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rococogurl

Crate & Barrel has linen sheets on sale

rococogurl
5 years ago

Just saw the latest C&B catalog and was surprised to see linen sheet sets on sale $199.

Belgian linen, made in India they say.

Comments (33)

  • Compumom
    5 years ago

    Please educate me. I have seen linen sheets mentioned here, but I don't find linen all that soft and it certainly wrinkles like crazy. What's the reasoning behind linen sheets?

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  • practigal
    5 years ago

    Thank you so much rococogurl. I really appreciate the insight.

  • friedajune
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    If only these companies put the amount of energy and effort that they are expending on the new trend of linen sheets into instead bringing back the Wamsutta percale cotton sheets they stopped making about 20 years ago. Why can't they do that instead? Why are all these companies starting to make or distribute linen sheets when all I want is a good cotton percale? Why is a good cotton sheet like the old Wamsuttas as elusive as the Holy Grail? (And no, I am not going to pay $375+/sheet for Sferra, and, the Sferras aren't as good as they used to be either.).

    Had to get that rant out.

  • Compumom
    5 years ago

    Jane, thank you for your thorough and concise education on linen sheets. I'll check them out at C&B, however I'm not planning on making a purchase. I'm in agreement with Friedajune, bring back the good stuff from 20+ years ago!


  • mamapinky0
    5 years ago

    Personally I don't like linen sheets, my daughter likes them. I much prefer the good old fashioned cotton percale sheets, you know, the ones impossiable to find lol.

    I did see Targets Threshold has a 50/50 linen/cotton sheet set that felt sooo much nicer than pure linen. I didn't buy. I mention them in case someone's looking for the cotton linen blend in a lower price point.

  • rococogurl
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Wamsutta and American made cotton percale is over. The manufacturing of cotton sheets is nearly extinct in the US and the one mill, in Georgia, is Pakistani owned.

    It's a shame because American cotton is the best and, agreed, those were the best sheets. Sturdy, no nonsense, lovely percale.

    It is hit and miss today with percale sheets. I'm not a fan of the Target sheets I bought. I've had excellent luck with Sferra -- which I only buy on eBay or from their warehouse sales -- and anyone that pays crazy prices isn't shopping on eBay for sure.

    Here's the thing, though. Everyone has their own idea of what they like. My taste in percale may not be someone else's. Italy should be making the best sheeting -- they have the reputation. But sheets are only as good as the cotton. None of us know where that's coming from no matter what they say.

    There is no one solution and brands have various levels so not even a brand is reliable either. Plus, no manufacturing standards, no disclosure, no guarantees.

    If I had to buy a set of percale sheets today it would be tough. There are too many choices but not enough sure ones. I favor my tried & true places like Cuddledown and perfectlinens.com and I only buy on sale.

    But there have been some very interesting sources discussed here over the past year including boutique Canadian brands and more commercial places like The Company Store.

    Guess we just all need to check on return policy before ordering or pick up things at a discount and see how they wash. The real answer may turn out to be bookmarks.

  • mamapinky0
    5 years ago

    I also want to add that when sheets carry the label 100% Egyption cotton..that means nothing. Any sheet made with cotton from Egypt can carry that label. They grow quality cotton and they grow poor quality cotton. So the label is worthless as those $$$ 100% Egyptian cotton sheets could be made with poor quality cotton.

    Roc knows and understands cotton and linen sheets better than most.

  • Pyewacket
    5 years ago

    How are they "Belgian" linen if they are being made in India?

    I've had an awful time finding decent sheets that don't cost the earth. On several occasions, I have paid premium prices for sheets only to have them fall apart in nothing flat, or take stains, or wear oddly.

    The biggest complaint I have is that permanent press seems to be a thing of the past. I am SO tired of buying clothes or sheets only to have them come out of the first wash a wrinkled mess. Like they'd been wadded up and sat on to set the creases.

    And what's with the COLORS available for the past several years - or decades? Dull, drab, boring. Dingy greys and browns. Sage instead of bright green. Dusty blue instead of sky blue. I found ONE set of coral sheets recently and can't even remember where I bought them now - but it was the ONLY bright color available anyway, so knowing where they came from is not that useful given there weren't any other non-dingy colors available anyway, LOL!

  • mamapinky0
    5 years ago

    I think you must be the only person I've heard of that likes synthetic sheets.

    As far as wrinkling..that's what linen and cotton do, always have.

  • rococogurl
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    If the flax is grown and harvested in Belgium, a leading producer, and the sheets are woven and sewn in India, that is how it is Belgian linen. It's no different than Egyptian cotton sheets manufactured in Italy or Portugal.

  • Miranda33
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Zensojourner - the thing that makes "permanent press" not wrinkle is the addition of formaldehyde to the fabric. Formaldehyde, which also preserves dead remains, is what keeps those permanent press sheets smooth. You are seeing fewer permanent press sheets in the market because regulations have become more stringent about these chemicals in the factories. The NYT article I link below talks about contact dermatitis. But formaldehyde is a known carcinogen in larger doses as would be found in factories that use it.

