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How much does a bathroom renovation cost?

Sthefany Linares
5 years ago

I want to do a full bathroom remodel next year and want to start saving up, but I'm wondering how much you should I save before spending money by calling a contractor.

Comments (33)

  • _sophiewheeler
    5 years ago

    A hall bathroom, 10-20K. A Master, 40-60K. A Houzz inspiration level Master can be 100K+. Depends on how many plumbing pieces, and the level of finishes. You can do a plastic tub shower with plastic surround and a vinyl floor, or you can do a separate tub and shower with marble clad walls and 10 body jets. Your wants control the price.

  • handymac
    5 years ago

    No way to answer your question. Because the size of the room, fixtures, wall treatment, flooring, electrical fixtures, amenities, and area(for labor rates) are not known.

    Research local building code rules as you might need a permit. Very often modifications which are cosmetic(paint/tile/flooring) can be done without a permit. But if plumbing or electrical has to be modified/moved, permit are usually necessary for those functions.

    Start by looking for the fixtures you like---tub, tub shower combo, shower, vanity, sink, towel bars/soap dishes/etc., and toilet. Flooring you like, paint/wallpaper/tile/etc.

    Are you going to move walls? Might need blueprints for that. That is usually an architect's job.

    You can even research on You Tube or Google for times it usually takes for a job like installing a vanity/sink, bathtub, shower(insert or tiled) stall and so on.

    Those are just estimates, as most contractors have companies and brand of materials they use. If you have a high/low amount for each different material/fixture, that makes estimating easier for a contractor. And their labor rates may change in a year, so any figure given now is just an estimate.

    That allows you to come up with a total estimate for saving. Just add 10% to 20% to your final figure for cost increases in that year.

    Sthefany Linares thanked handymac
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  • palimpsest
    5 years ago

    I have done 5x7 near guts with Daltile, glass shower doors(1) curtains (2) , Kraftmaid vanities (2) for around $7000, (three different bathrooms around this price each, ten years ago); one with Daltile, American Standard, and Toto with a Kraftmaid vanity for around $16,000, with a guy who was pricier than some because it turned around in ten days and was without a toilet only overnight once; and upwards of $25,000 each still with inexpensive tile but a Runtal Towel Warmer and custom vanities in each and Kohler fixtures. One has a Geberit/Toto wall hung toilet, (two bathrooms going on right now). Even the most expensive of these used sturdy but inexpensive materials. The $20K ones would be more except the contractor is doing both as side jobs and they are taking an extremely long time. 1 took a year.

    I know contractors who can do a gut 5x7-6x8 bathroom for around $10K, I know contractors who couldn't do it for less than $25. Lots of variables. (I even know contractors who could do a bathroom from the ground up for a couple thousand dollars. The house I moved into had one of those. It was not good.)

    Sthefany Linares thanked palimpsest
  • geoffrey_b
    5 years ago

    7 years ago I remodeled our downstairs bath - complete gut - new shower (no tub) / sliding glass shower door / vanity / toilet / tile / Grohe fixtures / light fixtures / new door - it was about $9,000 for materials only.

  • thatsmuchbetter
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Completely subjective to your home, locale n desired result which lands you smack dab in between 10-100K

  • dchall_san_antonio
    5 years ago

    Location, location, location.

    We gutted three bathrooms (moved walls around, toilets, tile around tub and shower and on floors, sinks and counter tops, lighting, cabinets/vanity, mirrors and paint). The same contractor replaced every door in the house, installed two picture windows, and installed a new double door to the outside. Total cost was $60,000.

  • FeatherBee
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I'm in the Midwest. 90s builder grade home, nothing fancy but good part of town, home is worth around 300k. My master bathroom remodel cost around 11k using a contractor. I did not replace the tub though - it wasn't in the budget.

    Main things we did:

    -rip out carpet (including in the closet)

    -put down tile

    -rip out shower

    -install new tile shower using a wedi system underneath (that was $800)

    -glass shower door ($1200)

    -install can lights (remove old lights)

    -new cherry inset vanity (made by a friend $1050)

    -white quartz counter top (remnant piece $1000)

    -new toilet

    -purchased all the tile myself

    -new Paint

    -new Trim

    -new door

    - new sink faucets, shower head etc,

    I'm probably forgetting a couple things, but you get the picture. It's not impossible to get a new bathroom without breaking the bank. But I will say that I did a lot of work finding reasonable prices. I consider myself somewhat of a tightwad though and enjoy the adventure of hunting for good deals.


