SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
Houzz Logo Print
lizardjam

What pepper is this?

My seedling labels got a little mixed up and I have a bunch of pepper plants with no labels. I planted Caribbean reds, Thai chilis, reapers, scorpions...I know this isn't a scorpion or reaper but do you think it's a Thai or Caribbean red? In wondering if I should pick it before it's red if it will even get there...? Any advice is welcome and appreciated.

On another note something is eating every single pepper plant! I'd like to say it's purely cosmetic but on the jalapeno it's really taking it down.

Comments (35)

  • esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    The closed that plant is to any on your list is maybe a Thai chili. But, most of the Thai varieties that I am familiar with grow their pods upright and in clusters. That plant looks more like a common Cayenne than anything else.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I just remembered I also planted pinata peppers. Maybe one of those?

  • esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
    6 years ago

    From what i can tell, Pinata peppers are shaped more like Jalapenos than that.

  • aniajs
    6 years ago

    I'm growing a pepper called Pinata, and it is a cayenne, and it looks a lot like yours. So it could be that. Here's what mine look like (sorry for the blurriness; it's pushing 100F outside right now so my time outside is necessarily brief). If you look at the shape of the fruit it's similar.


    And here's the packet from which the seeds came:

    Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus thanked aniajs
  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    That's the exact packet I had. Probably one of those! Thank you for the picture! I hope mine turn a color! I have enough green peppers.


    It was odd because the Thai chilis germinated at such a high rate I thought for sure I'd get those but they tend to point upwards eh? I think I have one of those growing. I'll have to check. I had many a seedling die around Easter because not all got the benefit of hardening off.

  • esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
    6 years ago

    I think aniajs might have your match.

  • aniajs
    6 years ago

    It'll definitely turn color... the question is to what? Package says equally mixed seeds from red, yellow, purple, and orange cayenne varieties, but since they didn't mark the seeds there was no way to tell which was which when I started them. So we'll see what happens. The nice thing about cayennes is that they grow relatively fast for peppers and there are always several on the plant in various stages of development so you'll be able to see what they look in multiple stages of development.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I can't wait. I have so many peppers finally fruiting so I can finally see what made it. Thank you for the comments!

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I think I found the Thai then..

  • esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
    6 years ago

    That is looking very Thai like.

  • jakartadean
    6 years ago

    FWIW, I purchased a couple of Thai Dragon seedlings this year from a company called BloomIQ as well as some Thai Dragon seeds from West Coast Seeds (I'm in Canada). The former are already two feet tall, and have lots of fruit 4-5" long pointing downwards. Nothing from the West Coast plants yet, but the package they point upwards on plants only 16" tall. It would be nice if all could agree on what we're growing!

  • esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
    6 years ago

    Welcome to the world of peppers. Hybrids, crosses, unstable strains, mis-named, mis-labeled, mis-represented all add to the confusion. Best thing to do is go to some of the more reputable sites and look up the pepper in question.

    I am growing some Sweet Banana Peppers, Hot Banana Peppers and Hot Hungarian Wax Peppers and all three of those are very commonly confused but are three distinct cultivars.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I'm really looking forward to the white ghosts! I was worried about getting the wrong seeds from any number of them but, mostly my fault at this point for not labeling properly once the seeds sprouted!

  • esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
    6 years ago

    Been there done that. I have mixed up my plants when sowing the seed or mixed up the labels when transplanting or what have you. I have learned to take special care when planting or moving my plants from one container to another to make sure I move the marker as well right away.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I had 2 seedlings and I have no idea what they were. It didn't look like any of the others. They were peppers but nothing like the rest. They had round first leaves and a thick bright green stem. Unfortunately neither made it.

  • esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
    6 years ago

    Any chance they were not even peppers. Every pepper I have grown has the long willow leaf looking cotyledon (First) leaves.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    They certainly could have been something else. I got the seeds all over, Amazon, peppersbymail.com, osh... This is my first year growing anything from seed and because of easter I had to move a lot of the seedlings outside before fully hardening them off. Luckily I still have a bunch producing peppers right now.

  • esox07 (4b) Wisconsin
    6 years ago

    Kelly, be very careful where you buy seeds. Amazon and Ebay are complete crap shoots. Maybe 50/50 at best. Make sure if you go with an online website, that it is well known and reputable. But, probably one of your best sources is other list members. They won't rip you off intentionally, but you still may get a mis-labeled, crossed or mis-named seed. A lot of member will trade and many will send you seeds if you just provide them with a SASE. Also, each fall one or two members will form up a Seed Swap where members can send in whatever they have and the organizer will sort them and distribute them to the other members. You will get many of the varieties back that you want, but not always all of them. Most of the time, there is not a minimum amount of seed you have to send in. Just save some seed from your plants this summer and send them in.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    That sounds like a lot of fun. I definitely want to grow more peppers next year. Preferably some of the hots that failed on me this year. I will definitely watch where I buy from going forward. I do like peppers by mail. So far though I've only gotten jalaps and white ghost from them. The white ghost have yet to fruit so no validation there yet but good germination and growth thus far!


    I will have to keep the seed swap in mind and dry out some seeds. I doubt many will want the simple jalapie!

