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lonejack2

Veggie Tales - May 2017

Well here we are in May when summer supposedly starts and our gardens start to produce in abundance. The April thread set a new record for posts and I imagine that this one may top that. Everyone should be able to get their gardens fully planted this month and the harvest of the cool season crops should start rolling in.

Comments (391)

  • Steve Lng Islnd NY Z-7a SunSet Z-34
    5 years ago

    Kevin, the trap is right in it's path. Something set off the trap last night but was able to get out. So I have now staked the trap to ground and used less bait to force it to come in a little more.

  • isgen
    5 years ago

    Picked more d'Avignon radishes today and I have my sense of taste back! Partially at least! The green tops made for a tasty sauté with just a bit of olive oil, salt and pepper.


    The above plus yesterday's picking makes for 80% or so from my initial planting in the first week of April, with two more equal plantings the following two weeks, which are coming in really fast too! We'll almost literally have to stuff ourselves with radishes and lettuce in the coming week to make room for tender crops, which are really itching to be planted out. Looks like I'll be able to get some of my peppers outside on the weekend, possibly the Physalis as well. Tomatoes will wait for next weekend or so.


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  • Sloan Quinn 8b
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    @isgen, you should try making dill chips out of those radishes. Seriously - they're delicious on a burger. Just do 'em exactly like you'd make cucumber dill chips. It's a good way to use up a bunch of radishes. :-) I totally have you beat for Franken-radishes, though, probably since mine are your standard "round" type (they're definitely not round now.) I'll have to snap a pic of some of my bigger ones. Is the knife one of the little stick-it-on-your-keychain ones, or one of the bigger ones with a corkscrew and the kitchen sink?

    @Kevin, I'm hoping I'll actually get some decent carrots out of that first batch, but I'm somewhat worried that having to regrow all their foliage will kill the sweetness. As for the corn, from what I've read, aphids aren't really a huge threat to corn...as long as they don't go moving in with the leaf-footed bugs on the tomatoes a couple of rows over I should be alright. That would really make me mad.

    I'll try and remember to take my phone out to the garden in the morning. The peanuts really are impressively large now, considering the size they were at a month ago. And don't even talk to me about weeds. I've just been pulling off the seed heads for the last week or so. Unfortunately, the weather this weekend doesn't look like it's going to be encouraging me to get down and pull a bunch of weeds out.

    @Dawson, I'd be proud of those peppers, too. My little pepper-in-a-pot is mad at me right now. It really needs fertilizer, but we had a bunch of rain a few days ago so I left off watering/fertilizing my potted plants till today...and then I got lazy, so I'll have to do that tomorrow. Especially since we're supposed to have yet more rain early next week. As it is, I've got a live-forever that I just stuck in an old coffee can that I'm going to have to repot soon - it's not liking alternating between being parched and having wet feet. Of course, as per my note to Kevin, the one I have in the ground is becoming overrun by weeds and grass, which I still need to pull out.

    @Chris, how's that peanut seedling?

    @Jack, you have fun with those sub-80 temps - we're in the mid-80s to mid-90s for most of the next two weeks, and it only goes uphill from there.

    (So I just tried to paste a screen-grab of my weather forecast here and was told my post was 137526 characters too long! What gives?)

    If I manage to get the garden somewhat cleaned up this weekend I'll try and snap tour pics again, but TBH, not that much has changed, other than things getting bigger and bush bean plants dropping like flies.

  • isgen
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    @Sloan Quinn,

    Radish dill chips sounds like a good idea. I'd use a big 3-4" Daikon for this perhaps, one slice covers the whole burger!

    The Swiss Army Knife is a full-size unit, 3.5" long. Let's see these Franken-radish of yours!

  • Sloan Quinn 8b
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Using daikon's not a bad idea. I've never grown any, though, and they don't sell it at the grocer's here, so I can't say whether it would be the same or not. I might go for some big Champion radishes, though - the ones that get 2" across - they might fit in the jar better.

    And I'll try to get out to the garden with my phone later today - it's raining on and off this morning, which always makes me sleepy.

    I still owe y'all some peanut pics, though, so I guess I'll have to quit being lazy!

    ETA: Also, I have officially given up on my original carrot patch - the deer came back for a visit a couple nights ago. I think I might have to get some Deer-off. I'll leave the original patch since it seems to be so distracting to them - there's minimal deer damage everywhere else, but I don't think it'll be long before they start in on other plants.