    Sthefany Linares thanked FeatherBee
  • thatsmuchbetter
    5 years ago

    "I'm probably forgetting a couple things"

    I love the houzz...


  • palimpsest
    5 years ago

    Just to point out the variability and why it's hard to answer such a question, without more details:

    The vanity and top that FeatherBee installed for $2000+ would cost around $5000 in my area.

  • thatsmuchbetter
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    They forgot to mention many details, and while it looks like a neat bathroom, further perpetuates the confusion, to actual costs that cant be measured here in the typingbox anyways.

  • roarah
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I am in a high cost of living area and sadly my 3x5 shower (construction, waterproofing, tile, and fixtures, excluding plumber fees) cost what featherbee's whole room came to. Mine was an addition with plumbing added to a side of the house where none preexisted, which adds a lot more to my costs.

    edited to add costs. I dug out my contract and shopping spread sheet. My plumbing and excavator fees were also around 11 k. My glass frameless was 2500. Heated tile floor install plus materials 2k. Vanity was a DIY dresser conversion took DH and I two weeks of nights to make and sink and faucet were less than$200. Toilet was $300. we painted the new dry wall, ceilings and trim ourselves with 12 foot high ceilings and three Windows it took a full two weekends but saved us over 2k in painter's cost. The framing, siding, roof, Windows, insulation, drywall and door to the new room was $23000. New walkway, driveway and garden repair due to new added plumbing were 10k. Lighting, towel heating room radiator, and electrician add another 3k. Storage wardrobes we assembled 2k. So all in all to add a master where none existed was around 65k

    The contractor I used was not my highest nor lowest quote. If it was a redo with no plumbing relocated I think mine would have been between 25,00O to 35k with the finishes I chose and labor. I chose less expensive tile at less than 12 per square foot and not saphire blue glass but thicker regular glass. My bath is certainly not as nice as a featured houzz bath for sure but above builder grade.

    get three contractors to bid for the job to get true cost advice for your house and location.

    Sthefany Linares thanked roarah
  • FeatherBee
    5 years ago

    I used a licensed contractor who is very reasonable (Same guy who installed my hardwood floors). I'm not forgetting much bc I know I only had so much money and didn't go over 11k. I didn't have to move pipes or anything major.


    Also ProSource quoted me close to $3500 for vanity and Cambria Quartz. And this was one of their cheaper cabinet brands. I instead used a local cabinet maker who I went to school with and searched high and low for remnant Quartz, saving over $600 as quoted by Cambria.


    My house isn't high end obviously but I just wanted to show that you don't always need 40k for a master bathroom.


  • FeatherBee
    5 years ago

    Thatsmuchbetter - you seem correct when you said between 10-100k :)

    I agree there's a lot more to it. Again, I'm just giving my example.


  • thatsmuchbetter
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    10k being sophies hallway, OK so you agree alot more $ to it, good :):)

    the most common way people on the interweb mislead in semi DIY projects is they dont compute their time, as in the 100 hrs you put into it that are not $60 skilled tradesman hours in your contractors pocket.. nobody even keeps a ledger on that as they save money and get an 11k bathroom and i will say it looks nice(pat yourself on the back) was it permitted? inspected?

    "Bought all the tile myself" right there is 10 hrs of shopping selecting driving deciding debating buying and procuring onsite and the liability tied to it ...

    Hope that is more to my point. 11k = how much really? wedi alone is $800 and the time and effort to make A list and order/procure. I fear your sharing bit parts of a bigger reality is all :) :)

  • thatsmuchbetter
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    very rare on the Houzz for folks to share an honest reply like you have done.

