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mikerno_1micha

September trees of 2017 . Please let's see them)

myermike_1micha
6 years ago

So how do your trees look and how are they doing?

Are you losing any, any already bug infested?

Are they growing nice and healthy!?

Please, let's see your updated pics...Can't wait!

Mike

Comments (79)

  • uncle molewacker z9b Danville CA (E.SF Bay)
    6 years ago

    Wow, some GREAT successes in non-citrus zones - - just WOW.

    Here is an update pic of my Gold Nugget planted in Napa earlier this year,,,, it is still growing strong. The picture was taken 9/2 in 106F sun.


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    6 years ago
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    Love that last shot of the kumquat dnedd1. The leaf arrangement makes them look like large green flowers! Almost all your trees look humongous to me even if they weren't as large as they were last season. Maybe they're starting to outgrow their pots!

    Kelly, I'm surprised those branches didn't make it :( I've read that trees usually sprout lower branches for good reason. Maybe there wasn't enough nutrients to go around to continue the branch growth.

    I haven't repotted my tree since I've bought it so I took a lesson from poncirus and drilled dozens and dozens of holes almost 2" up the pot and underneath it. It dries out much faster now and the profuse blooming started some days after I made the holes. I feel like every citrus pot should have dozens of holes drilled underneath and along the side of the pot, even in 511 mixes lol! Probably not for the states that regularly get 100F temps though :/


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    @bonsai_citrus_and_indoor_gardening, I was asking the same thing not too long ago. We have two Kaffir/Makrut trees which now produce fruit year round. My favorite thing to make with them is Thai green curry paste, which uses the juice, rind and/or leaves. I make a large batch and put it into ice cube trays, freeze and then store in zip lock bags. When the craving for curry hits, we stir fry whatever meat or vegetables we have on hand, add 2 - 3 cubes of frozen curry paste with a can of coconut cream, simmer and then serve over rice. Here is the recipe for the paste: 1 stalk lemongrass 2 Tbsp Coriander Seeds 2 Tbsp Fish Sauce 1 tsp Brown Sugar 4-6 Green Chillies, deseeded (adjust as per to taste) 1 small Onion/Shallot 1-2 large Garlic Cloves 1 tsp Kaffir Lime Zest 1 tbsp Kaffir Lime Juice 1 thumb-size piece Ginger 1 cup Cilantro stems and leaves 1 cup fresh Basil stems and leaves Mix well, using a food processor, blender or by hand. I modify the recipe by amping up the juice & zest and I sometimes add in the leaves. The juice is great in savory asian dishes, but is far too strong a taste for cocktails or desserts. I use the juice with a white fish (see this recipe - https://www.blueapron.com/recipes/seared-cod-with-makrut-lime-butter), as part of Tom Yum soup, or to season and garnish Pad Thai. They are featured in many Thai dishes.
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  • Laura LaRosa (7b)
    6 years ago

    Dave, kvet, Kelly, dnedd, and George, great trees and cuttings! Kvet, those cuttings look great! I now understand how satisfying it is to root a cutting. Dnedd, what on earth are you going to do with that in-ground kumquat come winter?? Kelly, take pics of that lemon tree often so we can see how quickly it grows. I am always amazed at the production of in-ground trees. Dave, your mandarin looks incredible. How many fruit are on it? How old is that tree? Can I trouble you for a pic of the whole tree so I can see its size? My mandarins still have not produced much. Also Dave, how is that massive key lime tree of yours? George, don't you have a huge, in-ground ST? I'd love to see it...;-)

    Susanne, I think Harris has that red grapefruit tree you want. I was looking at their website for the bergamot and noticed it...not that I was looking at any of their other varieties ;-)

  • Susanne Michigan Zone 5/6
    6 years ago

    Love all the beautiful trees and all so successful. i wish Michigan summers would be a bit warmer and longer.

    Laura you are bad LOL. Yup I was going to ask you where you found yours. Harris has ruby red dwarf and thinking about ordering that one.but maybe I should wait till next year and see what survived in my winter care.

    Kvet love the pot with the holes. For colder climates much better I'm sure.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    6 years ago

    Kvet my tree definitely could have used more holes, even in 511. I've realized for me my trees do best in ground. It doesn't matter what I do in pots, my greenery all suffers. In ground it flourishes. Well, my grapefruit hasn't grown up much, I'll post a pic soon.

