How does this work...son hit neighbors garage with car

always1stepbehind

Neighbor asks how do I want to handle it, asks if we have auto insurance and I say yes, but I may want to pay out of pocket rather than going through our auto insurance. My son was just added 2 weeks ago to my insurance, I don't know how this would affect his already expensive rate!! yikes.

We have detached garages that are basically old car ports that were enclosed.

They said the are going to contact their homeowners insurance to ask them what they are supposed to do.

So how does that work if they contact their homeowners insurance? Who determines who does the repairs etc?

Will I even have a choice to not get my insurance involved, will their homeowners contact me to get my auto insurance info to contact them directly??

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Olychick

Their homeowners' insurance likely is not going to get involved if it was your son's fault. Their insurance company probably won't care if you file a claim with your insurance or pay out of pocket. Of course, if their insurance company happens to be the same company as yours, then you won't have a choice about notification, even if you don't file a claim.

Generally, your neighbor would get estimates on repairs and hire their workers of choice, you or your insurance company would pay. I doubt, unlike some homeowner's insurance, that an auto insurance company provides certain companies you have to use for repairs to buildings. They may require 3 bids and only pay for the lowest one, however. I'd have them get some bids before deciding out of pocket or insurance. Worst case would be your insurance company cancelling your policy (on your son, or even your whole family).

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Georgysmom

How much damage was done? It probably would be cheaper, in the long run, to just have them get it fixed and pay for it.

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ldstarr

This scenario is why many agents recommend that all youth drivers be on their own policy. At least if the young driver is involved in an accident or something like your son's misfortune, only their policy increases or is cancelled.

I'd ask the neighbor to please not involve their homeowner's insurance. The homeowner's won't pay anything, and absolutely will go back to your auto policy, if a claim is filed. Have the neighbors get an estimate for the repairs, and if you're comfortable with the amount, pay for it. Otherwise, you have no choice but to place a claim with your auto policy.

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arcy_gw

I would tell him to let you know his plan, negotiate a price if he gets wonky and hand him cash-DONE. Your insurance, whether the same as the homeowners or not cannot MAKE YOU file a claim. It would have to be one heck for a fix it job for it to be worth filing a claim. Your son's Ins. would absolutely go up and it will stay up!! Think of that cost over the next say five+ years.

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always1stepbehind

Personally I think it would be cheaper to pay to have it fixed than filing a claim. It's only a wood portion on one side and it didn't damage any stucco. They also mentioned going through the HOA...apparently her parents garage (same condos as ours) burned down and when they had it rebuilt, the HOA wanted it brought to current codes. I guess it was a big ordeal.

I hope it doesn't turn into some crazy thing.

I know it is up the them to have whoever they want to fix it, but would it be out of line for me to have someone look at it too?

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always1stepbehind

I was hoping they'd be open to get prices to have it fixed and go from there, but when they mentioned homeowners insurance and the HOA I didn't feel like I could say "We don't need to do that"!! Really what I wanted to say is "Hey, I know a guy" LOL

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Lucille

I think it might be good just to sit tight and see what they come up with. I can kind of see what they might be thinking, that if they get it fixed without insurance or the HOA, and it turns out not to be a good job, or the HOA decides that they should have been notified, it is not beyond reality that they may have to have it done over either on their dime or with a lot of hassle.

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Michael

Absolutely notify the HOA, or read your governing documents.

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mamapinky0

I have no advice but wanted to say I'm sorry this happened..your probably grinding your teeth...KIDS!!!!

did you ground him from the car?

It will all work out.

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rockybird

I might just be honest with them. Tell them you are really sorry and he has only been driving for two weeks. Let them know that if possible, you would like to pay out of pocket. Just be careful that there was no structural damage and that there is no risk of a medical claim in any way. You dont want this to escalate into a more pricey situation.

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Olychick

"I know it is up the them to have whoever they want to fix it, but would it be out of line for me to have someone look at it too?"

Can you have someone look at it without trespassing on their property? If, so, I would definitely have someone I trust take a look, since you don't want to just take their word for it that whoever they use is giving you a fair price. The best thing, I think, would be asking them to get 3 bids and hopefully you can agree on someone to do the work at a fair price.

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always1stepbehind

Oly, yes the garages back up to the shared parking area so anyone walking by can see the damage. I will wait to see what they come back with and if I decide to bring up me having someone look at it myself, I'd propose in a way that I want to get some feedback to see if it's something I should pay out on my own or go through my insurance.

I just hope they aren't the type of people to turn it in to more than it needs to be.


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joyfulguy

It seems to me wise to take into account the suggestion that someone made about figuring in the cost of the increase in your son's insurance over the next number of years.

How well do you get along with your neighbour?

Are either - or both - of you handy with a hammer and a saw?