    Thanks for the more accurate reveal. :):) 20k it is then for a mid grade basement bath from someone who did a lot of it themselves hired out the hard parts didnt inquire about permit in a 2 week dash. And you have a friend in the cabinet/counter buisness where you saved good $$ shall we say thats more accurate . Again it looks nice and we see your proud and excited to share :):)

  • FeatherBee
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Fair enough :)

  • H B
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Here is a suggestion. It will never cost less than the materials required....and depending on what those choices are, materials can cost a lot. All of the items needed in a remodel can be found at discount stores as well as Ann Sacks, etc. Bathtub? Shower pan/floor? glass doors? Vanity? countertop, backsplashes, sinks, fixtures, mirrors, lighting, tiles, flooring, underfloor heating, towel warmer, fans, shower fixtures -- rainshower, handhelds, wall jets... toilet... google around and see what you like and add it up. Then, depending on how much you can accomplish yourself....labor, contracting, permits, etc. it just goes up from there. If walls are moving, plumbing etc. that will add to the costs.

  • palimpsest
    5 years ago

    I have $8000 in vanity, Runtal towel radiator and dimmable LED linear bathroom lighting alone, and it looks like a very modest bathroom. It is a modest bathroom, it just used, or it required a couple high ticket items. (The vanity is 47" x 18" built in, has a niche for the toilet paper and wastebasket, and three different sized drawers that pull out to different lengths over, and next to the toilet. It had to be highly custom to fit the space and be functional.

    The cheapest bathroom is going to be one that is large enough to take a standard bathtub or three wall tub/shower enclosure, a standard off the rack vanity. and a regular toilet, no extra tile where not needed, standard lighting and ventilation. There's not a thing wrong with doing that, and in many cases you should be able to do something like that with decent quality for about $10,000. Smaller and it can get much more expensive, and larger it can bet much more expensive.

  • bry911
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    @ thatsmuchbetter - I really don't understand some of your "costs". Driving around selecting tile is not an avoidable cost. It isn't like you wouldn't have to do that if you hired a contractor. Also if you are trying to claim it is an opportunity cost then you have to consider your likely alternatives (wages), not the contractor's, if you are driving around selecting tile instead of watching television, then there is no additional cost for that.

    A DIY project may not be very informative to people who don't intend to DIY a project, however, it certainly doesn't have an increased relevant cost because you didn't calculate what you would have paid a contractor... Someone who is using that for information purposes should add in what a contractor will cost.

    I rarely answer these questions because I am good at bathroom remodels I will probably do one this December, if I have time, and the total cost for a full gut remodel of a 900 ft² bathroom will be between $3,200 and $3,800. If I have to hire someone to do it for me I am probably going to end up paying between $8,200 and $8,800 in total. Before anyone starts claiming those numbers are unrealistic, this will the 7th bathroom I have done in 10 years. I can assure you if anything those numbers are a bit on the high side.

    I know this because I already have all the materials other than paint, thinset, grout, plus a few incidental things I might find when I get down to the studs. It will be permitted and inspected as all my projects are.

    I don't remodel like most people do. I am a real bargain hunter, I purchased the tile for this bathroom about 2 years before I bought the house at a large tile retailers "yard sale." I purchased the shower and sink faucets about 9 months ago, the toilet about 2 years ago (all fixtures from Ferguson), the lighting was bought about 18 months ago. I buy things that I really like when I see them at a deep discount and design the room around those things rather than vice versa. I use high quality materials but try to find them on closeout type deals. I would guess that I pay 25% of retail for tile, and about 30% to 50% of retail for other things, (no discount on building materials, of course).

    Now honestly this means I have more waste and I do have a significant amount of money invested in materials for projects that I am not even thinking about yet. So I guess you could figure time value of money increases my cost by 10% to 20%. But in reality I spend a lot less doing it this way.

    ETA: There are smarter ways to do a bathroom remodel, you do pay a premium when time is of the essence. So taking a year rather than a month to purchase materials will give you some net savings, there will be a little more risk and some ancillary costs but the savings can be significant. However, I am not advising you to do this, just something to think about.

  • thatsmuchbetter
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Bry you drive around chasing tile or do I cause im charing you for that time and hand holding and then when I purchase and approve it I will also take on that liability in the event you turn into a real peach and the whole deal will be permitted and documented properly..

    You can DIY all you want but lets not mislead with uncalculated figures OK???

    simply scroll all the way to the top The OPs question says absolutley squat about DIY or partial DIY shennanigans. And featherbee themselves shared the truth already after being prodded a wee bit and for everyones benefit (before folks start tearing the home apart and find themselves in A moment.)

    purchasing everything, you take on the liability of every wrrty. And the smart contractor will run away from your potentially time consuming mess of a project.

