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weaversteve98

Anyone grow the BIG Sorrento lemons?

weaversteve98
5 years ago

After having spent numerous vacations on Italy's Amalfi Coast, I am interested to know if anyone here in the states grows the lemon trees (varieties?) that produce the big Sorrento lemons that the region is famous for. You can easily find lemons the size of a small cantaloupe in many outdoor Italian markets, but I have never seen one over here. Anyone either grow them or know of a source? Thank you!


Steve

Comments (72)

  • Matthew Pregeant
    4 years ago

  • Matthew Pregeant
    4 years ago

    This is mine now at three months from the seeds

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  • Kelley_GA8a
    4 years ago

    Beautiful tree, A B! And nice seedlings, Matt :). How did you guys bring the seeds back?

  • A B
    4 years ago

    Matthew no fruit yet, the resort in Positano that we stayed at gave it to me, fresh hand picked and I brought it back! I’m in NJ and I keep it indoors in winter and out in summer. Just pruned the sucker branches today, I feed mine every month during summer! Soil is regular potting soil!

  • A B
    4 years ago

    BTW I just had one lemon, brought it back cut it in half to find only one seed! Luckily I didn’t damage that seed while cutting the lemon open! This is the plant from that only seed that I had

  • Kelley_GA8a
    4 years ago
    A B, did you bring the entire lemon back or just the seeds?
  • A B
    4 years ago

    Kelley I brought the lemon back

  • Kelley_GA8a
    4 years ago
    Thanks, AB - that’s good to know! I’m planning a visit in the next year, just to obtain a lemon/seeds lol. I drove right past Positano, even stopped in Salerno several years back (long before I was growing citrus). The house we rented had a lemon tree in the yard with giant lemons on it. I’ve been kicking myself ever since. Keep us updated on your tree :)
  • johnmerr
    4 years ago

    Nik,

    "regardless what Guatemala Johnny thinks",, must you always have to pretend that you are smarter than everyone else? That is not what I think; it is what the Citrus Industry "bible" states; if you are smarter than that, just tell us now; and instead of reading or following long established information, we can just ask you.


  • nikthegreek
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Johnboy, does the citrus industry think that Amalfi lemons are Diamante citrons? I would like to see the faces of the Italian growers being told that by whatever or whoever you define as the citrus industry. They have been growing citrons for lemons for two hundred years but nobody from the citron growing areas a few miles down the road told them the truth about it and they haven't read that book of yours... Gosh, their famous limoncello should be called cedrocello instead. Or better, let them tell me that while I squeeze the juice off my 'thick lemons' and cut my almost juiceless Diamantes in pieces for candying them. It is obvious that you have no clue about what you're talking about and certainly no personal experience. You have never seen either a Sorrento lemon or a Diamante citron because if you had only seen them (not to mention smell them or taste them) you wouldn't be parroting this bull out of that bible of yours now. You would be writing to the editor instead. Unless you're reading the wrong page out of that book.. As I've said before, you're such a laugh sometimes.

  • nikthegreek
    4 years ago

    Kelley,

    I don't know the facts, but I wouldn't be too sure that those lemons come true to type from seed. Italian grower's tale has it that these lemons have sour orange blood in them and I'm pretty sure they have some citron genes too. So unless they exhibit high nucellar embryony the probability is that they will not come true to type.

  • Kelley_GA8a
    4 years ago
    Thanks for the info, Nik! I’m sure environment also plays a huge role in how they taste/turn out as well. My husband works for a major airline and has flight benefits, so it would definitely be worth the gamble to me. Plus, I’d love to actually visit Amalfi this time around :)
  • Vladimir (Zone 5b Massachusetts)
    4 years ago

    I believe it is illegal to import citrus fruit or seeds.

  • johnmerr
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Nik,.

    If you think you have a Sorrento lemon; because you brought it from Sorrento? Sorrento is not a variety; it is a regional name, involving maybe more than a dozen varieties, most being Feminello (sp). Maybe you also grow Bordeaux grapes. What you see, or what someone tells you is not always science. Every one of my Meyer trees has a certificate of origin to trace it scientifically, not by what someone says, to its roots. This same sort of argument attaches to "Seville" oranges; the history and source of "sour orange" is as confusing as any; because there are a thousand stories; but little science/DNA.

  • nikthegreek
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    You love putting words in people's mouth, don't you John?

    So now they are Feminello's not Diamante citrons eh? You're right for a change..