  • isgen
    5 years ago

    I might try to grow some daikon for the fall. The ones I get in the store are usually quite mild and have a subtle flavour, but are crisp and refreshing. Asian groceries might carry some if there are any in your area.

    Too bad about the deer damage. :/

  • Sloan Quinn 8b
    5 years ago

    Heh. No, we're lucky to have Asain restaurants around here. There's a Thai place in the city I like to go to when I'm there, just because most of our options here...well. Let's just say I've gotten quite good at stir-frying in a cast iron skillet. (protip: If you try that, you might want to do it on the grill...my vent hood was not up to the challenge.)

    Still haven't gotten you those pics, but I did go pull about half a dozen more bean plants. After shelling those and the ones I pulled a while back, I've got all of about three ounces of beans. :-/ It's much, much better than it could be, but I just know that all those plants should still be green and flowering. Hopefully the rest of the plants manage to put on enough to at least get a decent pot of chili out of them. Interesting thing, though - most all of the plants that have already died turned out to be red kidney beans. There have been a few of the Jacob's Cattle, but I don't think I've seen any of the Spanish Tolosana beans yet. Hopefully those will prove resistant, but at this point I'm pretty much waiting for the rest to die so I can spread out some plastic and solarize the row.

  • itsmce (zone 6b, Kansas)
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Oh, happy day! I found the first new potatoes of the season in the garden today. I had been checking for spuds under a plant that has blossomed for a week or more, but didn't find any. Decided to check under a different plant and I scored! A little more searching under a few more plants and I had enough for a meal.

    The other good news is that I found marble sized tomatoes on a couple plants. Finally!

    Sadly, the peas are about finished, but the sugar snap peas look like they'll keep going for awhile. I'm sure the Kansas heat will shit them down soon.

    I pulled a couple heads of garlic too. I'm a newbie with it so wasn't sure what to expect. I'm pleased.

  • Michael Harris (Zone 5B WI)
    5 years ago

    Somewhat of a rhetorical question... but I decided to experiment and pull on my garlic plants. The root was about the size of a golf ball, however there wasnt really any bulbs. It had more the consistency of small onion. However, it smells pretty garicly.

    Can I just cut it up and use it right away? And will the other garlic form bulbs as time goes on?

  • itsmce (zone 6b, Kansas)
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Michael- I'm new to the garlic game, but I believe you can use it at anytime. People talk of green garlic, that's what you pulled today if I'm not mistaken. If you leave other plants in the ground, they should bulb up nicely. In zone 5, you're quite a bit behind me in the growing season, I would guess.

  • Chris (6a NY)
    5 years ago

    Michael, yes that would be considered "green garlic", when its harvested before the cloves form. That size is about normal for this time. You can use the bulb and the stem, which is usually still tender at this point. You probably have a good month or more until you harvest your garlic. Usually it's about a month after the scapes emerge(if you're growing hardneck varieties). My scapes just starting coming out now.

  • Peter (6b SE NY)
    5 years ago

    It is cold and wet here with no end in sight. The brassicas love it but not much else. My garlic is rotting pretty bad, I have pulled up about 10 plants so far. I am really bummed about it. Next year if I grow it again, it needs an isolated raised bed with fresh stock. My eggplants and peppers are not enjoying the weather at all. Tomatoes are ok so far. Still no beets, I planted some more but they are prone to damping off...

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    Sorry to hear about your garlic Peter. I thought you planted it in a raised bed this year, no? I don't think my garlic harvest is going to be all that great this year either but most of the early types are starting to yellow so it won't be too much longer until harvest. We have a lot of rain in our forecast too which might make it a challenge to find a window to dig my garlic and potatoes when the time comes.

    We had a pretty good storm roll thru here on Saturday with some pea sized hail combined with high winds. I now have holey (or is it holy?) beans, cuke, and potato leaves. Nothing that the plants won't be able to bounce back from though.

    My snow peas came down with powdery mildew so I harvested the remaining pods and pulled the plants on Sunday. I didn't want the PM to spread to my cukes and pole beans nearby. Yesterday I planted some more Rattlesnake pole beans where the peas had been. I think my Provider push beans may be coming down with yellow mosaic virus. Supposedly it is spread by aphids from nearby clover. I haven't noticed any aphids on the beans but then I don't take my reading glasses out to the garden. lol I do have quite a bit of clover around the garden beds.