    Oh Im sorry i got the wrong one it should be left not right. .Oh i dont know where the box and literature is I lost it. Oh i got it on closeout and we cant find that missing part. Its a time sink for a smart contractor. But as evidenced by featherbee its not always a mess...

    Im gonna DIY some brake lines on my truck today and when I lose brake power on the freeway its on me. Ill get sued for killing someone because I made my brakes fail while saving a few cha- chings. .edit PC

  • FeatherBee
    5 years ago

    I think me and bry911 are good examples that nice bathrooms do exist without breaking the bank. Everyone wants to throw out these big #s all the time, and I get it, that's what some people pay. But I'm telling you there are a lot of middle class people doing remodels on a budget that don't cost 30k +

    I too bought some items several months in advance. But I calculated everything when I came up with my 11k overall cost. Bry is right when he says people are going to spend time picking out materials either way. I'm sure I spent more time, but that's only because I change my mind every 8 seconds and I'm looking for good deals.

    We've all seen people pay top dollar and have issues too, so there are no guarantees that just because you spend more you get better quality.

    My suggestion to the OP and anyone considering a bathroom remodel is first look at what you can afford and start to determine a budget. Then look at your home value. I wouldn't put a 30k bathroom in a 200k home. But hey, if you can afford it and want to - go for it. Next, envision your space complete/remodeled and start picking out the big ticket items. This should help form your budget. Then get multiple bids from contractors. Then add 20% for MISC.

  • thatsmuchbetter
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Bry911 by the end of a 2 week project on average I may spend a good 10 hrs hand holding you while you fumble around in diy land, ask a zillion questions that take my precious time so im gonna plan for that in a semi DIY project YEP. .. But then you made it clear you arent in the trades your an accountant gone weekender and maybe youre good at it who knows, but we know thats rare as evidenced here by all the travesties in reno's on these forums. So kudos to featherbee for being good at it..

    Jumping to defraud folks now Huh? how about selling a home without permitted bathrooms.....defrauding... Cmon with your professed profession I think understand wages are the only thing contactors paying taxes on. But I may be charging wages for the hours of time I spend driving to procure building materials for you at which I pay taxes at the point of sale and I may get my standard 10% markup on that or I may add it to the job if you choose to purchase and procure all that, but were gonna need to spend a few hrs of my time in yep wages approving every material I USE and well thats more time ...... Heck I could spend an hour explaining SPF2 KDHT lumber vs KDAT and then have you call me from the lumber yard or show up with abunch of warped lumber. Theres a few hrs that effect my NAME, quality and ability to keep workflow .

    Its funny how people here feel threatened when DIY comes into play and finding deals, But its also the first place people come to complain when it goes horribly wrong. Featherbee here is a good acception sans permits . I think youve gotten my point and i know you are a good one at arguing with pros here over the years. remember Im not posting here as a pro.

    In regards to wrrty's and defects. You are off on that mark. You may wish someday you had your mechanical contractor buy, procure and install the boiler while also taking all the liability off your "uninsured to do that work plate".. Someday when an isurance claim gets declined..

  • bry911
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Bathroom remodels are expensive and informing consumers of that is fine. I have no problem with you pointing out that some of these budgets are unrealistic.

    I also have no problem with someone noting that DIY projects have hidden costs that are not easily translated into dollars, or that DIY projects rarely have the same quality as a professional job.

    As a DIY'er I agree that it is a bad project to DIY. I don't agree that all materials should be purchased at the time through the contractor because I can demonstrate how even the marginal labor doesn't approach the savings.

    But you can't just go in and arbitrarily add costs that don't exist until you make a DIY job more costly than a contracted job. I have no trouble with most of what you posted other than the fact that you played the imaginary numbers game.

  • palimpsest
    5 years ago

    I don't know how the averages are calculated but I have always felt those numbers to be high. I think they may be skewed by reporting and also by expensive outliers, I don't know. And I think a lot of projects may really not be true gut remodels and lots of projects may never touch most of the drywall, the subfloor, the existing electrical, or plumbing to any great extent--they are essentially heavy cosmetic remodels.

    And how is the data tabulated? In another thread I mentioned a kitchen I know of cost $300,000. How many of those does it take to skew data? I know a realtor who makes $10M in a good year and a couple who make $1M. How much do those few individuals skew the data compared to all many realtors in the same city making $50K?