  • MikeUSMC
    6 years ago

    Kelly,

    I've never had any interaction with the guy from peppersbymail.com personally, but he IS a well respected member on the "THP" pepper forum. I'd say you're safe, but probably dodged a bullet. Like Bruce said, stay away from eBay and Amazon for seeds.

  • aniajs
    6 years ago

    Hi Kelly. I'm just curious what color piñata pepper yours ended up being. Mine looks to be yellow.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    They're still green. All my peppers are except my habaneros. Go figure. I'll udpate as soon as they color. My thai chilis are all green too.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Looks like the Thai and the pinata are going red.

  • woohooman San Diego CA zone 10a
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Not sure what variety. Burpee is a pretty safe bet to have pure seed, so I'm sure it's a pinata.

    I want to address this statement though... "On another note something is eating every single pepper plant! I'd like
    to say it's purely cosmetic but on the jalapeno it's really taking it
    down."

    Probably honworms. They blend into the foliage very well, so inspect closely, Hand pick and squish or drop into some soapy water. Also, go get some Bt(k variant) and spray every 2 weeks. Completely safe, cheap, and available at any garden center.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I've tried neem, spinosad, soap water. I actually found a giant (ok to me it was the biggest garden pest I'd ever seen) horn worm on my cherry tomato plant in a container. On most of my peppers though it looks like leaf miners. So very hard to keep away, if at all! I haven't seen any pests oddly enough on my cherry tomatoes plants in the raised bed. It's the same raised need as a lot of eaten peppers too. I just want something to decimate those miners. My pepper leaves look horrible. It's every single pepper plant too. None have been spared, no matter the location in my garden.

    The worm. He had his own feasting branch. My daughter wanted him as a "pet", so he's in her pink bucket.

  • woohooman San Diego CA zone 10a
    6 years ago

    Leafminers are mainly cosmetic and using spinosad to try to control them usually will kill off the natural predators that you'll end up with a bigger problem than what you currently have. I've learned to live with the cosmetic damage they cause and plant plants that will attract the good insects. The hornworms, on the other hand, won't kill a plant, but will strip so much foliage that the fruit themselves will have little shade to protect them from getting sunscald.


    Kevin

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Thanks. I keep reading about the miners being cosmetic but they're seriously killing so many leaves the whole plant starts to just lose them all. There's really nothing else wrong but the miners. It's very concerning. The few leaves that have holes on somesome plants are few and far between. Seems the miners are the main pest in my garden.

  • woohooman San Diego CA zone 10a
    6 years ago

    I'm not saying you don't have a serious miner problem, but I've had them very bad before and I've had serious leaf loss before, and never did I correlate the 2 together.


    Imho, your serious leaf loss is from the hornworms, some other pest than miners such as whitefly, a psyllid, mites, etc that is sucking the life out of your plants or transmitting disease. Overwatering can cause leaf loss also. May I ask where in California you're located?

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I'm in Anaheim. I try not to over water because I've heard so many bad things about it. I check the moisture level and the leaf damage is apt the same whether in the raised bed or the pots. I'll find a picture.

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    The pinata or Caribbean peppers ate ask turning out nicely. However I just realized looking back at my original post that almost all leaves are gone. Not sure why.

  • woohooman San Diego CA zone 10a
    6 years ago

    Well, are the leaves falling on the ground or just gone?

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Looks like they're shriveled in the pot. Probably didn't water it like I should have. I try to get to the garden every other day at least. I don't have a set watering system. Could have been that. Not sure. I check each one when I go out. Maybe missed it.


  • woohooman San Diego CA zone 10a
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    ok. So, I'm still not ruling out hornworms caused "some" of the damage, but it sounds like there's more blame to go around. Overwatering can cause "some" leaf loss but usually not so much without the rest of the plant suffering also.

    Let's go on to underwatering and heat. With the extreme temps we've been having in SoCal, underwatering can be an issue for leaf loss. The best way to tell if you have sufficient water is the plants will wilt during the heat of the day, but when cooler temps arrive in the evening, the plant will rebound. But, you can still lose a lot of foliage even with sufficient watering if the plant and pot get just too hot. There are several ways to remedy this---

    1) Direct sun in the morns and evening but dappled sunlight or shade during the middle of the day.

    2) Mulch

    3) shade cloth

    4) shading that BLACK pot(cardboard, white trash bags, plywood, etc)

    Onto other culprits, but not limited

    1) Whiteflies, aphids, mites, Tomato Suck Bugs(all very common in So Cal gardens) and other sucking insects

    2) Disease

    Hope this helps some.

    Kevin

  • Kelly(zone 10a, California) GrowingCitrus
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Thank you Kevin. Most of the pots are in full sun all day, and are black. I hadn't thought of shielding those. Few have shown sunburn but they look to be getting used to it. From your list, I'm thinking under watering and pests. I sure hope not disease! The peppers and tomatoes don't show signs of disease but maybe it could be restricted to the leaves?

Sponsored
Van Metre Homes
Average rating: 4.2 out of 5 stars18 Reviews
Loudoun County's Leading Home Builder | 5x Best of Houzz