Any possibility of you doing the repairs yourselves (and the son should be dragooned in to help), and you put some (much smaller amount of) funds into you neighbour's pocket? Any other close-by neighbours/friends with such skills, who might be inclined to help?

ole joyful

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Dolly

If you know someone who you trust to do the work, why not have them take a look and offer to take care of the repairs? I think the main concern is having the garage returned to the condition before this mishap. The neighbor may even prefer to have you take care of it and avoid the headache.

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always1stepbehind

I don't know these neighbors, just met them this morning...but I'm hoping my scenario plays out just as Dolly posted. I do know someone that could fix it. I already had in my head last night that I'd have him come take a look at it. He's a framer, builds houses so this would be a walk in the park for him. But now I need to wait on the neighbor.

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Michael

This isn't a job for some handy guy. The repair should be made by a qualified, licensed contractor or you may be liable for future failure of the repaired section. Proceed with caution.

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Lucille

Agree. Preferably, the neighbor's qualified licensed contractor.

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chisue

Will your neighbor need a permit from your municipality? Best to do this all 'by the book' as far as the repairs. I'd get an estimate from the 'guy you know' --if only to determine cost range. Whoever pays for the repairs needs to get a lien release from the worker or company before paying.

Kids indeed! One of our neighbors was teaching his DD to drive. He backed his car out of the garage and closed the garage door. DD was to back out into the street. She shifted into Drive and went through not only the garage door, but the rear wall of the garage. See? It could be worse.

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always1stepbehind

Who said this framer I was thinking of wasn't licensed? I'm not trying to get it fixed on a cheap buck to benefit myself. I would expect a qualified person for myself or for them. I just don't want to be taken advantage of either.

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mamapinky0

Always....some advice you did not ask for because I've been in similar situations and you know how I am with advice from the laundry room. Lol. I hope your having your son earn/ or somehow pay for damages reimbursing you. Kids have to learn that even though it was an accident they must be responsible for damages. I know a lady whose son 18yo was out throwing stones and took my window out. She payed to replace the window which was fine but since I know her quite well I ask if she was planning to have her son reimburse her...she looked at me as if I was a loose cannon and said. *no it was an accident why should he pay me back* Few months ago this boy got a hefty speeding ticket...mom payed the fine.

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Anglophilia

Hope she enjoys paying this no-good kid's bail someday soon!

I agree - son should not only help pay for this, but should lose some driving privileges as well. He needs a LOT of supervision when driving.

Insurance for a teenage boy is horrendous. Just hope your insurance company does not find out about this. They can raise your rates even if you don't file a claim but son still caused the damage. I have a feeling this is going to be far more complicated and costly than you are thinking it will be.

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maifleur01

Without seeing a picture or being there beyond the cosmetic damage there may also be structural damage so be prepared.

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always1stepbehind

Usually I just let the UGLY slide here....but how dare you Anglophilia....you know nothing about my son to say something so ugly. Shame,Shame, Shame. My guess is you have no kids. Otherwise you would know better than say anything like that about someones kid you know nothing about.


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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Always1stepbehind, I don’t think she was talking about your son, but the one throwing rocks. When my daughter was a teen she tried to retrieve the toll pass thing that fell under the seat and rolled into the barrier. Stuff happens.

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PKponder TX Z7B

Yeah, she was talking about the (parentally induced) irresponsible kid that Mamapinky was telling the rock throwing story about.



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Angela Id

"Usually I just let the UGLY slide here....but how dare you Anglophilia....you know nothing about my son to say something so ugly. Shame,Shame, Shame. My guess is you have no kids. Otherwise you would know better than say anything like that about someones kid you know nothing about."

Whoa, slow down there, speedy Gonzales ...

She wasn't even referring to your child. Talk about UGLY!

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always1stepbehind

Sorry for reading that as directed at my son....

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Elmer J Fudd

If one of my kids had had an encounter with a fixed object or worse early in their driving career, they would have rediscovered life as a pedestrian and as a user of public transportation for an appropriate period of time. And paid for any damage. Fortunately, my advance threats to that extent and good luck were enough for them all to avoid any such problems.

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sephia_wa

If you have an HOA, be sure to read your governing documents (declaration, CC&R's, etc). They typically spell out requirements for making repairs to things that are visible to ensure conformity to existing structures. You could go to all the effort to make repairs and then get called out for not getting approval from the HOA. Some HOAs are stricter than others. Yours may want to see building plans, permits, the contractor's license, insurance, etc. If you make the repairs without their approval, you risk having to tear down the repairs, or get fined for not following the rules.

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ratherbesewing

Wow, this is getting complicated. Ask the homeowners to get an estimate for the repair. No offense, but if they don't know you, they probably won't want your guy. From there, you can decide if it's worth going thru your auto insurance provider. Consider your deductible in the equation. My deductible is $1000, so I would pay out of pocket if the bill comes in at $1200. Good luck.