    As I said earlier there are 2 commercially named types of large lemons in the Amalfi / Sorrento area. The Sfusato Amalfitano and the Limone di Sorrento (also called Ovale di Sorrento). The latter belong indeed to the feminello group but are larger. The former are even larger and they too should belong to the feminello group but I can't confirm it. If you have seen them you will recognise them. I have no idea if there are a dozen or 10 dozen genetically different but related lemon varieties or just different cultivars branded as such and it doesn't really matter. By the way, you might know (or not) that cultivars / selections of any plant more often than not cannot be distinguished by DNA sequencing. So much for your science then.

    I never said I have a 'Sorrento' lemon. I said I have a 'thick lemon' tree which very closely resembles the Sfusato which I have seen and consumed. Italy is not far from here, one can go there by boat, car or plane as you might know and I have been all over paying particular attention to citrus. Also, most of our local varieties have come from Italy, this trend having started more than a hundred years ago and is continuing still. Main Greek lemon production is of the 'Maglini' cultivar which is a local Feminello group selection. Similarly in Italy. Seems that feminellos love our shared conditions (and if mal secco was not a problem most probably no other lemon varieties would be grown). Coming back to the Amalfi lemons, such large lemons like the Sfusato are not uncommon all over the Med. I have stated this above but you didn't bother reading. None of the above mentioned lemons are citrons by the way.

    I'm sure you'd rather see all lemons disappear and the world being taken over by your mandarine-orange flavoured Meyer non-lemons but I think you will have to wait long for this to happen. By the way, most (if not all) so called lemons of commercial importance in the western hemisphere are true lemons and their differences are due to mutations and cultivar selection not hybridisation, similarly to oranges. Meyers are not lemons, phenotypically the fruit (not the tree) resembles lemons but they seem not to be even lemon hybrids, they probably come from an altogether different original species cross (pomelo x mandarin) x citron according to a 2016 study.

  • Emely Torres
    4 years ago

    Hello i will like to plant one i brought lemon no seed :(

  • rkennia25
    4 years ago

    Saw that you guys were wondering if there is any of those "lemons" here in the states and I can say yes. I live in Napa California (AKA little Italy) or the wine county. Here in my backyard I had a tree that never gave anything until I decided to almost cut it down. Next thing I know, the tree grew and started to give these monstrous "lemons". I figured that they were the same as the ones from Italy because the soil and weather here is very much similar to the one in Italy. So if you are looking for a place to grow this beautiful fruit then you can definitely do it in this part of California. Don't know if they actually grow any here to sell in markets since I've never seen them at the store but it is possible that other people around my area have some in their backyard. Would love to post a picture of my tree if you would like to see. Let me know! :)

  • HU-839812811
    4 years ago

    This is my 4 year old Sorrento ‘lemon’ tree grown from a germinating seed I found inside one of the giant fruits. Lots of lush foliage with an amazing lemon scent from the leaves. I’m just wondering how long it will take until I see some fruit??




  • isde02(zone5b)
    4 years ago

    Not sure if these are the ones you guys are talking about but these were the largest lemons I've ever seen. I saw them at my local botanical garden and had to take pictures. There were a few that were the size of a football!!

  • Jade R
    4 years ago

    rkennia25 I'd love to see a photo! I live in the East Bay and have been looking to grow a Sfusato Amalfitano tree and curious if they do grow well here in our Italian like climates!

  • HU-839332404
    3 years ago

    I would imagine that a Meyers lemon would be the closest American equivalent. If you have ever gone to a fair and had their lemonade, they use these lemons. They are huge and closer to the size of a small orange than a lemon. This is a Florida favorite - as they are sweeter than any other lemon variety.

  • mattpregeant
    3 years ago
    These are my plants from 10 almost 11 months ago from a seed that I got from lemon in sorrento. I heard that it is rare to get lemons from a plant that was grown from a seed and not grafted. And if you do that it isn’t any good and there is no telling what type of lemon you’ll get. Any truth to that? I’m not very familiar. These are the first of any plant that I’ve ever grown.
  • Colleen Marone
    3 years ago

    We live in NJ, we have eight of these lemon trees. The seeds were gifted from my husbands‘ sisters father in law Michael. We give young trees as gifts. We have two trees that are 6 years old and haven’t produced lemons, no idea why.


  • poncirusguy6b452xx
    3 years ago

    They won't start producing till they are about 8-12 feet tall.