    I am almost up to 60 lbs. total harvest now. I picked all of the remaining main heads of broccoli and another 1.5 lb. of broccolini. Total harvest of brassicas is at 25 lbs. with only side shoots to go. I also picked 2 heads of Sparx lettuce that were huge and 3 heads of mini romaine that totaled 12 lbs. I gave most of the lettuce to my neighbors.


  • Peter (6b SE NY)
    5 years ago

    How are you liking that broccolini Jack? I remember you were very excited to plant it.

    My lettuce is doing ok, especially the Muir is doing really great, I will have plenty of lettuce to eat. My peas are doing ok too, smaller than they should be but not too bad and the forecast looks great for them, I saw the first flower yesterday, they are only about 4 feet high and the Sugar Snaps grow to 8+. My zucchini and winter squashes and pumpkins are off to a good start.

    I did plant the garlic in a raised bed, but I made the mistake of planting the Music in it, which may have been infected. Whatever it is sure looks like white rot, it is white fluffy mold and forms black sclerotia, but from what I read white rot is devastating and rapidly takes down an entire planting, which doesn't happen, also the infected garlic if it manages to bulb usually stores ok, and I have only seen it infect leeks once or twice and not onions... knock on wood. At the least, even if it all rots, I will get some nice scapes.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    I really like the Aspabroc Peter but it isn't as productive as I thought it would be. So far I have only harvested about 1/2 lb. per plant. The florets aren't as large and tight as they were in the pictures but it is actually the stems that I like best....they are really tender.

    Are your Jericho lettuce doing well? I have one Jericho remaining but the heart hasn't quite finished forming up yet but I think it is going to stay cool enough this week for it to finish up before bolting.

    I've had Botrytis neck rot on a couple types before. It seems to be more prevalent on Estonia Red and Siberian than some other types. According to Cornell, it can be caused by cool, wet conditions or too much nitrogen and can be exacerbated by intense plantings. I don't see any sign of neck rot this year so far.

    When you harvest your garlic, make sure to keep any 'iffy' looking bulbs away from the ones that look good while curing.

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA
    5 years ago

    Jack - 60 lbs!? That's awesome! I had forgot I planned to try to keep track of the harvest this year so I went back into my spreadsheet and estimated the past couple weeks worth of kale, lettuce, strawberries, and peas. I am at around 8 lbs.

    My broccoli is just about ready to harvest I think, although I have never grown it...I assume you want to catch it right before it starts to flower? The heads are not all that big (maybe 5 inches in diameter) but I've read that's typical for my variety (Lieutenant).

    Got the posts set for the grape vines and strung the top line (still need to decide how to tension it).

    Only 3 nebby neighbors stopped and asked me if I was building a fence and that I needed to get permission/permit. I told them its not a fence, to help themselves to grapes when they come in, and muttered under my breath to mind your own business.

    View from top of driveway:

    View from our front porch:

    OT but I also got that muddy mess of a driveway pressure washed - 5+ hours of it yesterday plus the shoveling of about 20 garden carts full of mud!

    The source of the mess was around 200 trips of my neighbor's excavator dumping a few hundred yards of fill dirt he was getting rid of over my hillside. Maybe the nebbys will back off if I can keep the place looking a little more tidy.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Looking good Kevin! Are the grapes growing much yet?

    Yep 60 lbs. so far. About 2/3 of it has been the broccoli, cauliflower and asparagus. I won't be harvesting much in the next week or 2 but then it will go up considerably when the potatoes, garlic, and onions start to finish up in the second half of June. Just those 3 things should be about 200 lbs. once the garlic and onions are cured and trimmed for storage.

    Harvesting broccoli can take a little experience. Just keep a close eye out a pick them before they show much sign of the heads loosening up.

  • itsmce (zone 6b, Kansas)
    5 years ago

    Jack - Just how big is your garden spot?!? 60 lbs. of the crops you listed sounds like a bunch. I'm not good at tracking the weights of the early crops, but I do always track my cantaloupe and watermelons as they come along.

    I cut a couple more heads of broccoli this morning. I wish I remembered the variety, but I've lost track. Whatever it is, I don't think the heads its producing are as big as what I usually get with Pacman.