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Lucille

Who said this framer I was thinking of wasn't licensed?

No one said that. We are trying to point out possible pitfalls down the road, for your benefit. While some of what we say may be obvious to you, some others, such as the power of a HOA to have the entire project redone if it does not fit into their requirements, are mentioned to save you money. Everyone here is on your side.

I just don't want to be taken advantage of either.

Absolutely reasonable. As I said before, you can sit tight and see what they come up with. It would be perfectly reasonable for you to ask to review the quote before repairs are made (and thus have a basis for cost comparisons).

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Joseph Corlett, LLC

You can't stop your neighbors from filing an insurance claim. When their insurance company sees who's at fault, they will pay the claim then subrogate its costs to your insurance company.


I'd ask the neighbor to get an estimate or two, and when it's fixed to their satisfaction, pay it immediately.

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Debby

On a side note: this is why my parents refused to put us on their insurance and I refused to put my kids on ours. My sisters daughter ran a stop sign and was t-boned and totalled her car. My sisters insurance went up a lot! She asked what she should do. I said pay the normal insurance rate and tell your daughter she has to pay the difference. Then take her off your insurance. The point I'm making is: your son needs to pay the damages. Not you. If he doesn't have a job he needs to get one. It will make him more responsible and he'll be more careful the next time he gets behind the wheel of a car knowing it'll be on his dime and his parents won't bail him out.

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live_wire_oak

If the neighbors get in touch with their insurance company, your insurance company will know about it. There goes any advantage of not filing a claim. The accident will be on his record with them whether or not you file a claim. You might as well file a claim.

The only scenario that benefits you is if they don't contact their insurance company. Sounds like it's too late for that.

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nicole___

Does your policy have a forgiveness clause for the first accident ?


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Rose Pekelnicky

Many years ago something similar happened to us, although we were in the neighbor's position. Our neighbor's son came home from an errand and parked the car in their driveway, which was on an incline. The car was a manual transmission and they had been having trouble with it jumping out of gear. He went in their house and the car rolled down their driveway, across the side road between our houses and through our yard, hitting our house. It took out some shrubs, broke the children's swing set and damaged our house. He then noticed the car up against our house, ran over and drove it back home. No one came over to discuss it with us so after an hour we called our homeowners agent to see what to do. He said, since the boy had driven the car away, to call the police. An officer came, looked at it, talked to us and talked to the neighbor.

She wanted to just pay for the damage but knowing some things we did, we were afraid we would never be compensated so we encouraged her to turn it into her insurance. An adjuster came, assessed the damage, and we received a check. My husband did repair the house himself and I don't thin k she liked that, but I believe he was entitled to compensation for his time.

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always1stepbehind

I didn't think about them thinking I would not pay. That's a good point. I will check with them either later today or tomorrow after work to see how they want to proceed. Our HOA is iffy, so it could go either way with them.

To answer Nicole, I don't think my policy has a forgiveness plan. But I think I am better off paying out of pocket on this.

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mamapinky0

I shouldn't have given my advice about something the OP didn't even ask for. I'm sorry. I think I'm being helpful in a small way forgetting it could take the focus off of the original question. I'm sorry Always.

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always1stepbehind

No apology necessary MamaP.

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two25acres

Have the neighbor get some estimates, work out the details with the HOA and find a contractor everyone is happy with. By all means have your son assist with some of this, he is responsible and needs to learn there are consequences to our actions, in the long run it will help him. If you can avoid an auto insurance claim, by all means do so but make sure once the work is done that there is no way for the neighbors to milk you for more. Have them sign something. As for an insurance claim, he will have an at fault accident, he will lose any driving discounts he may currently have and may end up with a surcharge for up to 3 years. This little incident if filed could end up costing 3 times what the repairs will cost. Save your claims for the big stuff. If you do decide to file a claim, the increase to premiums should only apply to the auto your son is rated on.

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dances_in_garden

I know here (Canada, Ontario) my insurance would have to cover it, because it is my garage door on my property. They can always ask you (or you can offer out of courtesy) to pay the deductible. If they find that their policy will be cancelled or the rate will increase too much, you can then offer to pay for the entire repair. Ask them to give you a couple of estimates (that is only fair).

We just went through a similar thing regarding a fence damaged by a neighbour's son's motorcycle. We found out our deductible is higher than the cost to repair the fence, so I went over and talked to them about it. They offered to have it repaired by a friend who owns a fencing company. I checked references and made sure we had a written agreement as to what would be done/repaired and it worked out well for us.

Dances.

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always1stepbehind

Well before I had to a chance to go follow up with neighbor, they already had an adjuster out. I was getting ready yesterday morning and my bedroom over looks the parking area and their garage area. I noticed a man getting out of a sedan, polo shirt, khakis...next thing I see him taking pics of the damages. Neighbor comes out etc etc. So I have to assume it's an adjuster for their homeowners insurance.

