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bigdoglover

Are rub-through distress marks on cabinets are overdone/passe'?

bigdoglover
12 years ago

First, I know and totally agree that what we like is the important thing. And when it comes to furniture, colors and prints, I'm not concerned about what's in style.

Still, I'd like to know what others think on this, because part of what I like is not paying to have my brand new cabinets painted in a passe' fashion, no matter how much I like the distressed look, lol! :-) As much as I don't like to admit it, I'm concerned with resale, should that occur at some point.

I'm talking about creamy white cabinets, raised panel doors and drawers, hood with shelf and corbels, etc. -- totally traditional. No glazing, though I love it, but we are having to keep everything nice and light in this kitchen. But I have a sample that has a few areas randomly rubbed through almost to the bare wood and I really like the look that it may have been around for a couple hundred years, especially since I'm completely immersed in 18th century furnishings and forms. The finisher also says it serves to hide or distract from any little imperfections that will otherwise show up in a straight white cabinet that has not been glazed.

What do you think? Overdone? Passe'? Or not?

Thanks much!

bigdoglover

Comments (41)

  • Missy Benton
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    When I was selecting my cabinets my husband really liked the the distressed look. He also liked glaze. I don't like it for my kitchen, but in the right kitchen I find it charming. However, I wanted to convince my DH that it wasn't the right decision for us and so I asked the KD whether it was a trend on the way out. He said that for the last 10 years everyone ordered the distressed look but for the last year hardly anyone has. That sold my husband because he does worry too much about resale. That said, if distressed was my favorite look I'd still do it, no matter what the trend is. No matter what you choose, it's going to need freshened up in 10 years or so. I think it's worthless to stress yourself out trying to create something that's timeless because it's impossible, IMHO. Good luck with whatever you choose.

  • clubcracker
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Are the cabinets paintable in the future? If so I'd go with what you love and figure you'll have to paint them before you sell anyway, unless you're planning to sell in the next 5 years or so, in which case a good scrubbing and touch up will probably suffice?

    Mary

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  • brianadarnell
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    If you like it, you should do it. I really really liked the look of distressed and/or glazed in other's houses/kitchens, etc. When it came time to order my cabinets, I ordered them creamy white. I'm so glad I did. If I ever want glazing, it would be easier to add than to remove (ie. repainting the cabs).

    Hope that helps!

  • live_wire_oak
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Fad or not, it's always been a poor choice to put in almost every home except a 1890 cabin in which the rest of the home is equally worn. Even then, do you think your great grandparents would want to showcase such wear? They'd be horrified and rush to repair and paint so that everything looked presentable.

    The cabinets should fit the home that they are placed in and you'll get distressing soon enough if you have kids. If you don't, then borrow a few neighbor kids and let them play hockey and you'll get the look free of charge.

  • liriodendron
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    This is just my opinion, but I think all faux "effects" have a much shorter shelf-life than otherwise. And also are more recognizably attached to a time period. And definitely NOT the "original" time period!

    I think the rubs marks are there to (try to) imply a sense of "authenticity", as if the cabs might be genuine antiques salvaged from an older house. And then in keeping with antique collectors' notions of "original finishes" being more desirable than refinished surfaces, left in their well-worn state.

    Except ...... Cabs, as we know them, didn't really exist in authentic 18th/19th c houses. Individual case pieces did and those pieces were usually highly prized. In mid-economic level houses they would have been kept clean and washed and painted and polished and cared for, as needed. In wealthier households, no one would have allowed the service areas to become delapidated, either.

    The only real examples of authentic "distressed-looking" stuff would come from furniture that had been discarded and progressed (in desirability) downward to being used as storage in chicken coops and barns.

    There are some decorative effects that don't fall into this problem (very narrow lines at the intersections of moulding profiles to deepen and enhance the shadow lines, for instance) but that is completely different from faked "evidence" of wear.

    To me the faux distressed finishes amount to paying extra to imitate the look of case pieces that had been discarded as trash by their orginal owners. Sort of like deliberately damaging your new car's finish so it would look like the junker your parents drove in college.

    Worn edges on painted case pieces in farmhouses would have been considered a sign of economic failure and the "fly specks" you pay extra for would have been considered evidence of slatternly housekeeping.