    Love seeing all your trees. I'll post pics of my lime and lemon in ground. I bought them in 2016 and was adamant that they live and thrive, that's how i found this forum.

  • Laura LaRosa (7b)
    6 years ago

    Susanne, my tree I think is very similar to the ruby red - it's a ray ruby. I wonder if it is actually the same tree renamed. I got it about a year ago at a local nursery. It is from Record Buck farms, but is one of their grafted trees, which are quite tall. I suspect that mine was at least 3 years old when I bought it. When that tree bloomed in my sunroom last winter, the scent was INCREDIBLE! I know...I'm egging you on...;-)

  • Susanne Michigan Zone 5/6
    6 years ago

    hehe, Not much more needed to make me fall ;)

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    6 years ago
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    Thank you Laura and Susanne! I've continued to drill extra holes in most of my other temporary containers. If I can't make a 511 mix for them, the least I can do is drill 50 or so holes instead.

    Kelly I'm not surprised they would do better in ground! At zone 10, keeping them maintained in a container is probably too difficult especially if your area doesn't have that constant tropical/sub-tropical humidity. In Taiwan, everyone loves having plants in front of their homes. They're all grown in containers yet look all perky and healthy! A few seconds outdoors will make you sweat buckets. That extreme humidity does wonders for container growing

  • poncirusguy6b452xx
    6 years ago

    All your pictures look wonderful. the trees look so healthy..

    Very little change on my farm. I have started construction of my greenhouse. and I have transplanted my first seed grown Meiwa kumquat tree from its bottomless gallon to a 4.5 gallon bucket.

    These seeds broke soil around 1-1-17 and set out its first true leaves around 2-1-17.

    The 2 secret ingredients for fast growth are.

    1) Light, light, light, and even more light. 16 hours per day.

    2) Feed, feed, feed and then feed again.

    Steve

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    6 years ago

    My husband supported my citrus habit at first but we're running out of places for trees. Im tempted to buy one every time I go to the home improvement stores. Plus I have 3 nurseries within 5 miles of where I live and two more by my work.

    Here they are now.

    Grapefruit - rio red. Doesn't look like it's grown much but it has. Just not up.


    My bearrs lime that's been taken over by clm.

    My Lisbon lemon that has grown so much!

    The Meyer that was already here when we moved in.

    My new improved Meyer

  • sunshine (zone 6a, Ontario,Canada)
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    So many beautiful and healthy trees, everyone, your hard work shows in the pictures! Here are my trees this month. My improved Meyer lemon ( Johnmerr, my family voted for the fruits to stay on the tree, so I gave the tree big doze of fertilizer and it dropped all the flowers :) )

    My Bearss lime:

    Laura the Meiwa kumquat:

    My lemon-orange tree (has not fruited yet, little wind stressed) :

    My Friendship tree (still only Clementine grafted on it-upper right corner , want to grow it stronger, so I can graft more varieties on it from friends ;) ). It went crazy this season:

    The Clementine I grafted in February on sweet orange rootstock:

    My little tangerine seedling:

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    6 years ago
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    That's a huge Meyer Kelly! How have you not been tempted into rooting hundreds of Meyer cuttings by now?!

    sunshine, that tangerine seedling is probably my favorite out of all those photos. It's adorable and has amazing growth. So many leaves/nodes at such a short height, it looks wonderful!

    A few more flower buds have bloomed on my Meyer and it looks so pretty but I noticed some leaves looking a bit nutrient deficient :(


    Is fertilizer supposed to be temporarily bumped up during flowering periods? This is the first time the top leaves look like that. I have a feeling this tree will be more troublesome than I thought it would be

  • sunshine (zone 6a, Ontario,Canada)
    6 years ago

    My leaves on some trees are on the light side as well, too much rain washed the nutrients out. Waiting for the soil to dry little bit and feed them again.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    6 years ago

    Kvetch, would fish emulsion help? My new meyer is on the light side right now too.

    Probably a question for another thread but, I didn't know I could root meyer cuttings? I thought they had to be grafted? I have no idea about these things...