I was curious as to how that would work if their homeowners insurance is involved...so I called the agent who handles all our insurance here at work and explained the situation to her. She said I would hear from their insurance with a price of repairs and then I could decide how to handle it from my side.

She did say that even though it wasn't another car my son hit, it would be considered an auto accident.

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imstillchloecat

always1stepbehind - you sound surprised that this would be considered an auto accident? If your son had hit a retaining wall or a light pole or a bus stop or a store building, wouldn't you consider that an automobile crash?


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always1stepbehind

I didn't know what it could be considered. I don't know how it works, whether it depends if another vehicle is involved or not.

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imstillchloecat

If you (in general) are driving a car and you (in general) hit: another car, a person, a building, a light pole, a wall, an earthen berm, or anything else - it's an automobile crash.

As an aside, I despise using the term "accident" instead of crash or wreck.

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Elmer J Fudd

chloecat, where's George Carlin when we need him. I always enjoyed his musings on illogical word usage, like "What's with this near-miss bit when it comes to airplanes? It wasn't a near-miss, it was a near-hit."

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two25acres

If claimed to your auto insurance carrier it will be considered an at fault accident and will pay out under property damage for the garage and if there's damage to his car and its covered with collision then the collision part of the policy will cover his damages to his car. At fault is the key.

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Chi

How did he hit the neighbor's garage? It's not relevant to your question but I'm curious! Is it near your driveway?

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artemis_ma

I haven't read all the responses, but I'd volunteer to pay out of pocket.

Although back in 1992, I was hosting a party when a freak storm blew through and dropped a tree on my housemate's back windshield and on another car's mirror... that couple had fortuitously parked at an angle in my driveway, so it had fallen parallel to the car, so this was their only damage.

I paid for the mirror replacement out of pocket, but went through with the insurance claim for my housemate's car. My rates did go up, but not long term. I had just moved to the house about 4 months prior, so didn't have a lot of expendable cash.

Your insurance company will want to know WHY this happened, and that may determine how they handle coverage afterwards.

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always1stepbehind

Chi. We are in a condo so there are common area parking space besides our own garage...so he was parking in one of the lots. ETA: His friend had been showing him how to back in to a parking spot previously. I guess he decided he'd try it in our parking area. He pulled forward but didn't put it in to reverse and went forward into the neighbors garage. Sound likes when the realized and panic set in, he pushed down even harder...on the gas!!

I told him "I've been driving 35+ years and I still am not 100% confident backing into a space". Just pull in next time!!

I did impress myself parallel parking this weekend though. Don't like to do that either if I don't have to ;-)

Acres: it definitely was his fault.

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Elmer J Fudd

always, I sense a different message to impress upon him from this incident:

Hey buddy, until you get a lot older, "advice" from your friends is very often not going to be good advice. I hold you responsible for the choices and decisions you make and you better be making them with your own head, not someone else's.

_____________________

It's very poor judgement for a new driver to try to back into a parking space. This isn't a very good start to his driving career.

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chisue

OT -- Many locals in Hawaii routinely 'back in' everywhere -- at the grocery store, at Target, in their garages. I have no idea why. Will they need fast getaways? Some hotels and condos now have signs saying "No Back In". It's pretty scary for the person driving down a parking lot aisle because you won't see any backup lights; someone just 'pulls out' in front of you. (The KT had a thread once about pulling forward through an empty parking ahead of them rather than backing out of the space they'd occupied. Drivers in the farther aisle see no warning backup lights.)

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Jasdip

I always, always back into parking spots. Whether it's in open parking lots, or underground garages, or even in my parking spot at home.

I much, much prefer driving out where I can see everything, rather than backing out and hitting a pedestrian who's on their phone, a runaway toddler, etc.

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Elmer J Fudd

A problem with backing in is that curbs or concrete wheel stops are placed for a front wheel. Rear wheels, especially with trucks, can be farther away from the bumper than front wheels and by backing in, the vehicle may hit what's behind the parking spot (like foliage or a light pole) or overhang into the adjacent spot. Plus, how would one conveniently load something into the trunk when backed all the way into such a position?


Most cars have backup cameras these days and many have side detectors for coming cars and people . It's easier to back out of a spot than it used to be. I more often see a backed in car crookedly positioned or over the line in the parking space than ones pulled in head first, so I don't give extra car handling expertise points to people who back in.

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Chi

I rarely back onto spots. I used to try to pull forward whenever possible but cameras are so good these days with the wide lenses that I can see much better backing up than pulling forward. If you are parked next to a big vehicle, you have to blindly pull forward a little bit just to be able to see and that's dangerous if there's a person or car behind those vehicles.

I also get annoyed being behind someone who decides to back in, then adjust a few times, taking up the entire parking lot lane while they do it. I don't know if it's safe to pull around them because their movements are so jerky.