  • Chris (6a NY)
    5 years ago

    Peter, I'm sorry to hear about the garlic. Hopefully you'll still get a decent harvest. My plants appear to be healthy from above, but who knows what shape the bulbs are in with this cool, wet weather. High 62 today and misty. I hope we don't go from 60's and 70's right to 90's. The peas have definitely taken a liking to this weather and I supposed that the alliums like it too, minus the moisture.

    Jack, impressive harvest total already! I bought a small scale, but keep forgetting to use it. I guess I haven't really had much to weigh yet anyway. What was your favorite harvested vegetable so far? I'm gonna go with Cheddar cauliflower lol. How are the tomatoes and peppers coming along?

    Kevin, you already won the Garden Improvement award, you can stop now! lol Good move telling them to help themselves to grapes. I always liked the "kill them with kindness" approach. It's looking great and will become a great living fence!

  • Chris (6a NY)
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Yukon Gold really starting to catch up now.
    Purple Majesty potato plants are growing really well! Hopefully it won't be all bark and no bite when it comes to harvest time.
    I decided I didn't have enough room to grow plants, so naturally I built more beds.
    Evergreen Bunching onions getting big, growing alongside the strawberries.

  • Chris (6a NY)
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    All of the pictures didn't come through on that last post.

    Here is the pollinator garden. Bought this Bee Balm a month or so ago and it's doing really well. Catmint is getting bigger and bigger every year. Gonna have to start trimming it. Anise Hyssop won't flower for a bit yet and you can see the clover growing all over the place.
    I've been busy building and planting these past few weekends. Wanted to try out a modified version of a design I saw, so I built this for my godfather. Thinking of starting a business, so getting as much experience as possible.
    This is it after planting vegetables this weekend.

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Chris - I don't even like calling it a living fence, with fears that someone will make me pay for a permit I keep that particular f-word out of my vocabulary! Its a trellis for my landscaping.

    Those beds are AWESOME!

    ETA - I posted before seeing the keyhole bed. Even more AWESOME! That garden improvement award is not locked in with me!

  • Chris (6a NY)
    5 years ago

    Thanks, Kevin!

    Haha yeah seriously, they'll do anything to get you to pay up.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    itsmcs - I have 21 raised beds totaling just under 700 sq. ft.

    Chris - Your potatoes and bunching onions look perfect. How do you get the onions to all line up perfectly like that? Mine are being crowded by the broccoli plants and all leaning towards the light. And those new beds look fantastic and the soil looks like some great stuff. Nicely done and happy growing!

    Its hard to choose my favorite harvest so far but the Cheddar is right up there. Yesterday being Memorial day I grilled out of course. I put together a grilled veggie medley of snow peas, garlic scapes, broccoli, cauliflower, green onions, and red cippolini onion from this year's garden and frozen carrots and peppers from last years garden. Yum!! Brought the leftovers to have for lunch today in a few minutes.

  • Chris (6a NY)
    5 years ago

    Thanks, Jack! I am most excited to see how the potatoes turn out. I realize planting potatoes in pots really isn't cost effective, but I am a sucker for experimenting. I'm hoping since I used 45 gal grow bags, that the harvest will be pretty good. I planted 3 Kennebec seed potatoes yesterday, that have been sitting around, in a 15 gal grow bag. I realize it's late, but did I mention I like experimenting? I just planted the bunching onions and they did the rest lol. How do you use your bunching onions? I have big plans for those new beds! They are both 3x10, which means I'm going to have LOOOOTS of garlic next year :-)

    Grilled veggies, nothing better! Sounds delicious! I have yet to experience homegrown cauliflower, but from what I hear, I will be very pleased with the taste.

  • Peter (6b SE NY)
    5 years ago

    Wow those beds are amazing Chris!

    The cauliflower I grew last year was the best cauliflower I have ever tasted, hands down. It was buttery and melted in your mouth.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    Chris - I forgot to say that you pollinator garden is really pretty! I don't grow much for pollinators but I do have quite a bit of clover growing in my lawn that attracts a lot of bumble bees. My wife also has several butterfly bushes.

    I use the bunching onions mostly in salads and stir fry or just eat them raw dipped in a little ranch dressing. They are really sweet compared to most onions.

  • Chris (6a NY)
    5 years ago

    Thanks, Peter! I'm hoping to have a fall crop of cauliflower.

    Thanks, Jack. The picture doesn't do it justice, but once the Hyssop and clover flowers it should be some sight!

    I failed at growing the bunching onions last year, so didn't get a chance to try them. Looking forward to tasting these!

