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Habanado Peppers

dbarron
4 years ago
last modified: 4 years ago

I am growing this year, the habanado, which is suppossedly a heatless habanero. I started it later than I should have, we had cloudy cool wet weather, etc.

In short, the pepper has it's first buds, which are still small. It's not that big a plant (it's potted in a quart pot, and will move to gallon soon, as root protrude from drainage holes). It's continued to be a very rainy summer, so I didn't want to pot up to the next size until it showed it needed it.

Being in the south, I'm not used to worrying about not having enough time for something to mature to harvest. But, in this case, if I do move them inside when it starts to cool (whenever that is), will the peppers likely drop or continue to ripen?

Best I can offer them is a bay window south exposure.

Comments (12)

  • dbarron
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    Thanks Brennan, I hadn't grown habaneros ever, and it's been at least twenty years since I grew jalapenos. In neither case did timing and weather present this many challenges, then of course, those were planted in the ground rather than in pots too.

  • esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    I would keep them outside until your night time temps start dipping below 50. a couple forays down to high 40's is OK, but I am thinking more like three or four nights in a row.


    also, if that plant is a foot tall or taller, I would move it straight to a full size pot (at least 3 gallons, preferably 5 gallons) right off. No need to restrict it all and the continued transplantings only risk "transplant shock" which could slow growth rate for a week or so afterwards.

  • dbarron
    Original Author
    4 years ago

    Actually, I'm pretty careful and skillful with potting up before the plant becomes root-bound. I don't see any transplant shock with simple potting up and minimal to no soil disturbance. I think that's better than having three gallons of soaking wet media for many extra days after rains, because plant isn't big enough to have extended roots through it yet. Thank you for the well-intentioned advise though.

  • esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
    4 years ago

    Sure thing. SOunds like you have a handle on it.

  • dbarron
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Ok, just to offer an update (and ask a question). My pepper put on about 10 fruits this spring, which are turning orange now.

    For best flavor, is orange good enough, or should I let them progress to red?

    I was thinking the sooner I picked, the better change of some more mature peppers before frost.

    Due to somewhat lackluster (taking 2 years to get a yield) performance, not sure I'll carry it through the winter again.

  • esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
    3 years ago

    That kind of depends on what constitutes ripe with your Habanados. Some Habaneros will go to red when fully ripe. Traditional orange Habaneros are fully ripe when they are orange. I have grown both. I would probably leave them on the plant for a while to see if they start to transition to red or not.

    But, in reality, they will likely be plenty tastey as soon as they go orange. Maybe pick some now and let the others go a while. You should have plenty of growing time left for a second harvest before your season ends anyway.

    dbarron thanked esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
  • dbarron
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    I dunno this habanado is slow...these were set in May and are only now turning orange. And it's not for lack of hot, though we've stayed under 100, it's been consistently in the 90s.

    Oh hey, I went to Baker Creek Seeds and found that tangerine IS it's ripe color...so I guess that answers that...after two years I didn't remember.

    And that it's actually habanada not habanado (lol)...wow, senior moments all over.

  • lucky_cloud
    3 years ago

    Yes, orange is their ripe color. They do take a while to ripen but I have found them to be very vigorous and abundant in fruiting. I've picked them at very orange and also at pale orange, they are still good that way as well.

    dbarron thanked lucky_cloud
  • dbarron
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    I look forward to my first taste of a heatless (maybe) habanada. I'm quite curious what the flavor is with no extreme heat to obscure it.

  • lucky_cloud
    3 years ago

    It is amazing. The flavor is fantastic. I made a sauce from them and gave to friends...everyone texted me about how delicious it was.

  • dbarron
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Well I picked one and roasted it on stove top today. There's a tiny bit of heat (but much less than a jalapeno) and there's a weird taste almost reminiscent of pine, but not quite. The flavor says intense heat (which isn't there)...it's a little disconcerting, but not bad.

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