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imstillchloecat

I always back into my parking space at work - I deliberately park on the end of a row (under a tree - especially nice in the summer) so my view is not obscured as I'm pulling out of the space. There are no wheelstops in our parking lot, and my backup camera lets me know when I'm at the edge of the pavement. Regarding placement of wheelstops, though - the splitter on the front end of my car is so low that those things will damage my car. Yet another reason to back in.

And I parallel park my car every day in front of my house. Ah... City living. lol

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einportlandor

Oh for cryin' out loud! New drivers have fender benders all the time. It doesn't make them irresponsible. It makes them inexperienced. That's why their insurance is so high! We weren't great drivers when we were first starting out either, although we probably didn't realize it at the time. I recall an elderly woman hitting my car with her umbrella because I stopped too close to her while she was crossing the street. Yikes!

My oldest child dinged a teacher's car in the school parking lot two weeks after getting her license. I asked the teacher to get estimates for the repair and I paid him directly to avoid an insurance claim. My next kid got flustered during a driving lesson, hit the gas instead of the brake, and rammed into a car in a nearly empty parking lot! Fortunately her "victim" was also a mother of a teen and handled the situation with grace and understanding. My insurance agent didn't bat an eye. These same kids are now responsible, upstanding adults with excellent driving records.

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Elmer J Fudd

As kids start to be given responsibility, whether driving or other things, I think they need to be given clear standards and expectations. It matters. I set high standards for each when it came to driving (" you can kill other people, you can kill yourself, you can cause a lot of damage, and I don't want any of those things to happen but it's up to you to be very, very careful every moment") and didn't have as much as a scratch from any of their driving adventures. The newish but used car I'd purchased as the "kids car" for the first kid was still being driven with no body damage by one of my kids 12 years later.

Some luck helped, but I disagree. Not all new drivers have fender benders all the time.

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imstillchloecat

True, Elmer - I've never had an at-fault crash, and I've been driving since I was 14. I've been rear-ended twice (once by a texting driver while I was sitting at a stoplight, once by an inattentive driver who was not paying attention to traffic stopped for a crash on the highway); and I've been t-boned twice (once by a teenager who pulled out of a driveway and once by someone backing out of a parking spot in a parking lot, when I was stopped in a line of traffic trying to exit said lot).

DD was taught to drive safely and defensively, by a long line of former racecar drivers (as was I). Racecar drivers have a different "take" on driving than the general public who just guide a car along a street. lol

DD did have a couple of wrecks when she had been driving for about three years - she was sideswiped in a "double-left turn" and was rear-ended by one of her friends. oops. haha

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Chi

I've been lucky enough to never to have been in an accident. I drive very defensively and I've been able to avoid a number of idiots that otherwise would have hit me.

Is it normal for new drivers to hit things? I don't remember many friends having accidents. I wonder what the statistics are.

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rhizo_1 (North AL) zone 7

I'm a terrible backer upper, hopelessly inept. I can parallel park but haven't had to in many years.

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Elmer J Fudd

I have a car that will parallel park itself at the push of a button. It does best when there are cars both in front and behind the open spot and when the curb is straight. It's lazy to use but fun.

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raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio

I get so annoyed by the folks who are driving large trucks or SUVs and back into the spaces at work -- and unfortunately, more often than not, they do protrude into the space behind (spaces are at a premium and not roomy), which then forces the vehicle parking there to stick out into the driving lane. Kudos to those of you who can back in without doing this.

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Michael

always,

Has there been a decision? How's it being handled? Is HOA insurance involved yet?

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always1stepbehind

Nothing yet. I feel like I need to check in with them so they don't think I'm blowing them off but then I think maybe since I had seen what I assumed was an adjuster out on Monday morning, maybe they were told not to contact me and maybe that is why I have heardn't from them directly...??

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ldstarr

Our town has back-in angle parking only along "main" street. I'm baffled by the number of people that seem to find it difficult. I prefer it to when we had pull in parking, because now, the traffic has to stop while you are backing in, rather than you trying to find a break in the traffic to back out. My recommendation to people uncomfortable with backing in is to find a lonely parking lot and practice, practice, practice. In most situations, it is much safer to pull out of a parking place.

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always1stepbehind

ok...just got a phone call from the Property Mgmt company for our condos. Because everything has to be uniform, the damage will be fixed by their maintenance crew. They should have a price for me tomorrow. They do not take care of the garage doors so that is between me and neighbor separately.

ETA: Since I have heard from the property mgt company, I feel confident going over to talk to neighbor since I do have some info at this point.

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Michael

My town has plenty of these.


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yeonassky

Glad that this is on its way to being resolved. There's nothing like waiting and wondering to make one stressed. Best of luck.

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Michael

always, that's the best way to handle the settlement.


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vicsgirl

A year from now this will only be a blip in your rear-view mirror.