  • Sunflowers
    5 years ago

    I'm jealous of all of these beautiful raised beds! I wish I could turn my entire 50' x 20' garden area into raised beds, but with the two large Elm trees nearby I've discovered a problem with tree roots invading the beds, so I added another in-ground section this year to see if that's easier to manage. I ate my first backyard grown broccoli head last week! Nice and tender, albeit on the small side (I got excited). We're eating plenty of sugar snap peas and are just about sick of lettuce.


    A few other updates:

    Potatoes in a container - Still thriving, no flowers yet

    Pepper plants - Still have holes in them, applying Sluggo and diatomaceous earth regularly after rains

    Tomatoes - Three new transplants are settling in. Three plants hit with herbicide drift are hobbling along and will be an experiment.

    Beets - Not sure when to harvest, so they're just sitting there...

    Garlic - VERY curious what's going on under the soil. I think I have scapes.

    Blueberries - Coming along nicely and covered by bird netting


    Eaten by rabbits/squirrels/birds - Cucumber seedlings, zinnia seedlings, bean seedlings, bachelor's button seedlings, snapdragon seedlings, and $20 worth of nice succulents.


    I do have a question for anyone who has grown Arp rosemary (LoneJack)? The two starters I bought are in their own separate pots on the deck. They both are growing very tall instead of bushy. Can I top them to encourage bushy growth?

  • Sunflowers
    5 years ago

    Oh I should mention that last night I made a homemade squirrel deterrent spray for some of my potted annuals that were getting eaten and dug up. A handful of Habanero peppers, 3 Jalapeno peppers, half an onion and some cayenne pepper on the stove in about 6 cups of water for 30 minutes. Then strained through a coffee filter and put in a spray bottle. It was hard to stay in the kitchen for more than a minute while it was boiling because it made me cough haha


    Not the safest (although I wore glasses, gloves and had a fan on) but I hope it will light a fire in the mouth of any squirrel who dares to nibble on my potted plants!

  • Peter (6b SE NY)
    5 years ago

    Sorry about the loses Sunflowers. Glad you are enjoying some stuff.

    Oh I almost forgot to share, I almost stepped on this im my garden this weekend.

  • Sloan Quinn 8b
    5 years ago

    This is getting old - I've tried to post this three times now, and it's gotten lost every time. Grr. Let's try again. Pardon me if some of this seems a little condensed.

    @Sunflowers - hot pepper concoctions of all kinds are an old classic remedy for furred varmint issues. Your brew should work - good luck!

    @Jack and Chris - the Japanese - AKA Masters of Everything Pickled - make rakkyo out of the small bulbs of scallion onions. IDK if bunching onions like that really bulb up at all, but bulbs about an inch across or less make excellent tsukemono. And I've never had a tsukemono I didn't like.

    Question time: I've had two tomatoes in the garden that developed some kind of black rot at the stem end, then developed large watery spots in the tomato flesh. One, which was almost ripe, was pretty much a tomato-skin bag full of water and seed. The skin broke and the seed plopped out as I was removing it from the plant. It was gross. I know I've read about whatever this is, but I can't for the life of me remember what it is. No other part of the plants are showing signs of disease. Anybody know?

    And at last, I've got pics of the peanuts. As a refresher, here's the peanut patch a month ago:

    And here it is now:

    It grew, rather.

    Peanuts are still cool. They're still flowering, but now they have all these little fingers on them. Apparently, each one of those fingers is going to plant itself in the ground and make a peanut. This is about an 8" section of stem. There are about a dozen stems per plant...I can see how the things I've read say you can get 100 peanuts per plant.

    Here's a pic of some that have already hit dirt:

    @isgen, here's my franken-radishes. I didn't bring anything out for scale, but these are bigger than my 6.5"x3.5" phone:

    This is the one the deer et. I'm kind of hoping that the shock will make it send up flower stalks, but no joy yet. It's putting on new leaves as fast as the deer can et them, though.

    This one's actually bigger than the first - the greens on it are bigger than the cabbage growing right next to it.

    Just for fun. This one wasn't actually bigger than the others, at least until it, erm....kersploded. Now I think I'll call it Pac-Radish. Maybe I should start feeding it cherries. Eat all the cabbage loopers! wakawakawakawaka.....