    I suppose in the future some stylist will be gaga over grungey looking tile-grout and the chipped corners of plastic-laminate covered IKEA furniture. If you have the space, store your old stuff as an investment - you could make a killing!

    L.

  • pharaoh
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    They have the problem as with other 'instant' things - instant coffee, instant wealth, instant patina, purposely distressed floors/cabinets/furniture, they look forced and fake.

  • jgopp
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I feel like I should chime in on this discussion as I have worn cabinetry in my kitchen. I am going to agree with motodetroit above and say it is the moderation being the key to pulling off this look. For example the link below shows an extreme variation of the distressed look which I find to be hideous, it looks like the home has been through a fire.

    Now not to toot my own horn, but I think my kitchen has achieved just the right amount of distressing for my tastes. I think your designer was suggesting that distressing is being less ordered in the traditional sense, meaning no longer black cabinetry with gold accenting and distressing on all edges.

    Most people come into my home and immediately think my kitchen is all white. It is only after being in the house a few times do people actually recognize they are slightly distressed. I usually get the "oh! so THAT is how they feel so warm compared to others". If you stand about 5 feet back from my cabinets they look all white but they give off a warm tone due to the edge distressing.

    I think it can look great still and I believe it has lasting value. The thing is you'll see trends come and go in magazines but it isn't always the stuff people are actually putting in their own homes in general. They need to always have an "updated" look to sell you that magazine. My home was on the kitchen tour in my area and I was the only true white kitchen, contrary to popular belief that everyone is doing white. Most kitchens were stained wood or a glaze of some type.

    Here is a picture of some of my cabinetry..

    Here is a link that might be useful:

  • Billl
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    IMO, it is like paying big bucks for a pair of ripped jeans.

  • kompy
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    jgopp, nice job on your distressed cabinets! What brand are they?

    I have done several Plain & Fancy Arctic Distressed kitchens for people, and I agree with you...at first glance, the markings are so subtle, people don't realize the distressing. P&F's is subtle and the paint is very LOW SHEEN, so it doesn't jump out at you. You can't distress an enamel paint very well...it's usually a low sheen, primer kinda finish. There is definitely an art to distressing as well. Once, I had a cabinet maker try to replicate a P&F finish and it was horrible. He used enamel paint and it look chipped off, not worn.

    If not overdone, I think rub thru finishes can look great in any home.

    I have a stained cherry, distressed display in my showroom and it's gorgeous!!! Everyone wants it.

    Kompy

  • jgopp
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Kompy: They are fully custom for a local guy who does amazing work. Wouldn't have done it any other way. Thanks for the compliment! I linked you to my full kitchen album below, there are some more pictures of the cabinetry on there.

    Here is a link that might be useful: My finished kitchen

  • plllog
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    When my mother was offered distressing at an extra price some 40 years ago, she was very offended and said, "I have children for that!"

    You could just let your cabinets distress in place. You have big dogs, right?

  • kateskouros
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    jmo, but as a rule i'm not into "faux".
    my best friend grew up in a mansion. i'm not talking about a mc; i mean a REAL live, certifiable mansion. it was and still is the most beautiful home i've ever seen. the walls in the massive dining room were faux finished along with several of the bathrooms. fast forward (almost) 30 years and my son's best friend now lives in the home. crazy, right?
    anyway, i was there when the new owners had just purchased and omg, those walls had not been touched in ...30 or so years! and man, what i wouldn't give to have a can of paint and a brush in hand. i couldn't stand looking at them!
    thankfully, the home has been updated with fresh paint and no sign of faux anything in sight. thinking back on it, how silly was i to think "stone" painted walls actually looked good? and i was a design student! oh well, live and learn.

  • jgopp
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I'd like to throw in the angle that a lot of people have on this forum too... handscrapped floors that come prefinished in a distressed look are pretty popular. Is the logic the same with floors? Better to have a brand new floor with no imperfection and wait for it to patina over time?

  • marcolo
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I think one key phrase here is "18th century."

    I normally view distressing as smirk-worthy, but check out these kitchens:

    In an actual 1776 Cape, and done extremely well, not so bad, right?

    In a 1976 Cape, done poorly, an eye-gouging horror.

