAC system in my current house ) - and I have learned to question, question, question. I am married now but my husband is military and will be gone for part of the time during the building process.

  • PRO
    Virgil Carter Fine Art
    3 years ago

    I hate to have to agree with earlier comments, but it sounds as if you are working with a builder who simply doesn't like changes to his existing plans. These sorts of projects really don't like changes from their existing plans, and charge accordingly to discourage changes.

    As long as you continue to work with this person I'm afraid you don't have many options.

  • beckysharp Reinstate SW Unconditionally
    3 years ago

    I've been a single mom a majority of my adult life and have learned the hard way to 1. ask for an explanation until you are satisfied and understand 2. to get things in black and white. I have spent about 12 years as a single woman, and 18 years as the owner of this farm dealing with hired professionals (replacing a septic system in my barn, replacing the pump on our well, rewiring in a barn because of a fire, replacing the HVAC system in my current house ) - and I have learned to question, question, question. I am married now but my husband is military and will be gone for part of the time during the building process.

    If you haven't done so already, have an independent (not connected in any way to your builder) competent real estate attorney review your contract with the builder to know exactly where you stand from hereon in. That black-and-white will save you lots of grief in the coming months.

    My house isn't the priority in my world. If it was I wouldn't have been living in a double wide mobile home for the last 18 years. ;-)

    Making one's house a priority does not mean financing an enormous and/or fancy house project. Making one's house a priority means building a small house if that's what you want and can afford, but making sure that it's done well. That goes for the layout, construction, etc. You're going to be spending a lot of money, time, and energy on this project. And you want things done a certain way, as you should. Which means your house is your priority, whether or not you think so : ) . And you're right to think so, because of that large expense of money, time, and energy. And the fact that your house will be your home and a big part of your life as well. There's nothing at all somehow wrong or shameful -- some would argue it's the exact opposite -- with making one's house one's priority.

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler
    3 years ago

    Your house doesn’t have to be a priority in order tho have a right sized family entrance from the exterior that contains both a bath and a laundry.

    Its the living in the house that’s a priority to an architect. Better design makes for less compromises in daily living. Better design improves your life. Because you don’t need to pay attention to the house and how it’s forcing you to live poorly in it.

    Any new house that has the laundry in a garage, is a poorly designed house. It’s not responding to what you need. And yes, the second set in the basement near the entry that is dedicated to just horse blankets makes sense with your life. That should have been planned in also.


  • chisue
    3 years ago

    My understanding is that this involves ONLY PLUMBING, not the machines or the sink itself.

    My understanding is that you are not *substituting* the plumbing for a washer, dryer, and laundry sink inside the house, but you are asking for *additional* plumbing for these three things in your garage. I don't think $600 is a lot of money for this duplicate plumbing work. (I would not eliminate the plumbing for these things inside the house; a future buyer may want that. You may want it.)

    If a builder builds the identical house over and over, there's an economy involved. When you change or add something as involved as plumbing, he has to spend time figuring out how to effect that change. (Is there adequate electric service for the garage setup? Will you use natural gas?)


  • Jake The Wonderdog
    3 years ago

    There are not significant changes to the plumbing that need to be made because of the sink. A laundry already requires a 2" drain. the supply for the washer is already going to be 1/2" minimum.

    I think more to the point is that in making this change they may have to evaluate everything... (is there room, does it impact any code issues, etc).

    I think there's also a bit of, "if you are going to make changes, you are going to pay for it... " mentality.

    Never Mind thanked Jake The Wonderdog
  • beckysharp Reinstate SW Unconditionally
    3 years ago

    I think there's also a bit of, "if you are going to make changes, you are going to pay for it... " mentality

    In a production build, even the slightest deviation is a change order with a cost attached. And a good part of that is to serve as discouragement, so that they can finish building cookie-cutter house #1,267 and move on to building #1,268 and #1,269. They make their money in volume, and producing volume on or ahead of schedule, not in change orders.

  • RaiKai
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    When we were in planning phase with our production builder and moved things around (ie for example we moved laundry hookups from a laundry closet to a laundry room, and changed laundry closet to an actual walk in closet) there were no charges as these were things that existed anyway - we just changed their placement in house. It was not a change order, just part of planning.

    However, to add things that were not there at all to start did cost. We added a second set of laundry hookups for example (I think it was $500-$600). The builder only planned for one set, even though it was right next to a bath where there would also be plumbing, so there is extra material, labour, and planning involved to ensure W/D would fit in space and have proper clearances etc. Changes after final plans are done also add change order fees as it can require order cancellations, redrafting, new or revised permit, etc.