    In my somewhat limited experience the people I know have tended to come in under the supposed averages and I live in a relatively HCOLA area...


  • thatsmuchbetter
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    SKEW is the interweb, HGTV, HOUZZ, DIY network. The whole country and world is SKEW-ing anymore.

    Id agree Sophie always brings a TOP absolute rare case price as a standard. Bathrooms can be done for 15K all day long. The examples on hi end houzz dont reflect that but you can bet people will try and make it work and be here to share how crappy their angieslist handyman "score" was.

    My point in all this. You dont get all the facts on Houzz EVER.

  • bry911
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    But then you made it clear you arent in the trades your an accountant gone weekender and maybe youre good at it who knows

    Well I grew up in construction had both a plumbing and electricians license....So yeah I am pretty damned good at it.

    but we know thats rare as evidenced here by all the travesties in reno's on these forums

    Ninety five percent of the posts on these forums are from trades taking advantage of people. Do you even look at the posts? How many times have we seen tile installed terribly? So I am sorry if these particular forums are evidence of anything it is the incompetent nature of the trades. Now I am not saying that this the case, people post here when they have a problem, but I am saying it sure as hell isn't evidence to the contrary.

    Jumping to defraud folks now Huh? how about selling a home without permitted bathrooms.....defrauding...

    This is a deflection. I am sure my mom said something about two rights don't make a wrong. Furthermore, can you please show me anywhere I said that bathrooms shouldn't be permitted? I have never made that claim, in fact, I said permitting was pretty easy. Furthermore, there is nothing and I mean absolutely nothing fraudulent about selling a home with unpermitted work done. NOTHING. Now it is fraud if the homeowner doesn't reveal that, but in no way are those things equal.

    But I may be charging wages for the hours of time I spend driving to procure building materials for you at which I pay taxes at the point of sale and I may get my standard 10% markup on that or I may add it to the job if you choose to purchase and procure all that

    I have no idea what you are even trying to say here, but I will note that you are prohibited from benefiting from a 10% markup in either a time and materials or a cost plus contract. So are you saying that you are working in a time and materials contract (assumed because you are charging for driving around) and not passing trade discounts on to your customers?

    Heck I could spend an hour explaining SPF2 KDHT lumber vs KDAT and then have you call me from the lumber yard or show up with abunch of warped lumber.

    Again, this really has nothing to do with a bathroom remodel. Did I advise people to go buy treated lumber? We are talking fixtures and tile.

    But its also the first place people come to complain when it goes horribly wrong.

    See above...

    Someday when an isurance claim gets declined..

    Homeowners insurance can't deny claims for DIY work unless the work was done negligently (which it wouldn't be unless you were intentionally trying to damage your home).

    Furthermore, where am I advocating for a DIY? I didn't. I advocated for consumers purchasing their fixtures and tile smartly. You are all in a bunch about something I never said.

    ETA:

    i know you are a good one at arguing with pros here over the years.

    No I am not. I am a good one at arguing that people think about the marginal costs of projects. There are times and budgets when pros are necessary and I absolutely defend pros when they are needed or when they are right.

    Again, I am not arguing for a DIY project nor did I ever. I am advocating making smart consumer buying choices. There is no legitimate reason that a time and materials contractor needs to be the one to purchase fixtures. Consumers should ensure they are buying the right product and there can be a few problems if the contractor isn't given model numbers and relevant information in advance, however, done properly there are significant savings with no cost to contractor.

  • Andrea
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    We are in the process of remodeling our 4x9 bathroom. My father in law is a contractor. He estimated that if we hire a contractor (not him), labor and materials (materials would be bargain to medium grade buys) it would cost us around $12k. We ended up DIYing a lot of it. We knocked out all our 50s tile, etc. Plumber was a friend, father in law as a GC, we had a friend who does tile for a living do it for us. And as a side note: my tile was a bargain buy and my father in law and tiler said the tiles were of very good quality.

    My mother had a contractor redo her bathroom, approximately the same size. They demoed 50s tile out of the wall, removed the tub and shower and replaced it, new toilet and vanity, new doors, lights, tile, and painting. They charged her $7k for labor and materials.