    {{gwi:1988605}}

    Quality of work makes a big difference. Like others here, I was brought up in a house where a kitchen remodeled in 1966 or 1974 still looked new decades later. However, I have a really cool dining table modeled after an actual English antique, and the wormholes and whatnot are done so well that it actually does appear to be 300 years old. Who knew?

  • writersblock (9b/10a)
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Just this afternoon in a big box store I saw a Kraftmaid display with pea green cabinets that looked kind of interesting. When I went up to it, I could see that on every corner of the raised door panels there was a dime sized area scuffed down to the wood. Identical. On every corner. Of every panel. On every door and drawer.

  • mtnrdredux_gw
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I like distressed things, I dislike faux distress. I also would never have distressed anything in my Brick Georgian colonial, even though it was a 1904 home, because it was very formal. My new home is what they call in CT "antique", and it is quite casual. The core of it was built for a farmer. My old house was built for a well to do button merchant and his Broadway actress wife. That difference informs many of my decisions.

    However, when I undertook our gut renovation, I started to worry about my cabinets. The Rutt cabinets in my Georgian home are about 9 years old, and the paint finish is almost perfect. I was looking at it one day and marvelling how very perfect it is .... almost as though it is not wood. No brush strokes. Automotive comes to mind (though not shiny).

    I panicked, imagining by new cabs in my new house looking so machine-perfect. They were custom made. So I asked my GC, how do I make them look handpainted? Can we (silly me) hand paint them? What they recommended was to use the nipso-bonzo painted finish they always use, then do a very light glaze so that you see some brushstrokes. And a teeny tiny bit of sanding on some edges. Plus I had chosen a very very light wavy restoration glass.

    No one in my kitchen has ever noticed that my cabs are distressed, glazed or even why my glass seems different. It is very very subtle. But to me, it was important. I did not want it to look like a McMansion kitchen was airlifted in.

    My two cents. It can be an important detail. But I think one should use a very very light hand. I will try to look for a photo that shows it, but it is hard to show.

  • holiday2525
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I agree with Liriodendron and live wire oak. I have never understood the idea of distressing furniture. Personally, I also think the glazing makes it look worse, often I see these glazed cabinets and all I want to do is that a sponge to them as the clearly need a good cleaning!!! (Not ALL glazed cabinets - just some, and I'm not sure why sometimes it looks good and sometimes it does not)

    That said, this is obviously a matter of taste. Get what you love and will make YOU happy. However, as you mention resale, get something that can be deglazed or undistressed if you find you must sell the house.

    New cabinets that look worn would be a non-starter for me as a house buyer.

  • bigdoglover
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Sorry I have not been able to get back here today until now, but all of your comments are extremely helpful -- so many good thoughts both pro and con, lots to think about. The conversation has made me conclude so far that not gratuitous markings, but very naturally-placed and subtle distressing is the way to go if I'm going to do this. I think since resale is the only reason I'd do or not do, and I myself would be happy buying either a solid, or a *properly* distressed kitchen, but others would be turned off by the distressing, that I will probably not do it. I enjoyed the photos of the beautiful ones, though -- thanks so much for the visuals motodetroit, jgopp (gorgeous!), and marcolo; and LOL the overly-distressed ones (oh my!) as well as the many pithy comments about distressed cabinets and furniture, and all the examples and intelligent analyses.

    I'm so grateful for each and every one of your perspectives, the points are all very well-taken, and I want to say again, thank you very much. What did we do before GW existed?

    Good night, time for bed after a long kitchen day.

  • jdesign_gw
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    First it has to fit the house. That's obvious. Second, and most important, it has to be done very well. Not some contrived "would not occur in nature" kind of thing. There is nothing worse. I've only seen a few pull it off well. Remember, there's a fine line between distressed and damaged.
    John

  • gr8daygw
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    In our area it is mostly over. I don't see it much anymore and the kitchens that do have it speak to a time when it was popular.

  • mtnrdredux_gw
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    It is pretty hard to show you the distress in my kitchen via photos. My main intent was to "knock down the newness". My cabs have wavy glass, glazing inside and out, and very light distressing on the edges.

    I don't think you can see it at all in these photos, but that alone may be instructive as you consider your options. It might beg the question "why do it" but I think if it were pointed out to you in person it would make sense. At least I hope so!

