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Luxury Vinyl Floor

Barbara
5 years ago
I plan to do approximately 2000 square feet in Luxury Vinyl. This includes all public spaces in my home, 2 bathrooms, laundry room, living room, kitchen, family room and dining room. I live in Southern California and all windows have been changed out to dual pane and I have window coverings. There are so many brands. How do I choose? I would like the vinyl to look like wood. Any recommendations?

Comments (18)

  • Jenn TheCaLLisComingFromInsideTheHouse
    5 years ago

    I used Shaw Florte LVP in my SoCal loft-style town house in 2016 (we moved to our new home in August 2017) - depending on the area and the home prices, you may want to put LVP in the bath/laundry/kitchen/dining and carpet in the bedrooms and living room. One thing that you want to consider is whether you're in an area where houses are higher end with higher end finishes - otherwise you'll take a hit on resale value if you put in floors that are typical to low-middle end houses.

  • PRO
    Patricia Colwell Consulting
    5 years ago

    The first question is your budget the vinyl is all over the map for price . Go to flooring store and get some help for your budget, and install type.

  • _sophiewheeler
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    You need glue down, not floating. And youlll pay as much for vinyl as you will for wood. But without the bump up in value to the home. Fine, if you are building an entry level home. But if you are building anything else, you’ll take a hit on appraisal. It will end up costing you.

  • Barbara
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    I live in a high end, 3200 square foot house, in Ventura County. We have lived in the house for 30 years and plan to retire in this home. So not really looking at resale more convenience. The new vinyls appear to be more comfortable than tile to stand on and easier to maintain than laminate. Right now we have laminate in the bedrooms and are please with it. We feel if we sell the house laminate and luxury vinyl are easy to replace, whereas wood, tile and stone aren’t. Hope this helps.
  • _sophiewheeler
    5 years ago

    The prep work to lay vinyl on top of tile is not going to be an inconsiderable cost. That will have to be done regardless of floor type chosen though.

    If you can deal with thresholds at all doorways, and in any run longer than 30’, you might be able to do floating. But you need a well respected flooring contractor in to assess the space. They will have their own sources and recommendations for product. The contractor is more important than the actual product. There are a lot of products. There are only a few very in demand good contractors. Find your contractor. He’ll help you find your floor.

  • Jenn TheCaLLisComingFromInsideTheHouse
    5 years ago

    If you're in a higher end home, people will be looking for wood, if you put wood in why would they replace it? Refinish probably, but not rip out good wood. Tile and stone they might decide to replace if it's not to their tastes and there's been the inevitable change in trends.

    How long till you retire, and will you be able to 'age in place' after retirement for many years until possibly needing to move into assisted living?

    I had installed LVP and carpet in our previous home and we installed LVP and carpet in our new home - LVP in laundry/baths/kitchen and dining plus entry out here in the Midwest makes sense for even mid-range priced homes like ours. The 3rd bedroom and family room in the basement we had new carpet put in, both bedrooms and the living room are carpeted as well, for comfort reasons mostly. But if we'd stayed in SoCal and that was where we bought a home comparable to the size we live in presently, we'd need to do wood and tile for the resale value simply because that's what the market has dictated.

  • Pensacola PI
    5 years ago

    To answer your question, Flooret which is a great product at a reasonable price. Factory direct and no middle man. Very easy to work with.

  • _sophiewheeler
    5 years ago

    Just remember that there is no installation warranty provided on self provided materials. Much less internet sourced materials. If the installer provides it, he warrants the installation.

  • TBL from CT
    5 years ago

    Barbara, check out the thread titled Anyone Used Coretec. It's miles long and you might want to skip to the bottom for more recent posts. People seem to love it but I would check the Flooret as well. Be sure to look at the design repeat which flags the floor as vinyl if you see the same 'boards' throughout a room. Some manufacturers have extra long selections which helps avoid that. Consider the rooms and how much will be visible. There are many realistic looking brands with great grain. Lots of it is trendy (rustic saw marks). Much of it is mid toned and darker. I am afraid of the trends and would steer clear of overly wide planks and overly dark and rustic.