  • PRO
    Back
    3 years ago

    I pruned it recently! It had a major growth spurt in last two weeks!

  • L P
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    I have

  • L P
    3 years ago

    2

  • Silica
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    As a professional you should know better then to prune a young seed grown citrus tree. Pruning a young citrus tree grown from seed will greatly delay its fruiting, as pruning reduces the tree's node count and thus cannot reach maturity..

  • Kathleen C
    3 years ago

    mattpregeant I have read conflicting reports on whether a lemon tree grown from seed will bear fruit. I'm going to try regardless! I brought a lemon home from Positano in June. Five seeds germinated. They are about a foot tall right now. I'm about to put them in larger pots and bring them in for the winter. I'll post some pictures soon. I'd love to see how much your trees have grown since your post in February!

  • daisy_guzman1
    2 years ago


    This is my little lemon tree that I planted from a lemon from sorrento. It’s been about a year. We are in the Dominican Republic. I hope we get a nice tree

  • Tom Richard
    2 years ago

    If any of the US based commenters have Amalfi seeds from their plants, I am very motivated to get some seeds to grow down here in Florida. Specifically Amalfi Coast in origin.

  • mattpregeant
    2 years ago

    This is my tree now Kathleen

  • genjingles
    2 years ago

    Hi Everyone!


    I live in Southern California and have been searching desperately for Sfusato Amalfitano and Limone di Sorrento seeds or seedling for a couple years now. I noticed some of you purchased seeds. May I ask where you found the seeds or who sells trees?

  • Christy Joyx
    last year

    I’d love to buy some seeds if anyone wants to sell any to me!

  • HU-113562633
    last year

    I planted a few seeds that germinated and all but one of the plants has died. This one is ~18" tall and has made it through the winter. I would love any guidance people might have about how I should tend to it, as I don't have anything close to a green thumb!


    I could plant it NY outdoors either in Zone 5b or 7b, or I could keep it in a pot and take it in for winter.


    Would it be happier if planted outside so it would have more room to grow? Or does it like coming inside for winter (as it did this past winter)? If I keep it in a container so I can bring it inside, how big should the container be so it has enough room to grow roots? Any guidance on what type of soil to use, what to feed it, how often to feed it, how often to water it, how to transition it to outdoors once the last freeze has passed, if/when I might get fruit, etc?


    Thanks!



  • Jill
    last year

    Omg would someone sell me some Amalfi seeds?? Or Positano or anything else? My friend’s mom wants some and I can’t seem to find any. She is an avid gardener and it would bring her so much joy.

  • Lauren Hanson
    9 months ago

    Anyone looking for seeds, here is a link to an Etsy seller I just got some from!:

    https://www.etsy.com/ca/listing/1142971730/sfusato-amalfitano-lemons-5-fresh-seeds?ref=cart

  • Chris Martinez
    5 months ago

    I have some seeds that i broght back from sorrento 3 years ago. i am trying to germinate some now… if they stick id be happy to share the left overs with anyone in need.

  • HU-212815594
    5 months ago

    Good luck as they may be aged.

  • Chris Martinez
    2 months ago

    Ill be in sorrento in November ’23, let me know if anyone wants me to get them seeds.

  • Anita Bier
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Chris, I would love some seeds. I'm also looking for both varieties, Amalfi and Sorrento. I am in Illinois. Please let me know if you’re able to find any.

  • mattpregeant
    2 months ago

    My plant is now three years old and is about 15ft tall

  • mattpregeant
    2 months ago

    Is it possible to mail a stem or branch? Would it stay alive long enough to try and graph to my existing lemon tree? I’m hearing mix opinions on wether or not they will grow lemons from just a seed.

  • HU-113562633
    2 months ago

    @mattpregeant 15ft? That's amazing. Mine is 3-4 years old and just 3 ft. (I'm in NY state.)


    Has yours fruited? Where are you located?

  • mattpregeant
    2 months ago

    I’m in south Louisiana. No it has not fruited

  • mattpregeant
    2 months ago

    I

  • mattpregeant
    2 months ago

    Lots of thorns

  • HU-113562633
    2 months ago

    It's beautiful! Mine is in a planter, as I have been taking it inside for the winter.

  • moosemac
    2 months ago

    Logee's Greenhouse in Danielson, CT. has 100+ year old lemon tree in one of their greenhouses. That tree produces huge lemons like you describe.