    Long view{{gwi:1875471}}

    Medium range{{gwi:1875473}}

    Two close ups{{gwi:1875474}}{{gwi:1619617}}

  • cloudbase
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I was at a furniture an appliance store that, in their reception area, had black cabinets with a rub-through distressing. I thought it looked kinda neat until I realized that every single cabinet door was "distressed" in exactly the same spot, in exactly the same amount. Sort of like seeing a note that looks handwritten, until you realize every "a" is written exactly the same way and it was just a handwriting-looking computer font.

    So, if you're having a custom cabinetmaker do the work, and it really fits your kitchen, go for it. But if you're ordering that finish on factory-made cabinets, DON'T DO IT. It will be obvious and disappointing.

    My 2 cents.

  • bigdoglover
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    mtnrdredux, I love your warm inviting kitchen. I can see the "wear" just a hair, and see what you mean, it softens it, very lovely. You'd better get your mop out, I'm drooling over your floors! Ooolala they are so warm and rich. Heart pine?

    jdesign, and cloudbase well-said. These are being custom finished so they won't have the "printed" look. It's so sad but the ludicrousness of it makes me laugh.

    I'm realizing it takes someone who is very artistic to do this right.

    Hi gr8day, thanks for that info, which I suspected. I had French dry-brushed glaze on the cabinets in our old house about 8 years ago. Loved it, but had decided not to go with that here because of wanting a lighter effect. I was hoping the worn would be less passe' and I think it will not go out of style, as long as it's done like mtnrdredux's and the other subtle ones on this thread.

  • mtnrdredux_gw
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Thanks, Bigdoglover. The floors are Carlisle wide plank random width Eastern White Pine. We love them, though they are very soft and scratch up easily. YOu don't need to pay an artisan to distress them!

    Good luck and Id love to see what you decide to do!

  • PeterH2
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    "resale is the only reason I'd do or not do [...] others would be turned off by the distressing"

    You have hit the nail on the head.

    I have a strong dislike of most of the distressing that I see. Brown glazes on white cabinets make my skin crawl, because they remind me of really nasty gas station restrooms. Obvious distressing or glaze would be enough to make me not buy a house unless I could afford to replace of refinish the kitchen immediately. I doubt you would find anyone who would refuse to buy your house because of a lack of distressing.

  • Tim
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Faux finishes of any kind IMHO are fad in nature, regardless of how short or long the fad might last. Stick with the basics and let your kitchen earn some natural patina. Just noticed a spaghetti sauce stain on the marble counters in our 6 month old kitchen. No biggie. Not the first and not the last.

    BTW - love the sliding doors on the kitchen above - great set of cabinets. Not sure what 'distressing' you've done on them but it looks super subtle and would be the only exception I've seen to my 'no fake distressing' diatribe.

  • cheri127
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    First, I don't think there's anything forced or fake about instant wealth. Who the heck would throw away a winning lottery ticket?!

    But back to distressed cabinets. If the rest of your home is decorated with 18th century style furniture (that looks like it's been used for 300 years) then I think lightly distressed cabinets would fit right in, even more so if you're house is an old one. What age and style is it?

  • jdesign_gw
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Like I said in the right house it's not out. I have a one word answer to all that say it is. Chalon. (chalon google images if you don't know) I've built a few of their islands and I can tell you that this is one of the hardest kitchens to copy. Their signature chipped paint finish gave me many sleepless nights until I figured it out. They are also one of the most expensive cabinets out there. They offer 5 levels of distressing. I don't like their super distress stuff but in the right setting the mild distress finish on their style of cabinets can be a real comfortable kitchen to live with.
    John

  • bigdoglover
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Peter -- I seriously wonder if that's why our last house with gorgeously (to me anyway) cocoa colored French drybrushed white cabinets took so long to sell. Of course the housing bubble bursting right about that time didn't help.

    cheri, sorry to say we weren't able to get an 18C style house when we moved, though we've been fortunate to have them three times previously. This was a builder spec house, it's almost five years old, traditional enough, two-stories but rather assymetrical and more transitional. I had two weeks to find a house, we bought this one for the location and lot. I hated all the colors they used, and we've done everything possible to change that and put 18C into it. Other than a few furniture pieces that truly are from the 18C and show it, our 18C reproductions are not distressed, though they have some normal wear by now. So i can't honestly say that the kitchen surroundings call for distressed cabinets.

    jdesign, those are very special kitchens, just delicious! Makes me think of going from white to some color. I based my last kitchen and this one somewhat, on a couple kitchens in the Downsview Kitchen catalog, also pricey (English).