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VedaBeeps SoCal 9b/10a

"It's very poor judgement for a new driver to try to back into a parking space. This isn't a very good start to his driving career."

Backing into a space is part of the driving test where I was first licensed (as well as parallel parking.) As a result, everyone practiced it and was good at it from the beginning of their driving career. It should be required everywhere since it's a necessary driving skill. (No back up cameras here- my current daily driver is 64 years old.)

Glad to hear the ball is rolling on the repair, Always. Maybe this will be a bonding moment with the neighbors and you'll end up with some new friends out of this adventure.

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Jasdip

I don't have back-up cameras on my car, it's just my personal preference to back in.

The hospital parking spots are narrow, in the parking garage. Yesterday it took me a couple of times to try and back in between a big pick up and a car. No one was waiting for me to park. I finally gave up and drove in. I had to do a wide berth to get situated in to drive in straight. If I'm on an angle at all when backing in I correct it. I don't leave it like that. But I see many, many people parked crooked and over the line who drove in.

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always1stepbehind

Backing up must have been before my time. I remember having to do a 3 point turn..I think that is what it is called. I don't know if I had to back up some but whatever it was I didn't put it back in gear...and that is where I failed.

Currently on the driving test, they have to pull over to a curb and back up so many feet. Then at the very end of the test there are 4 or 5 parking spots designated in the DMV parking lot where they need to pull in to.

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Brianna Newcomer

I know this is super old, but I'm reading it now because of course I googled what to do when you're neighbor hits your garage, and after reading some of the comments I just have to add for anyone reading now like myself, if you think backing into a space isn't necessary, clearly you've never driven a very large SUV or truck. I have a very narrow strip that has parking spaces on one side and garages on the other - the very end garage, which so happens to be mine, sticks out further than the rest, I drive a very large Lincoln Navigator with third row seating, I cannot get in and out of my garage without backing in, it just cannot be done - to even be able to get to my garage to back in is to reverse all the way down the narrow strip... its parking spaces, enough spaces for an average size car and a half MAYBE to drive through and garages on the other side of those spaces, of course at my garage there is JUST enough space to fit my large SUV between my garage and the car parked across from it, then where my garage ends the curb begins, so even if I somehow did magic and got in front facing I'd still have to reverse out and all the way down the narrow strip in reverse to get out as there is no way to exit turning right, it is a very stupid design. But, my new neighbors have two large SUV'S, which they keep parking across from my garage, but they are too stupid to reverse into those spaces or lack the common sense not to park in the hardest spaces to get in and out of when they aren't skilled enough drivers to reverse their SUVs in... They have backed into my garage door AT LEAST 4 times now, nothing major YET, but I'm waiting for tomorrow morning to come and them to hit my garage yet again trying to reverse out of the narrow space they so idiotcally pulled into front end first. So I'm just preemptively looking into what I should do when they finally do serious damage. Reversing is an important driving skill!!!!! Learn how to do it. And if you choose to drive an extra large vehicle, know how to actually drive that vehicle or get a smaller vehicle if you're too stupid to figure out how to properly drive it. How the hell do people get their license not knowing how to reverse!?!?!

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Raye Smith

Brianna - Yes, large SUV and truck should always be facing out of a parking space with the exception of angled parking. Otherwise, it's impossible for other drivers to see around the back end of those vehicles for them to pull out. Also, many business required all trucks to be backed in, it's a safety thing. On many pipe yards I've seen signs stating that "Employees that don't back into their parking place will be fired".

Brianna - make sure you are photographing the damage to that door. I would also try to put something on or before the door to help make if more visible to the bad drivers.

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arcy_gw

Not sure why backing in first is safer than backing out later. When I took Driver's ed half century ago I was taught to always walk around the vehicle, looking behind for obstacles before backing out of anywhere. Today my car has a back up camera. Backing up is "the most dangerous" part of driving we were taught. Seems like caution is the need.

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Raye Smith

Backing in a large vehicle gives the vehicles parked around it more ability to see on-coming traffic as they are backed out.

There's more lag time in backing out in a parking lot than in backing into a space. While you're getting into the car, putting up packages, fastening your seatbelt, etc, children, bicycles and such have time to get behind the vehicle where they can't be seen by the driver. Not all vehicles have a backup camera yet.

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morz8

I had a single width long driveway at my former house - for many years. I always backed in, or did after just one dead battery and no way to conveniently get to the front of the car with jumper cables ;0) It was a lesson quickly learned, although it didn't take backing into or damaging anything.

I think that was the only time I've ever had a car battery fail, but still a memorable event.

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always1stepbehind

I think I did end up updating on a new thread last year when all this happened. But NO I did not end up finding new friends with these neighbors...I never really see them out. But I do get annoyed when I see the husbands car parked out in the parking lot instead of in his garage with the new door I paid for!! LOL

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Angela Id

If you can't pull into your own parking space, maybe you are the one too "stupid" to drive and should get into a smaller vehicle.