  • Dave in NoVA • N. Virginia • zone 7A
    6 years ago

    Laura LaRosa (7b), here's a bad photo of my Satsuma tree. I have no idea how many fruit are on it. Don't really have the time to count them. I've been eating a few already.


  • Laura LaRosa (7b)
    6 years ago

    Wow, Dave that is a great looking tree. I love the shape of it, not to mention how productive it is. I hope mine will look like that someday. Thanks for posting. What about your key lime? I remember trying to count all the limes in a pic you posted a while back and could not!

  • Susanne Michigan Zone 5/6
    6 years ago

    OMG, what a beautiful tree with all that fruits. Just hope my satsuma will have at least half as many fruits on there

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    6 years ago

    I don't know how you all keep your trees so beautiful and productive in pots but they are lovely!

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    6 years ago
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    I had the same thought as Laura, I love the way the tree is shaped and branched out. Did it grow that way with a bit of pruning Dave?

    sunshine, I'm planning to do the same too. Probably the only thing that I can do for it!

    Yes Kelly, all of the photos I posted that were stick skinny are Meyer cuttings! It's amazing how easily they rooted, it's supposed to be one of the easier ones to root too.


    One of my Meyer cuttings bloomed again

  • Dave in NoVA • N. Virginia • zone 7A
    6 years ago

    Here was the key lime. Photo from last year. Not quite as many fruit this year.

  • sunshine (zone 6a, Ontario,Canada)
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Kelly, when I started growing my citrus trees, I did some marathon readings on care for citrus trees on this forum, learned so many things from the wonderful people on this forum and also experimented with my own trees and seedlings, made observations, had some disappointments and all that made me more confident in growing citrus trees. You do the same ;))!

    Wow Dave, look at your amazing fruit load :) !

  • Amy (montreal, canada)
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Yes Kelly but beware... The more you read the more temptations you need to fight. At the beginning of this summer, I was casually browsing this forum to learn some tips to grow my new owari satsuma. Now, hummm.. let's just say that I have a few more trees...

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    6 years ago

    I have been meaning to trim that Meyer for a while.. so trying to get cuttings to grow would be fun. My husband will think I'm crazy but that's ok. They won't all work! Thank you for the advice and suggestions. I do appreciate it.

  • Dave in NoVA • N. Virginia • zone 7A
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Here's another closeup of Satsuma fruit.

    Getting better.

  • Amy (montreal, canada)
    6 years ago

    Wow gorgeous tree and fruits!

  • Nancy
    6 years ago

    My dwarf trees grown in basement greenhouse. T5HO and LED lights.

    Kishu mandarin

    Satsuma mandarin

    Dancy mandarin
    Meyer lemon

    Tango mandarin

    The whole operation- plumeria, avocado included.

    Thanks for looking!

    Nancy







  • jaydub83
    6 years ago

    My 2 meyer lemon cuttings that i rooted, pic is from last september:


    Here they are almost exactly one year later:


    I let both hold one fruit a piece, which i am anxiously awaiting

    And a pic of my key lime tree grown from seed, 3rd summer:

    No blooms yet, hope to see some by next summer, or i may have to prop an axe next to it...

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    6 years ago
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    Jaydub, your cuttings (now trees!) give me good vibes about my cuttings. If my sticks can look like that by next year, I'll be over the moon! The lime looks so nice, maybe a heavy pruning will give it that push to start flowering :D

    Nancy, nice indoor setup mixing the two lights. Did you line your walls to reflect back the light? Is the LED you're using is the green 36W TaoTronics? I've actually bookmarked that 36W green bulb to purchase but I haven't figured out where I'll be setting up. How do you like the bulb? The angle looks like it only exudes enough light for about 1 larger plant. I thought one would be enough when I only had my Meyer tree but now I've gone and rooted 5 cuttings and 3 seedlings! Maybe they will be small enough to sit next to my tree under one bulb?

    ^ Here's a second lemon sprouted from seed.

    ^ I sprouted 2 grapefruit seeds in a small ziplock bag and they were pushing out so strongly, the bag looked like it would explode. One of the seeds was bulged on both sides and sprouted 2 stalks, definitely a polyembryonic seed! They grew so vigorously that one of the stalks on the polyembryonic seed broke though :(

  • Nancy
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Kvetch your seedlings are adorable. 5 cuttings and 3 seedlings is quite a success :-) Yes the walls, floor and ceiling in my greenhouse are all covered with heavy silver tarps- works nicely to reflect.