    TTim, I suppose you're right about faux/fad, but it was awfully fun to have faux finished walls last house. I'm over that now. But do you see any difference between faux finishing a wall to your liking, and putting up wallpaper? They both put some interest on the wall and are pleasing to their possessor (beauty in the eye of the beholder.)

  • allison0704
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    If you like Marcolo's suggestions, have you seen kitchens by the Workshop of David T Smith? Gorgeous. If I had found them before my local connection to the English cabinetmaker - as in England - I would have contacted them.

    We built an English cottage and I based the design of our island on this Chalon ad island:

    and this one:

    Our island was built as a single piece (base, antique pine was bought and assembled locally). It arrived on the boat distressed and painted, but not glazed. Pictures usually make the glazing areas look much darker than they are IRL. I think part of it is shadows also:

    I like this shot, but the island appears to be blue and it's not (F&B French Gray with a black based glaze). (Picture is older... I just saw Boomer sitting on the end shelf. He was such a sweet boy.)

    The painted black coffee station is located in the back hallway (between kitchen and laundry room). It's distressed, but hard to see in pictures. Here is a link to kitchen pictures, black hutch is the last photo: French Gray Island

    On Decorating threads, I've posted pictures of pieces (old and new) that sport distressed finishes. I thought this piece was old (the interior is) but two craftsmen that make things for me said the paint finish was new and done by someone that knows what they are doing. It's in the breakfast room:

    Here is its top: (The little donkey, btw, was purchased from David T Smith, as well as the Paper towel jar on the island)

    The guys made me a new "old" top for the breakfast room table. This is the only picture I can find on photobucket:

    I also have this piece, that I believe is old due to the drawers, back and bottom shelf detailing/wood:

    That has this top:

    My guys turned this old wood and metal shutter:

    ...into a door. It hides our DISH equipment and DVD storage:

    The copper panels slide apart to reveal the TV. They built that for me also.

    Like Mtnrdredux and a few others said, it can be done and done well, but the key is finding people that know what they are doing! And it has to fit in with the overall design of the house, your furniture, accessories, etc.

  • jdesign_gw
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I agree, the Chalon kitchens are great. The colors are interesting but I like their white the best with maybe a mix of something else like the stained wood. Downsview has some nice kitchens. I know them well. I did some work for one of their showrooms. They are made in Canada.
    John

  • mtnrdredux_gw
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I was taking photos of the tree and decided to try to shoot some that show my uber-subtle glazing and distress. My only purpose was to give the illusion of brush strokes and to not have the jarring perfection of new take over my old farmhouse.

    hth

    Close ups:{{gwi:1988607}}

    {{gwi:1988608}}

  • mtnrdredux_gw
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Oh and I meant to say "thanks" for the compliment, TorontoTim. My cabinets are copies of those found in an 1896 house i the historic town we moved in. I really like having sliding cabs.

  • beekeeperswife
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    mtnrdredux, ahhh, so lovely. I just love the way your cabinets look, so soft.

    But back to the OP question. My opinion is I don't want to do that to my cabinets. I always go back to the how-far-behind-the-times my new location is with stuff. When I told the builder's designer that I had chosen white painted cabinets she instantly assumed I meant the glazed ones...pulled one down for me. (I should have looked down at her shoes and then slowly back up and said "Anyway" as Marcolo suggested on another thread) But I just looked and said "no, just painted off white cabinets". Then she was onboard. But she just assumed that I would want the distressed/glazed cabinet. I guess once she got over the shock I wasn't going with the stained oak cabinets that everyone else in the county gets, she figured I must want the glazed/distressed ones for sure.

    I think if you are thinking resale in a few years, then they will be outdated for sure by then. And of course they will use your cabinets as the reason they won't buy your house.