    Just had a bit of a storm hit us. About 45 minutes of sideways rain, 60 mph wind gusts, corn doing a hula dance. I'd say about a 7 on the May Storm Scale. I've yet to go out and see how things fare in the garden, but at least the house didn't blow down this year.

    And now to try again...submit...

  • Sloan Quinn 8b
    5 years ago

    Success! It's still raining, though....

  • Steve Lng Islnd NY Z-7a SunSet Z-34
    5 years ago

    I feel like it's rained for the month of may here.

  • naturegirl_2007 5B SW Michigan
    5 years ago

    Sloan Quinn, it sounds like your tomatoes had a really bad case of blossom end rot (BER) Usually, warmer weather and consistent moisture solve the problem for later fruits. Paste tomatoes seem to be particularly prone to suffer from BER. I hope your next tomatoes are better. It's no fun to be grossed out in the garden.

    Glad to hear your house wasn't blown down. Hope the garden fared okay, too.

  • naturegirl_2007 5B SW Michigan
    5 years ago

    Oops, I gave the wrong answer above. I see now that your tomato rot is at the stem end, not the blossom end....not sure what that is.

  • Sloan Quinn 8b
    5 years ago

    @Steve, we have years every so often that are like that from March through the middle of June - year before last we hit our entire annual rainfall total in 2 1/2 months. Not so this year - just the occasional smack in the face that comes from being right in the No Man's Land between three different weather patterns.

    Then we dry out until mid August or so, and hurricane season, whereupon, depending on the year, we proceed to get soaked again, sometimes until November. Last year in Aug. we got a foot of rain in about 4-5 hours one night. We've got lots of shiny new fences around this year, if you know what I mean. A couple folks around here had just cut and rowed their hayfields, too. Felt really sorry for them.

  • Chris (6a NY)
    5 years ago

    Sunflowers, container taters are doing well, huh? I'm excited for harvest time. I'm just starting to notice flower buds on my Purple Majesty. Sorry to hear about the seedling losses. The battle against nature is never-ending! Good luck with your concoction!

    Peter, that Garter snake looks like he bit off more than he can swallow? lol We need snakes to help take out the mice population, especially with this tick problem we have.

    Sloan, I will have to look into pickling. If all goes well I want to try pickling hot peppers and cucumbers this year. Sorry to hear about your tomatoes. Are they showing signs of mold on the stem end of the tomato? Maybe Botrytis? Those peanut plants are looking great!!

  • Sloan Quinn 8b
    5 years ago

    No, no mold. Just a bit of black right where the stem meets the tomato. I honestly was hoping it was just physiological cracking, but then BAM! Great big hunk of nasty watery mess. Bummer.

  • babushka_cat
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Introducing my new garden visitor, a young gray fox. Saw what was probably the mother in December of last year, think this is her offspring. They are living in the lot next door (infirmed elderly man, yard overgrown). There were 2 twin foxes running around for a bit but now I only see one, thinking one might have been caught by coyotes. These guys can climb! Picture below of same fox on roof of my neighbors house. I was in living room and saw fox walk by the window???

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Those pictures are great Babushka! Foxes are so cool and smart. Last year about this time we had a mother fox get hit by a car and her young kits didn't know what to do. They were hanging out with neighborhood dogs. I would see them just laying around in peoples front yards or playing like puppies without a care in the world.

    @Sunflowers - sorry about the casualties. It sounds like you have a good defense plan concocted. I think your Arp rosemary(s) will bush out on their own given time but if you have need to use some for culinary purposes then snip the stems towards the top.

    @Sloan - I'm not sure what the problem is on your tomatoes either. Could it be caused by pest damage that initiated the rot? Very frustrating but hopefully just isolated to a few fruit. Those don't look like any kind of radish I have ever seen...definitely monstrous looking! I hope your garden fared OK during the storm...at least you won't have to water for a few days.

    Bunching onions don't really bulb up at all. They get to maybe 1/2" in diameter max. Around about June or July they will brown up and go dormant for a couple months and then start to grow again around September and eventually start to divide. If left to overwinter they can be separated and replanted in the early spring.

    @Peter - I can't quite make out what the snake is trying to eat. Is that a toad?

  • Peter (6b SE NY)
    5 years ago

    Wow what a beautiful fox, I wish I had one of those in my garden!

    @Jack, here is a better picture. Its a toad.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    lol..what a way to go! Did it eventually swallow it or did it give up?