    And you're right- the LED's are the Taotronics 36W. I have one light about 12-16" above each citrus tree and they stand next to the T5HO lights and get rotated. It works great. I wondered if the 36W would do the job but they work marvelously. You could probably get 4-5 seedlings under one light, and maybe 3-4 cuttings under another, but it would depend on how big your pots are. I'd put a 3-7 gallon size pot under one LED, the tree not larger than about 4 feet, to give you an idea of how many small pots you could put under one light.

    But the cuttings and seedlings being so tender might do OK next to a tree depending on how tall the tree is. I'd give it a try and see how it goes.

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    6 years ago

    Thank you Nancy! All I did was follow the most important tip everyone here offers "do not overwater." And it certainly worked when I followed correctly lol! Referencing the gallon sizes you would put under one light helps me a lot with visualizing the setup. I will try to get a bulb early and see how it goes. I had passed off on the TaoTronics the first time I saw it but a reviewer for a different bulb was very thorough and tested many bulbs with a light meter. And apparently this 36W one had the greatest LED par received by the plant for its wattage and price too. Thank you again for your advice on the bulb's range and distance!

    A second cutting to finally send out shoots.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    6 years ago

    I just looked up how to root the cuttings. Do you guys wrap plastic around the pots and use root hormone? I can't put cuttings in the house until early Feb when I have my whole seed setup so ideally I'd be doing it outside. I have a few protected areas. Just looking for some tips on how you guys do it. I can google forever but you've actually done it!

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    6 years ago

    Yep that's about what I did for my Meyer cuttings. I got results leaving a few leaves at the top, rolling the bottom end lightly in root hormone powder, stuck it into a pot of loose peat, watered pot then put a ziplock bag over the pot and sealed it with string or rubber band. If you use a non-breathable container like plastic, make a small cut on the top of the bag to release excess moisture and put it under shade.

    Here's a couple of fig cuttings in the beginning process. Except I soaked these in water first until I saw root nubs..then potted. But only because I felt the fig branches were so thick. Some people don't use rooting powder and use honey+cinnamon to root with success. Test one out and let us know how it goes!


  • jaydub83
    6 years ago

    Kelly, look into air layering. That may be more practical for you.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I just watched a video on air layering. They make it look so easy. But the written instructions say to wait a year for it to root. Thats a long time! I think I'll try the cutting first just to see if I can.

  • Laura LaRosa (7b)
    6 years ago

    Jay, the growth you have had on your cuttings and that seed grown key lime is amazing. They all look spectacular. I cannot imagine that the key lime will not bloom for you soon. It looks huge. I have a couple of key lime seedlings that I planted last fall that look absolutely pathetic. I wonder if they are just weak genetic stock because they are just not thriving and kind of pale. Anyways, great job! All of you guys really inspire me. Seeing everyone's success stories is wonderful!

  • PacNorWreck
    6 years ago

    Here's all of my citrus:

    Starting w/ my Yuzu. Had to chop back the new growth by about half so it would fill out a bit. If I didn't prune it during the summer it would grow 3' or more per year. It didn't flower this year, which I attribute to it having produced 5 fruit as a young tree last year and being a bit tired, but it's obviously quite healthy so I'm hoping for fruit next year.

    Next up is my Rangpur. It's really recovered quite well from the sunburn and shock it suffered this Spring. When I first brought it out, it dropped nearly all of its leaves and the trunk got scorched pretty badly. Now it's happy as a clam and producing lots of little limes.

    My lakeland limequat form Harris is starting to fill back out and flush with growth, so it's nice to see it recovering from being shipped during a scorching July 4th week. Hopefully it will be a robust little shrub by next summer. Does anyone with limequat experience think I should pluck the 15 or so baby fruit it set or will it self-thin to what it can carry while still growing?

    My Marrakech limetta is still showing a lot of shock from transplant and from being sent to the cool, dreary NW from California where it grew up. I'd love to see a flush of new growth before it comes in for the winter, but as long as it survives to next Spring I'm sure it'll be fine. It is strange to me that the newer growth is looking so deficient - it's got brand new soil and has been fed more than enough. Hopefully it's just working on root development for now.