    Part of the higher cost you are facing may be be as they just don’t want to do it. If they price it high enough, they are maybe counting on you not doing it.

  • Never Mind
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Rai Kai - hey :)

    Yeah we were going for a single floor layout, and we really didn't want the amount of sq ft the covenants required so were trying to find a floor plan that would either allow me to have an exterior entered office / classroom space or for us to MIL for a 'roommate' like we have now, where that person also farm sits for us.

    The builder said we'd be much better off cost wise due to the slope of the building location to do a basement and we picked this little house.

    They moved all kinds of things in the house, window placement, swapped the master bath and closet so you don't have to go through the bathroom to get into the closet.

    The basement had no 'plans', we were all winging it. When their design / plan came back the first time they had the basement divided front half and back half. We re-sketeched and asked for a 'left and right' so both spaces had windows / exterior door. Then we let them guide us as far as placement of the kitchenette and bathroom(s). Our initial thought was to only finish about half of the basement and initially they were going to rough out plumping for a sink and electric for an oven in the kitchenette based on cabinetry we already own, but the final cost to finishing and what we were getting down there was worth it so there was no individual cost to the rough outs in the basement kitchenette.

    I totally get being charged per add on. We almost added full laundry in the basement as well... which would have been water and electric for the dryer, but we opted to put an apartment size stacked unit down there instead. But yeah, that is why the house was so 'affordable' to start with. I was just surprised that plumbing for a sink right next to an already 'priced' washing machine was going to be $600. Again, I had a bar sink put in our existing 18 year old home's kitchen and it wasn't $600. The guy had to crawl under the house with the spiders, LOL.


  • Never Mind
    Original Author
    3 years ago


    Jake The Wonderdog

    "There are not significant changes to the plumbing that need to be made because of the sink. A laundry already requires a 2" drain. the supply for the washer is already going to be 1/2" minimum.

    I think more to the point is that in making this change they may have to evaluate everything... (is there room, does it impact any code issues, etc).

    I think there's also a bit of, "if you are going to make changes, you are going to pay for it... " mentality."

    And chisue

    "My understanding is that this involves ONLY PLUMBING, not the machines or the sink itself.

    My understanding is that you are not *substituting* the plumbing for a washer, dryer, and laundry sink inside the house, but you are asking for *additional* plumbing for these three things in your garage. I don't think $600 is a lot of money for this duplicate plumbing work. (I would not eliminate the plumbing for these things inside the house; a future buyer may want that. You may want it.)

    If a builder builds the identical house over and over, there's an economy involved. When you change or add something as involved as plumbing, he has to spend time figuring out how to effect that change. (Is there adequate electric service for the garage setup? Will you use natural gas?)"

    Ok, the ONLY washer, dryer and hot water heater will be in the garage. Those are the ONLY hook ups. That is a done deal. Everything is good with that. (Nothing is being duplicated).

    Now, I want to put a utility sink on the same wall as the washer / dryer / water heater. Just the plumbing, not the sink, not a faucet, not cabinetry. We will buy our own utility sink to fit our needs and install it ourselves. They quoted $600.00 to rough in for a sink on the same wall as the washing machine, dryer and water heater.

  • Never Mind
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    beckysharp

    I think there's also a bit of, "if you are going to make changes, you are going to pay for it... " mentality

    In a production build, even the slightest deviation is a change order with a cost attached. And a good part of that is to serve as discouragement, so that they can finish building cookie-cutter house #1,267 and move on to building #1,268 and #1,269. They make their money in volume, and producing volume on or ahead of schedule, not in change orders."

    Yes beckysharp, I understand that. For example, we did have to pay to move the laundry from what they called the laundry room (which we are re-purposing as a mud and storage room) into the garage. There was a $200 additional expense to stud the exterior garage wall as 2 X 6 and insulate it. I understand that. But 1. the stock plan already had the water heater in the garage and 2. we moved the plumbing into the garage already and 'paid' for that. Why $600 for a sink hook up? If someone could explain that I would be a smiling fool, and will have learned something today.

    And just to clarify we have not had final plans done. No permits yet. There isn't even electric and the well hasn't been drilled yet.

  • Never Mind
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Sophie Wheeler

    "Your house doesn’t have to be a priority in order tho have a right sized family entrance from the exterior that contains both a bath and a laundry."

    What on earth are you talking about? When were we EVER talking about an exterior entrance on this post... that contains a bath and laundry? HU?