    So no thanks, I'll have wrinkled sheets please.

    NYTimes Article about Formaldehyde in Fabrics and Contact Dermatitis

    Cancer.gov Article about Formaldehyde

  • Pyewacket
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    @Miranda33

    Please do not throw psuedo-science at me. Permanent press does not cause cancer and if it caused contact dermatitis in ANYBODY, it certainly was not me or anyone I have ever known. Given that *I* personally DO have a contact dermatitis issue - with something in cheap liquid handsoap - I acknowledge that a minority of people are ALWAYS going to have issues with contact dermatitis due to substances that do not bother the majority in the slightest.

    In point of fact, the feds did testing of clothing just recently, and found that formaldehyde levels in clothing has DECREASED over the past 30 years. And yes, some people are allergic to it - so those people should avoid it.

    However some people are allergic to any number of substances - say. peanuts. Yet we have not banned peanuts.

    I want permanent press. I do not care if it has formaldehyde in it. If it were actually "dangerous" as you think, they would have banned it or at least made some resolution to limit its use. They didn't do that - because it is not necessary.

    The ACTUAL science involved shows the cancer risk you are fearful of is from AIRBORNE formaldehyde. There is no airborne formaldehyde risk from the little bit of formaldehyde that may be left in a permanent press fabric.

    "Wakelyn makes the point that the worry over formaldehyde in clothes may
    come from recent reports on the potential risk of cancer from airborne
    exposure to formaldehyde. “The risk from formaldehyde from airborne
    exposure is not the same” as the risk involved with clothes, he tells
    C&EN. Today, almost no formaldehyde is released into the air from
    treated fabrics, and, Wakelyn says, very little is transferred from the
    fabric to the skin. “What is transferred reacts with the outer layers of
    the skin and does not penetrate into the body.”"

    The study goes on to report that formaldehyde levels in all clothing tested - nearly 200 different items - were much lower than levels even in chemical-fearing EU. 20% measured as undetectable.

    I'm not afraid of permanent press. Bring it on!

  • Pyewacket
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    @mamapinky0 - where did I say I like synthetic sheets? I said I like bright colors and PERMANENT PRESS. Permanent press is a fabric TREATMENT, has nothing to do with "synthetic" or not.

    I wouldn't touch a linen sheet with a ten foot pole. I don't want the wrinkles. Having grown up in an era when permanent press was not common, and having to get up at 5 AM to iron my father's shirts, I want permanent press. I will never iron again. I have ironed quite enough in my lifetime. If a textile meant to be worn or used as bed linens is not permanent press, I flat out do not want it.

  • rococogurl
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Bright color sheets are available at The Country Store and at Cuddledown.

    They won't be permanent press.

    Surely in this wide world there is a satisfactory alternative that isn't a cause for anger. Life is too short.

    My sheets are ironed and I love that. Don't mind spending an hour doing it. Everyone has their likes/dislikes around here and we try to be tolerant of each other.

    Many are interested in linen sheets, as they are very durable. Mine are quite heavy and wrinkle less than the cotton, actually.

  • Sherry
    5 years ago

    I like 60% cotton-40% polyester percale sheets made in the 70 and 80's. They were made in the USA of USA cotton. Cool, crisp, and no iron. Ihave had some of the all cotton and did not like them.

  • practigal
    5 years ago

    Rocicogirl do use a regular iron or a larger rotary iron? I use a regular iron the pillow cases and sometimes the top of the flat sheet but I don't iron the fitted or most of the flat sheet. If I had a rotary iron I would do more....

  • Miranda33
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Zensojourner - I did not mean to make you so upset. I stand by my warning of formaldehyde in sheets, as well as what is described in the cancer.gov site I linked. I never said permanent press causes cancer. I mentioned that the more stringent regulations have been put in place due to concern about the workers in the factories where formaldehyde is applied to fabrics. You stated you don't care if permanent press has formaldehyde in it. I stated that my preference is wrinkles in my sheets. IMO, that should not be a trigger for your anger because you feel differently. This forum is meant to allow all opinions Zensojourner.

  • mamapinky0
    5 years ago

    When I think of perm press I think automatically polyester, rayon, and like man made fibers. Fibers that don't breath and are water resistant. Sorry Zen.






  • rococogurl
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    @practigal - depends on my mood. I have rotary which makes quick work of pillow cases. My sheets are king so, while the rotary is faster it is more cumbersome actually. But I don't iron down creases in the sheets so I expect that makes it more challenging.

    I iron the flat part of the fitted sheets but not the sides. These can be run through the rotary that way but I try to keep the elastic away from the heat.

    It takes about an hour to hand-iron a king set and about 30 minutes on the rotary. I set the ironing board up in the TV room for laundry theater.