    Lastly - and most exciting! - my new Santa Teresa lemon arrived today from FWG. The tree is overall quite robust and healthy looking, with the huge leaves the variety is known for. The new growth is quite distorted though. Should I neem the tree just to be safe in case it brought some leaf miners or aphids North with it from California?

    Here's what the distorted new growth looks like on top. Thoughts as to the likely culprit and what I should do about it?

  • Susanne Michigan Zone 5/6
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Love your new ST. I don't see damage from LM and not sure about aphids? If you look it over real good you should see them I think?

  • jaydub83
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Laura, thanks. Yeah it needs to bloom soon, its 4x4 foot already and im running out of space in the winter lol. But its fun to experiment.

    Kelly, I recently air layered a big branch and got nice roots within 3 weeks:

    Perhaps some varieties take a year, but I think most would take less than a few months. This is the first time I tried air layering, and it seems much easier than cuttings which are hit or miss.

  • Susanne Michigan Zone 5/6
    6 years ago

    Jay is there a good time for air layering citrus or doesn't it matter?

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I'd like to give it a go. The video I watched makes it seem so easy. I can't imagine there's anything truly easy about it.

  • sunshine (zone 6a, Ontario,Canada)
    6 years ago

    Preferably warm weather, if your citrus or other tree is outdoors in colder climates.

  • sunshine (zone 6a, Ontario,Canada)
    6 years ago

    I have done indoors air layering in winter time, took longer and had to "warm" up the air layer with a light directed at it.

  • evdesert 9B Indio, CA
    6 years ago

    Hello fellow citrus forumers...everyone's trees are looking really nice. We had a monsoonal thunderstorm yesterday afternoon, it was the first rain my yard had seen in months. Here's a pic from this morning of my younger key lime tree that decided over the past week and a half that it's fruits were ripe enough and pretty much dropped most of them. Trovita to the left and Cara Cara to the right. Key lime pie anyone!?!?!?


    Key lime tree on C35 · More Info

    Evan

  • Kelley_GA8a
    6 years ago

    We are ready for Irma!

  • myermike_1micha
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I must say...BRAVO to everyone posting such nice pics! Great work and thank you.

    Here is just a couple of mine..


    Laura, you can appreciate this one! It.s my grapefruit that fell off my roof and had its head chopped off. It grew taller and filled out.

    What's weird about this Kaffir lime is that it's growing what do they call it? Esqualler shaped? From side to side . It's kind of cool

  • poncirusguy6b452xx
    6 years ago

    Lovely pictures everyone. September is almost over so keep them coming.

    Tukushu is too tall to fit vertically.

    Seed Grown Meiwa Kumquat#3 SGMK3

    4 out of 5 of my seed grown Meiwa Kumquat trees are no in 4.5 gallon buckets'

    Steve

  • Amy (montreal, canada)
    6 years ago

    Here is my seed grown kaffir lime:

    My finger lime. This little fellow is very thorny

    My new hirado butan pummelo tree

  • PKG
    6 years ago

    Looking good everyone. Here are a couple of mine.

    September 2017 pics · More Info
    Cara Cara


    September 2017 pics · More Info

    Washington Navel which had a main branch broken back when it went into the ground in 2010. It kind of sprawled out like a bush.

    September 2017 pics · More Info

    September 2017 pics · More Info

    Tarocco which has been struggling a bit this summer.

    September 2017 pics · More Info

    The leaves get curled up and droopy when it's hot and irrigated and has not put on a summer flush as of yet. Might be because it's loaded with fruit and the tree is stressed by it, not sure. Have also had a lot of grasshoppers that I've pulled off it recently.

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    6 years ago

    You call that stressed? You should see my tree's puny 3 branches, they look like weeds compared to your huge bushes!

  • Susanne Michigan Zone 5/6
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    update on my limone rosso seedlings, growing really well so far. seeded six and out of six got nine seedlings, one of them little stems fused together and I doubt they would be separated.

    last days of summer utilizing warmth of the driveway

    Laura and Rosan in their new pot
    mineola new growth
    cara growing more

    new growth on ST feminello