    "Any new house that has the laundry in a garage, is a poorly designed house. It’s not responding to what you need. And yes, the second set in the basement near the entry that is dedicated to just horse blankets makes sense with your life. That should have been planned in also."

    Girl, move ALONG. You have no idea what the hell you are talking about. I WANT my laundry in the garage! You may not but don't tell me that is a poorly designed house because that is what I WANT.

    I am NOT going to have HORSE BLANKETS in my basement. What the hell are you smoking? The basement is MY OFFICE, NOT a tackroom.

    Take your high-horse self and moooooove along, sweetie.

  • Alison
    3 years ago
    Kaye I think Sophie was pointing out that laundry in garage as well as inferior family entrance as well as inferior bathroom set up were three major issues. Not the three were all together
  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    It’s really funny not funny that you took more time to check out my past posts than you did checking out your contractor and that contract. Is anyone really that shortsighted? You get more angry with the invisible person on the Internet telling the truth than you do at yourself for not doing enough due diligence before you committed to such a large purchase?

    You didn’t know what you didn’t know. Almost everyone is in that position when they start thinking to do a build. Most people do at least hire professionals to advise them when they’re confronted with a large amount of specialty knowledge that they don’t have enough time and energy to master.

    Whether an accountant for your taxes, or a computer specialist to set up a home network, or an architect to create a home, most people hire the folks that know more than they can learn about the subject.

    There’s the occasional few who have a years long timeline and spend it learning obsessively about the subject. But, the more they learn, the more likely those people come to realize that they can’t substitute dilettantism into a subject with someone who makes it their profession.

  • Mrs Pete
    3 years ago

    I don't think anyone's used the magic word here: Change Order. I think that's what's actually going on here.

    If I understand correctly, Kaye, you hurried to finalize your plans with the builder (and I'm taking that to mean signing of a contract between the two of you) so that you could get to the bank and finalize things. You didn't go over the "small things" thoroughly. But as far as the builder's concerned, you and he had A PLAN.

    After you have agreed to A PLAN, any changes are called Change Orders, and they cost big bucks. Yes, even if they aren't big changes, they cost more than if they'd been included in THE PLAN.

    Never Mind thanked Mrs Pete
  • Never Mind
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Mrs. Pete -

    We have a contract. They priced the basement with what we wanted, but we never saw the plans that got sent in for the appraisal, as far as the layout. And they left things on the plans sent for the appraisal that we didn't want (and have proof in writing).

    We had to get the appraisal done to not miss the closing date or the seller was going to walk (we had made them a low offer and they accepted, and I think were starting to regret).

    We have a whole list that is being edited / modified from what was drawn up for the basement. They said after this list was priced and finalized, and it all went ' to the drawing board' then any round of changes after that would incur a $350 fee, on top of any actual costs. So they said make any changes / edits you want now.

    I opted out of cabinets around / beside the refrigerator, and they credited us that amount... and I was willing to simply re-purpose them in the basement. We were going back and forth on shutters and they were willing to credit those too if we didn't want them.

    * shrugs *

    All I wanted to know is if a washer and water heater are going on the same wall, in new construction, does it really cost $600 to put a sink next to them (while still in the planning stage). Because that is not even close to what I paid to have a bar sink put in my 18 year old house. :)

  • Never Mind
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Sophie Wheeler - move on. You have no idea how we picked the builder we did, how many we met with prior to that decision, and the paperwork we did or did not read.

    Go 'help' someone else. Your flavor is not palatable to me.

  • PRO
    Mark Bischak, Architect
    3 years ago

    Would I be correct if I were to say you picked a plan that the builder has built before and you are making changes to it to fit your needs?

  • Mrs Pete
    3 years ago

    We have a contract

    Got it. Yes, they are upcharging you for this plumbing item because this change is being made post-contract.

    I think you're unfamiliar with this type of contract /business, and you've jumped in with both feet pretty quickly (I get it -- you were afraid you were going to lose the sale of the land), and this is the cost. You could say they're taking advantage of you -- you don't know what you don't know -- or you could say "Buyer Beware", but at this point it is what it is. If you want this plumbing change made, this is going to be the cost.

  • David Cary
    3 years ago

    You know - $600 is pretty fair given the change order. But doing it after the fact may not be that hard either and cost less that $600. There will be pex available behind the laundry and who cares what drywall looks there - if it is even drywalled. Ditto with the drain.

    Are you trying to put the sink on the washer side or the dryer side and which direction does water flow down the drain?