  • mamapinky0
    5 years ago

    Miranda, I don't see where you have a reason to apologize to anyone. You brought up a interesting topic and stated your opinion in a respectful manner. Personally I share your feeling on these formaldehyde treated sheets. I sure wouldn't be tucking my grands in bed at night in these. But I prefer the good old wrinkled sheets and a steam iron. LOL.

  • Miranda33
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Thank you Mamapinky, that is very kind of you to say.

  • pat leopold
    5 years ago

    The percale sheets of 20-30 years ago were a cotton/poly blend either 50/50 or 60/40. This is what made them relatively wrinkle free out of the dryer. (No extra chemicals involved) Purchased many sets of these from Springmaid employee store since I lived close to where these were made and hubby worked for Springmaid. The weaving process made them percale. Percale does not refer to composition or non wrinkling.

    I remember when my mom bought me an expensive set of all cotton sheets in the mid 80;s(2.5x price of Springmaid sheets) I was so disappointed with the wrinkling that I threw them away after 2nd wash. Now everyone is into all cotton and complain about wrinkling. Unfortunately that is what cotton does. Blend sheets are hard to find. They are available and are very inexpensive ( $30-40 for King size set). Everyone seems to think that the more they spend the better the sheet. This is not always the case.

    Since American millls have closed not sure if cotton/polys made outside US are equal to old style in quality. I wish I had those sheets still but got rid of them because they would not fit the thicker mattress I purchased in 2005. Some of those sheets were from the 60's and other than elastic failures on fitted sheets looked brand new. Colors were still vibrant. Had 2 sets of the Ralph Lauren designed sheets with the Large red/pink cabbage roses and lots of green leaves that were advertised heavily in Vogue and other upscale mags at the time. Loved, loved those sheets. Never wrinkled and were 50cotton 50 poly.

    I still have Springmaid towels that were wedding gifts in 1966. Use them constantly in my pet beds and they also after washing look new. The velvet texture on one side has no snags from my cat's claws after 20+ years of lining their beds.

  • enduring
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I love 100% cotton, no exceptions. Always have. I've slept on many sheets over the decades. Nothing beats 100% cotton percale. Wrinkles don't bother me, also I can put them through a mangle.

    When I was young, on hot sultry nights, without air conditioning, there was nothing like a wet and rung out top sheet, in 100% cotton percale, to cool down, after a hot muggy day in the hot humid upper Midwest summer. Are there too many comas, Rococo? Lol.

  • mamapinky0
    5 years ago

    Springmaid also made 100% cotton percale USA made. Yes they needed ironed. I do not like cotton/poly blends. They may not need ironed but they don't feel the same as the old USA made cotton sheets.

    Its my experience that the cotton poly blend sheets in todays market can be found on the cheap everywhere and frankly I wouldn't want them for any price. They feel like the synthetic they are made of, they hold soil and odors, and they pill. Was yesteryears like this? I've always used all cotton, but I iron mine and have no problem ironing. I would be the last to complain about cotton wrinkling LOL. Of course it wrinkles. This is why grandma and mom took them off the line and ironed them.

  • rococogurl
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    I had some fancy cotton/poly sheets in the 80s. They were from a French designer but not sure where they were made. At the time they were the only silver gray sheets anywhere. I also had a floral pattern and I still have the duvet, a sheet and a couple of pillowcases. Some of the pieces wore out though. But they dont feel the same way Italian cotton or the linen do after a lot of laundering.

    Commas are helpful @enduring. I always like many.

    One nice thing about the linen sheets is that i can fold them and air dry them. They come out very smooth. Fairly amazing. Cotton doesnt do that

  • mamapinky0
    5 years ago

    Is the * commas* an inside joke?

  • rococogurl
    Original Author
    5 years ago

    No inside jokes here. Right here on the thread.

  • mamapinky0
    5 years ago

    Lol Roc I just wondered as I know I use commas where I shouldn't and don't when I should,,, sometimes i use multipal commas.

  • rococogurl
    Original Author
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Guess @enduring throught she used too many perhaps. I do it all the time. On my blog there's this rating for readability-- must be an algorithm. I always get a red dot, meaning bad readability. I am clearly guilty of too many commas.

  • enduring
    5 years ago

    Lol to you both. I thought Rococo was an editor in a previous life. I need comas, but a well edited sentence could be shorter than those I posted :)

  • mamapinky0
    5 years ago

    LOl Enduring...Roc isn't fooling us...she is brilliant with editing,,,,,, I can barely remember the difference between a , & a .

  • woodcrazy
    5 years ago

    i maybe in the minority here but i LOVE 100% linen sheets. i like the texture and wrinkles :) mine are heavyweights and i'm always afraid my poor old front load will break from the wet weight. use them year round and added silk pillowcases to make a perfect sleep space (for me).