    I thought I would go LVT but the cost differential wasn't worth the compromise to me. Basic 2 1/2- 3" prefinished oak can be installed for the same or less in my area. Resale issues are valid, even in mid-range homes and everyone wants wood. I may go for 'solid' stranded bamboo to replace family room and bedroom carpeting. I really don't like the short pieces you get stuck with in modestly priced prefinished wood. For kitchens, I can't understand the wood love. It can't be thoroughly washed which is unacceptable to me. Just me and the husband and we take our shoes off before entry. You would not believe the dirty water after I've washed my tile floor. If I could redo the kitchen I would likely put in modern vinyl in a cool fun pattern. If your kitchen has natural wood cabinets, a wood floor is tough to coordinate. Don't go super dark if it's even-toned. EVERY crumb and piece of lint shows. It's like a black car - only looks good the day it's washed. A good friend has deep regrets with an ebony looking bamboo floor (also requires frequent chip touch ups with a marker!).

    We are fortunate to have so many choices. There is something for everyone. Enjoy shopping!


    Anyone Used Coretec

  • jakkom
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    We installed Mannington Adura LVP in Essex Oak in late 2015. We picked it for several reasons, the biggest being we had a stairway and Mannington was the only company offering one-piece treads.

    After it was installed two other contractors remarked, when told it was vinyl, that they had thought the Mannington was real wood. We do have 1940 red oak flooring in part of the house, finished with oil poly. The oak and the vinyl are separated at right angles by stone-look LVT. They are visually distinct although only inches away from each other.

    It is wise to heed advice to pay attention to your installers. Prep is EVERYTHING, especially in so large a space as you're installing. We picked the flooring store first because we'd used them before and they had both good installers and excellent customer service. Then we picked our flooring from what the store offered.

    If you read through the forum threads regularly, you'll note that the majority of people unhappy with their flooring - regardless of type - have issues actually related to installation mistakes, not the flooring material itself.

  • PRO
    Patricia Colwell Consulting
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I like the Mannington product too.

  • fuzzy wuzzy
    4 years ago

    Snaggy: Amen to that. Why is everyone looking to future value and ignoring current utility?

  • Erin Kipp
    4 years ago

    We had LVP picked out for our second floor until I realized how awful vinyl is for your health....eek! Do some research before you decide on vinyl!! :)

  • wannabath
    4 years ago

    Because your house is the largest investment you usually make.

    It is funny how we declare one type of product is considered a luxury item and the other isn't based solely on opinion. If the product add visual appeal and also adds usefulness why is it considered cheap? Ceramic tiles laid with traditional methods and grout lines should be considered old school but try explaining that to realtor.

  • Jenn TheCaLLisComingFromInsideTheHouse
    4 years ago

    We hadn’t intended to move cross country only about a year after painting and replacing the carpet, flooring, and blinds at our previous house - but all that work did help with the sale. Our new house needed all the same work too (the previous owner had brand new carpet in for only two weeks before moving out but that’s all it took for her dog to pee all over the house again, ruining the pad layer and carpet!) and then some - so there has been a number of tradespeople and their crews coming through since we closed at the end of July through the beginning of October. The materials I chose for the last house I loved a lot - and chose them for the new home albeit with adjustments in the color/pattern.

    Now I just hope we never move again. ;)

  • 4thTimesACharm Reno
    4 years ago

    @WeShipFloors I can't find any customer reviews or installed photos of your SuperCore. I like the idea of no transitions, but the instructions specifically call for it so I'm sure if you offer a warranty that would be voided if they were left off.

  • Pensacola PI
    4 years ago

    Agreed, if it sounds to good to be true... if it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck then by God, it's Daffy Duck.