    Skipping permits in a low COLA, this is $200 after the fact (if it was $300 before in a tougher situation).

    And Sophie knows a lot more than you do about these sort of things. She has been around a lot longer than you have. She is trying to help - even if you don't like her style, your response was uncalled for.

  • millworkman
    3 years ago

    "I don't think anyone's used the magic word here: Change Order. I think that's what's actually going on here."


    ANYTHING that chnages the builder stock plan is a chnage order. Why do they charge for chnage orders? Because they can. Unfortunately you pay 2 to 3 times for upgrades and ad get pennies on the dollor if you remove something (plus a chnage order fee). You are purchasing a builders or developers type home. Stock plan is a stock plan, move a switch 6 inches and pay a chnage order fee, thats just the way it is done with this type of house.

  • millworkman
    3 years ago

    As David states, Sophie is seldom wrong, definitely blunt and right to the point but seldom completely wrong. You need a thicker skin and the ability to skip over posts and or advice you don't want to hear..............................

  • Michael Lamb
    3 years ago

    In my current residence(a townhouse), we have a stacked washer and dryer in our basement. When we bought the place 10 years ago, we had plumbers come in and rip out the old poly butelyne piping and install whatever the flavor of the day was. As part of that project, we said hey, can you add a laundry sink next to the washer and dryer? They did, and they did not have to rip out any drain pipes or bust up any concrete. They just tapped into the existing drain.

    Ask the plumber working onsite how much he would charge you to come back after you move in and add the sink for you, and bypass your builder.

    Personally, I can see the benefits of putting the laundry in the garage, provided you live somewhere where it does not go below freezing. Keeps heat out of the house, some dirty clothes never have to enter the house, and a leak is less likely to cause major damage. Plus you will probably have easy access to your dryer vent pipe for cleaning it out. But if your garage gets too cold, it could shorten the life of the rubber parts on the washer and dryer. As it gets colder, the rubber becomes less flexible/pliable and will wear out quicker.

    Never Mind thanked Michael Lamb
  • chisue
    3 years ago

    OK, I got it now. You will have no indoor laundry (for resale). You only want plumbing added next to the washing machine already agreed upon In The Garage. Good idea here about asking for a bid from a plumber to do the work after you are in the house. The builder's $600 is excessive. High bids usually indicate that the work is not wanted.

  • cpartist
    3 years ago

    Just wanted to say the person who in this thread was out of line was NOT Sophie but the person who started the thread. Your comments to Sophie (who is obviously more knowledgeable about home building than you'll ever be) was rude and uncalled for.

  • bry911
    3 years ago

    Largely, I think the question of whether or not it is a fair price is moot. You have a signed contract with him, you apparently like him and don't want to sever the relationship with him, so the question is really, should you pay it or not.

    I believe the answer to that question is yes you should. Your only options are have him do it, do without, do it yourself, or have someone else do it after the build is over. If you are comfortable doing the work yourself, have at it and we don't need to examine the value anymore. If you decide that having it isn't worth the money, then again, great.

    However, if the question is pay your builder his high price or pay a plumber to do it later, I would pay the builder. In my area a plumber isn't coming to my house, pulling a permit and doing work for less than $400-$500 dollars, regardless of how long it takes to do the work. That is just their opportunity cost of taking the job. To me, it isn't worth the trouble to have it done later. You can always try the counter offer, and just offer him $450 to do it, but if he says no, it isn't like you are going to fire him, so expect him to say no.

  • bry911
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Your comments to Sophie (who is obviously more knowledgeable about home building than you'll ever be) was rude and uncalled for.

    To be fair, while I often agree with the things Sophie says, she (he) is also rude, judgmental and very often gives damning assessments on overall projects or designs that are unrelated to specific question asked. I believe Sophie is an acquired taste, but I completely understand those unwilling to overlook the tone in deference to the quality the advise.

    So while I often agree with Sophie and believe her (him) to be informed, wise and intelligent, let's not pretend that she is Miss Congeniality. Plus Sophie does a fair job sticking up for Sophie...

  • bry911
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    The sermon against self-righteous behavior? Really?

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler
    3 years ago

    The deliberate irony is only lost on the mouth frothers too ticked off to have a sense of humor.

  • Sam Goh
    3 years ago

    I was quoted $900 yesterday ($500 labor $400 sink) to add one to the laundry room yesterday. Will this make the OP happier? :)

  • PRO
    Mark Bischak, Architect
    3 years ago

    I think the OP has left Houzz.