    Anyone's comments will be misleading as there are so many factors to consider. I think the biggest thing to consider is demographics. We live in Rhode Island. Which in RI it is also, "who you know." My advice is get a few contractors come in and give you a rough estimate so you have an idea.

    Sthefany Linares thanked Andrea
  • FeatherBee
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Maybe if the OP wasn't so vague we could offer better advice :)

    Where is the OP anyway??

    OP, if you come back, please tell us your approx. location, approx. home value, bathroom size, and your wants. Then we can better assist.

  • bry911
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Sometimes the general gets lost in the specifics. So I would like to reiterate my real suggestion and remove the subsequent interpretations.

    Fixtures are a huge chunk of your costs in a bathroom remodel. If we rethink the way we handle updates such as bathrooms and kitchens we might find serious cost savings. I can eliminate more than half of the cost in fixtures and flooring, which means I can get a bathroom that is out of my budget into my budget.

    The advantage to having a contractor buy your fixtures, may not be worth the cost. The village idiot could walk into a quality plumbing supply house (I personally prefer Ferguson) and walk out with a solid understanding of the parts they need. This greatly reduced the need for professionals to help consumers make selections. Personally, I avoid open box, but will take scratch and dent, I picked up a tub on the cheap because the nail flange was frayed and a customer returned it. During a kitchen remodel I grabbed a fridge almost free with a dented door (I popped the dent out before I even got it in the house).

    I am not advocating that anyone DIY everything, the key to DIYing is to know your limits. I am great with plumbing and electrical, I am a whiz with tile, I will never ever do drywall, I suck at it.

    You can almost always find someone to install your fixtures and work with your selections for a small surcharge.

    Nothing I posted is out of line with what Sophie often posts - "good, cheap, fast - pick two". You can save money by removing the time is of the essence requirement for purchasing expensive items.

    I don't understand why an honest contractor would have problems with the arrangement, nor have I ever found one who did. In fact, my experience is that contractors are relieved to have everything there and available before the job starts. However, they may be the exception.

  • thatsmuchbetter
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Your plumber who spends 80k a year at ferguson is gonna have better leverage than you when things go awry is just one tiny example. He may refuse to install anything he doesnt purchase for many reasons. he may install a faulty valve you scored and when it fails youll get a better understanding. Most diy homeowners shop for deals on matrrials and then plumber as well. Its really so subjective to each person.

    Im happy you have found luck and success in your DIY projects. btw

  • bry911
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Your plumber who spends 80k a year at ferguson is gonna have better leverage than you when things go awry is just one tiny example.

    I don't know if that is really true anymore. I certainly know it used to be, but my experiences today tell me that it just isn't the case anymore. The internet has really empowered the consumer, trade discounts are all but gone. Anyone can walk in off the street and get the same deal that the plumber who spends 80k a year at Ferguson does.

    Right before my father passed away he got me a deal on a special order Duravit toilet, the cost was like $20 bucks less than my quote (on a $700 toilet at retail no closeout). His Ferguson account was well into the 7 figures annually.

    Moreover, Ferguson has less leverage over a consumer than they do over a plumber who needs them. I don't need Ferguson, I can write a couple of bad reviews, file a complaint with the BBB, and file a suit against them if I want. Will a plumber who needs them do any of those things? No.

    Even if that is true, what is the value of that? You are telling me that it is worth paying double for. I am telling you that I don't think it is.

    Most diy homeowners shop for deals on matrrials and then plumber as well.

    There is ZERO evidence that this is true. You keep adding in variables and assumptions that make your case better, but they just don't work. Holding all else the same, someone who spends less on materials will have more money to spend on labor. They are actually less likely to cut corners on installation as they spent less on materials.

    People who are budget constrained, are budget constrained. If anything this reduces the risk of hiring a bad contractor.

  • palimpsest
    5 years ago

    I believe the samples are again skewed in GW because we often only see projects from the homeowner if they had a problem with a contractor, not when everything goes great. But I feel like I see problems with expensive product installed by a contractor who did not do it correctly, and I wonder if they are going with a lower labor bid because they splurged on materials. I regularly see on the kitchen forum where best priced was shopped for an expensive stone countertop and then the fabricators screw it up, or that people want to save money installing a "splurge" backsplash by making it their first project. Again, what we see is more often a problem or a complaint--if everything goes great you see good pictures and don't get as many details.

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