  • isgen
    5 years ago

    Yet more lettuce and radishes, time for another salad! We'll still be at those for a while. It may sound like I'm complaining, but I totally brought this upon myself! :)


  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Nice harvest once again isgen! I hear you on the lettuce overdose. I've harvested 12 lbs. of romaine in the last week Even though I gave away about 1/2 of it we've still had salads for supper every day and I brought a big container full of salad to work to have for lunch the rest of the week. I don't have any radishes though.

    I really prefer the fall garden (mid Septemberish) for salad materials because I am able to harvest lettuce, radishes, peppers, baby carrots, green onions, broccoli, and cherry tomatoes all at the same time

  • isgen
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    My space is too limited for me to ever be eating a 100% from my garden salad. When I get cukes, tomatoes and peppers, the lettuce and spring radishes will be long gone. Maybe I should try some late season container lettuce this year and make it happen.

  • Kevin Zone 6b - PIT, PA
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Wow everyones pictures are A+++! Sloan those peanut plants are so cool and Isgen continues with the seed catalog worthy radishes!

    Lots of good predators too, its a shame the toad had to go but you win some you lose some.

    Adding to the predator theme with less photographic evidence:

    I found a mangled rabbit in the back yard the other day... my first thought was fox but I think there was too much meat left on the bones. More likely one of the neighborhood cats fooling around. Hopefully the other rabbits get the hint (there are so many around this year).

    I also saw two different mantises yesterday on my potato plants. Its the first that I've seen them since releasing (admittedly I haven't really looked specifically for them, these ones just caught my eye).

    One was eating what looked like a small gnat. Both of them had probably tripled in size - they were about 1 1/2 inches long.

    Crappy video - I think it takes youtube a while to get HD:

    I continue to procrastinate on fertilizing the garden... missed a chance to incorporate some dry material yesterday (we got a nice drenching rain last night). Tomatoes could probably use it. A good bit of my onions look like they are starting to bulb up...should I try to feed them one more time or let them go?

    My peppers just look like they are asking for the warmer weather to start and the soil to dry up a bit.

    ETA - My 4 y.o. son was pulling out some new books last night for us to read together and guess what his favorite one was? --- Veggie Tales - God Loves Us All!

  • Sunflowers
    5 years ago

    Cool nature photos babushka and Peter! I haven't seen any foxes around my house but my parents have. We have a few feral cats that roam the neighborhood, but that's about it. Oh, but we do have a family of Robins with a nest about a foot outside our back door! I take a picture a day of the babies, and they're growing so fast! I bet they'll be opening their eyes soon.


  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Cool pictures of the Robin babies Sunflowers! Watch out for the mama because they can be very protective and go all Alfred Hitchcock's Birds on you if you're not careful.

    Kevin - My son loved Veggie Tales books and videos as a kid too. Gotta love Silly songs with Larry! I stop feeding my onions when I see signs of bulbing because at that point the energy in the leaves is being absorbed into the bulbs. Mine started bulbing about a week ago. If yours are long day onions it might be OK to feed them lightly one more time.

    isgen - I totally forgot all about cucumbers in my fall salad. My May planted cucumbers are toast by mid August but I might try to find somewhere to plant a couple in late June so I can have some in our fall salads this year. Thanks for the reminder!

  • Dawson North TX (z8a/7b)
    5 years ago

    Great looking stuff everyone! love the pictures of the wildlife!

    @Jack, 60 lbs is a lot! I envy you with all of that lettuce, I love homegrown lettuce but I can't be growing that stuff now.

    @isgen, all of those radishes look beautiful. Looks like you've got a lot of them on your hands!

    I picked my first Sun Gold tomatoes the other day and the first of my Cherry Bomb tomatoes are beginning to blush. I also have some green Cherokee Purple tomatoes that are as big as my fist! Can hardly wait for those! Been also Harvesting lots of green beans. My cucumbers are beginning to climb (I've never grown them on a trellis before, so it is pretty cool watching them climb) and grow a foot a day. I transplanted some winter squash out today in a place where I have room which is exciting (never grown them before). Not a vegetable, but my Kumquat tree is beginning to bloom and the blossoms smell amazing, kind of like jasmine. I also have harvested a total of just over 20 lbs of produce this year from about 100 sq of planting space and expecting this number to climb a lot in a few weeks when my warm season crops really get going. I am also testing the water with Micro Greens, I received some seed and flats for them today.