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colleenoz

Backing in is safer for a lot of reasons, particularly in car parks. When you're backing in, you're unlikely to have other vehicles or pedestrians going behind you as can happen when you're backing out. Plus, when you back in, you're at the open end of the space so you can better see other vehicles and pedestrians before you pull out of the space. When you go in front first, you're effectively down a hole (especially if larger vehicles such as vans are parked on either side of you) and it's harder to see if it's safe to pull out.

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Jasdip

This past fall my car starter and battery both died, and I had to get it towed. I happened to have pulled into the parking spot at the plaza. The tow truck driver said that I should always back in to parking spots, in case of events like this......car failure.

I assured her I do, 99% of the time, which is true.

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Elmer J Fudd

I'm with Angela. I can only chuckle when someone suffering from a deflated macho needs to drive an over-sized vehicle. And then parks in a space intended for passenger cars. Right next to me such that I have trouble getting into my car.

If your vehicle is so big it doesn't fit in a parking space, or if you can't back out and leave without going back and forth 3 times. leave your oversized vehicle parked at home and take something more reasonable to public parking lots. Or park at the far end, away from everyone.

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rob333 (zone 7a)

backing into a spot for a dead battery won't work for a Miata!


;)


Battery is in the trunk, vented to the outside. Weirdest battery ever.

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Elmer J Fudd

The battery of a Mercedes I had not too long ago was under the rear seat.

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rob333 (zone 7a)

I guess one would not jump start a rear seat battery Mercedes.

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Texas_Gem

The problem for me with backing into a parking space is that frequently, the vehicle behind me pulls so close to my SUV that I can't open the lift gate to load my groceries!

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Elmer J Fudd

"I guess one would not jump start a rear seat battery Mercedes."

I think it happened a number of times, at least 3. Each time from someone leaving a door open (interior light) or headlights on. And drat, bad luck that each time it happened was the day off for both my chauffeur and my butler, so I had to get involved.

Back to reality, the first time, the tow truck driver shows up, opens the hood and says "Hey, there's no battery here". A few moments with the manual answered the question but it was surprising all the same.

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Raye Smith

I drive a large truck, I find backing it into a parking space quite easy. One of the things that I usually do is to park slightly angled with the front closer to the passenger side line and the back closer to the driver side line. It adds just a little more room for me to get in/out and a little more room for the driver beside me to get in/out. It probably gives the other driver more room than it gives me. It also makes it easier for me to load groceries onto the passenger seat.

My truck isn't for "pretty", it has to haul wood, tree debris, gravel and so on.

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Elmer J Fudd

If you back in crooked AND the left side of your vehicle is closer to the line than is the right, you're giving the driver side parked next to you less room , not more. Glad it makes it easier for you, the heck with anyone else.

You haul large loads every day?

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artemis_ma

In my current car, I hate backing in. No, I do NOT have one of those rear cameras (my car is a 2014 model). It also has a serious blind spot for dealing with a car I might be backing in next to. Pull in, back out Very Carefully. If I have the option when parking, I pull in all the way through, and pull out forward. Not always possible but that's my preference. In my garage, I pull in and back out. I can better gauge the mirror and the garage door that way -- since when I pull in, I want the driver side mirror to be only a couple inches from the edge of the door. Were I to back in, I'd have to gauge the passenger mirror to that edge of the door, a lot less practical.

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Chi

I couldn't live without my rear camera. I didn't really think I needed one as I didn't have one until I bought my new car in 2015 but I love it! You can see so much better than looking over your shoulder. I'm so much more confident backing out, though I always look first and verify with camera.

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Raye Smith

No Elmer, read it again, the other drivers door next to me has MORE space to open their door because my front end is angled away from their car.

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Elmer J Fudd

If the other car is in headfirst and is on the driver side of your vehicle in butt first, and your front end is angled away, then the butt of your car (and the next however many feet) are closer to the car to your left's front than if you were straight. And how about the car to your right? Click to view

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lily12

Our new Subaru has a siren going off if you're backing up and a car is approaching from either direction. Of course, it has a backup camera too with the lane now marked in yellow which is different from the last Subaru.

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Raye Smith

In your diagram the curb end of the parking spaces is at the bottom, thus the drivers side door of the car has MORE room to swing open. It makes it easier for both the car and myself to open our doors wider before touching the other vehicle.

One thing wrong with your diagram is my truck would be further into the parking space. The rear tires are further in than the front tires so I can go deeper into the space before the tires rest against the curbing. That's one of the reasons that you see most front bumper in parked trucks sticking out into the lane of traffic.