    Bee

  • bigdoglover
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Bee, LOL using Marcolo's shoe-glancing/"anyway..." technique, I just read that thread, it was great.

    mtnrdredux, those are lovely == and that's my favorite knob shape. Coincidentally, after I told him I didn't want the distressing after all, my finisher came up with the idea of adding in some brush strokes.

    allison, thank you! for the David T. Smith link. Wish I had known about him previously, and am saving the link for my freestanding island (to be added.) My kitchen is already built, awaiting painting, and has some of those elements, though my doors are overlay. Thanks for all the photos, can't help but love most of those distressed pieces. I especially love your sofa table.

    jdesign, all these years I thought Downsview cabinets were from England! They sure are gorgeous.

    I've decided I'm not going with distressing at all, because the only kind I'd want would be the very subtle. My finisher is extremely talented, but I do not yet have within me the sense of exactly how that should be done, and I'm not sure he has that experience or sense within himself yet, and my experience has taught me that if someone doesn't have "the vision" within themselves on things like this, it's not going to come out in the product. So, I'm going to play it safe. I'm very grateful for all the ideas and instruction you all have given me, it's of immense help!

  • arch123
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Habersham Furniture has painted distressed furniture. We have a few pieces around our house and really enjoy living with them. The quality and design is great.
    http://www.habershamhome.com/products/cabinetry/kitchen.html?newP=2#pager

    Here is a link that might be useful: Habersham Furniture

  • Mercymygft
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    BDL...I see you have decided not to distress your cabinets. But I just wanted to say that I think distressed cabinets is a "look/style" just like any other style, traditional, modern, shaker, etc. The distressed/country look was very popular about 15 years ago or so, it seemed to be everywhere. I had a country style living room/dining room, complete with "new" distressed furniture. It was a look, I liked it.... and no I don't live in an 1800's farm house. I have recently changed out my furniture/style... just because we did some remodeling and got new furniture that is not in the country vein.

    I do think the country look is somewhat passe. However, if you don't go overboard with the "look" or distressing and you like it...go for it. If you are thinking in terms of resale, then you may want to reconsider since I think it is a more specific look and may not appeal to the masses.

  • Circus Peanut
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    You could just let your cabinets distress in place. You have big dogs, right?"

    Had to laugh at that one. Big dogs OR small kids would both work just fine to achieve what Mtnredux has.

    Re. resale, I can share that when I was house-hunting 4 years ago, I looked at one house that had a brand new kitchen with distressed glazed creamy cabinetry, wire cabinet door inserts, corbels and fake legs. My VERY first thought was: oh rats, I wonder how I can re-do this for the least money possible? Alas, glazing always reminds me of my 1970's "Faux French Provincial" bedroom furniture when I was a teen:

    As chance would have it, I wound up buying the house across the street from that one, and have often wondered whether the new owners did anything with that kitchen. From the state of their front yard, probably not ...

  • bigdoglover
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    archie, those are very pretty, thanks for the link.

    mercy, yeah you're right, it's a style, and everything goes out of style and then comes back in. So if resale is a consideration it's best to remain as non-stylish as possible -- which sounds awfully boring! lol And I suppose that means ten years from now my pricey Solarius granite is going to be dated too. That's a truly hideous thought, that a stone which has been millions of years in the making could become dated in ten. Darn I shoulda chosen white marble, that will never go out of date. And, IMHO, classic things will never go out of date -- raised panel cabinetry, and, of course anything 18th century! :-) Although, I have been horrified to see people on HGTV (Househunters in particular) badmouthing such beautiful and timeless forms as Williamsburg chandeliers and sconces. Oh, it makes me so sad to hear such comments, and then often to see what they've replaced it with in the "after" scenes. IMO the 1700's, what preceded it and all the wonderful freedom that was being born during that century came up with the most beautiful forms. I'm sure others feel that way about different periods though! :-)

  • Mercymygft
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    BDL... Right, what goes around, comes around. I think there is good bit of peer pressure here on GW, and too much is placed on the approval of other GW members. Like I said, if you like it go for it.

    I agree about HGTV. I watch some talk about how horrible some kitchens are, like the thought of living with a slightly outdated kitchen is the horror of horrors.... when I'm thinking "it doesn't look all that bad to me"!? And chandeliers that are pretty and classic, they feel they need to rip out 5 mins. after settlement. But whatever...to each his own I guess.