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Brianna Newcomer
I also back on typically at a bit of an angle like Angela, not because I'm making my life easier and trying to be rude, but out of common courtesy for other, so 1. I can get further into the space, not blocking smaller vehicles view, but 2. So I don't door ding anyone getting my baby out of the back seat on the passenger side. And just an FYI, I know how to drive my large vehicle, I back into my garage just fine, with little effort. It's my neighbors that don't back their large vehicles in that should not be driving an SUV, because again they cant back out of their parking space without running into my garage, so maybe they should 1. Back into the space, 2. "Leave their big SUV at home" that they have no business driving, 3. Get a new vehicle that they know how to drive.
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raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio

Those of you who back into parking spaces that have another space behind-- some have mentioned backing in until the wheels are at the curb or the line -- but doesn't that leave your rear crossing into the other space? and if the driver parking behind wants to pull all the way in so that their car isn't dangling out into the drive lane, doesn't that automatically put the cars too close to access the rear of yours? Is that the fault of the driver who is trying to park in a space that you have partly backed into?

This is the problem that I run into frequently at work. Person has backed into the space and the rear of their truck is taking up part of the space behind.

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silvercomet1

I've seen a lot of trucks effectively taking up two parking spaces by backing so far in that they're making it impossible for someone to park in the space behind them. Very frustrating when parking is at a premium. Also seen trucks hanging over and blocking sidewalks, forcing pedestrians off the sidewalk and into the parking lot traffic, which doesn't really make anything safer. It would be great if parking lots could include some truck-sized spaces to help with this, although getting people to use them consistently would be a challenge!



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Raye Smith

Most of the place I park, grocery store, drug store and such have at the back of the parking spaces a curb and then dirt & further back bushes. They are single lines of parking on either side of the lot. There are no other vehicles or pedestrian lanes behind the truck. If there are such things I typically chose the perimeter parking spaces that don't effect that.

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DawnInCal

I rarely notice vehicles of any kind backed into spaces so I paid attention while we were out running errands today. We were at Costco, Home Depot, the grocery stores, a large medical complex and went out to dinner before heading home. All total, I saw four vehicles backed into spaces and all were full size pickups, which is pretty much what I observe anytime I'm out.

It makes me wonder if backing into a space is a regional practice not seen in my area or if most people tend to pull forward into a space when parking.

Now, what really gets my goat is someone with a large full size pickup or SUV pulling a long trailer who takes up two+ spaces when they park due to the combined length of the vehicle/trailer. It's not the two+ spaces that bugs me; it's that they generally insist on parking near the store entrance and taking up two+ spaces with the butt end of their trailer blocking most of the lane between rows of spaces making it impossible for anyone trying to find a space to drive down the lane. These people are being rude and need to use the rarely used spaces at the edges of the parking lot so that they don't cause parking lot jams. Grrrrrrr...

Edit to add that we own a full size 4x4 pickup, but always try to be polite about where and how we park. Hubby is good at backing into tight spaces, but I am a complete and dismal failure especially if any distance is involved.

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colleenoz

I'm careful to ensure that my vehicle is entirely within its own space, but not all drivers are. However, I think this is less to do with whether the vehicle has been backed in or not (as this complaint equally applies to drivers who pull in front first) and more to do with the attitude of the driver.

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watchmelol

What I have observed is that most truck people generally know how to park better in all circumstances. My pet peeve is it's the small hybrid (look at me I am saving the environment) type vehicle owner who seems unable to get the vehicle in between the lines. The smaller the car the more apt they will be straddling the lines.


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Raye Smith

I agree Watch, I would say that 90% of the vehicles I see here parked over their lines a compact cars. I would also guess that as far as the kind of vehicles I see around 40% are pickups, 30% are SUVs and 30% are cars.

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Jasdip

It drives me crazy if someone is parked on an angle in a spot. I often see wheels over the line and it makes it tighter for me to back in. I would never think it was done deliberately as a courtesy.

I see people trying over and over to drive in, or they pull in, it's on an angle and they don't care, they leave it like that.

If mine is on an angle, and I always check, I fix it.

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yeonassky

I've had situations where I've had cars on either side of me on an angle and it's the only parking spot in town and I've had to angle in.

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Brianna Newcomer
When I park at an angle it usually is SLIGHTLY angled, more so just so the rear is a little angled, just so it gives enough room to fully open the rear passenger door to stand up on the standing boards and get my child out without dinging anyone, but I don't usually reverse into spaces that have another space directly behind them... but if there is a curb behind, I reverse my back wheels all the way up to the curb so I don't stick out into the area people drive through. It all really just depends on the space and situation, in the situation on my narrow lot, the courteous and smart thing to do would be to reverse park large vehicles.
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Raye Smith

Jasdip - the tires aren't over the line, they're nearer to the line but not over it so the vehicle is fully in one and only one parking space. Here's more info for parking backwards with pickups/SUV's. The front end is curved and the bumper protrudes less so I have more ability to angle without going into the other space then Elmer's diagram shows.

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