FIND PROFESSIONALS
SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
kiko_gw

Keep or Replace Funky Cabinet Doors in Kitchen?

kiko
7 years ago

I still haven't done anything with my kitchen since the last time I posted. We decided instead to have the popcorn removed from all our ceilings and we had the whole interior of our house painted (exceot the cabinetry); it was kind of a big project while we were living here. Anyway, we have recovered from that project and are looking at the kitchen again trying first to decide what to do with our kitchen cabinets. Should we just repaint all of our cabinets (probably in a white) or should we buy replacement doors in a shaker style (the only other style we like) maybe switching from partial overlay to full overlay? We can't decide. We do LIKE our doors but we wouldn't PICK them currently if we were building a house or kitchen from scratch. Are they too funky? Or are they just different enough to make our house unique? Or are they actually making our house ugly? Our kitchen has 26 doors and 19 drawers. All of the other cabinetry in the house is the same so for consistency we would have to replace it too, I think. That would be another 42 doors and 22 drawers. The cabinet fronts are solid oak. We painted the walls a light gray, Sherwin Williams Repose Gray which we LOVE but the walls just look white in this terrible iphone pic. We used it at 100% in the hallways and 50% in the rooms. Our cabinets now are painted inside and out a color similar to Sherwin Williams Accessible Beige.

Original Thread With Pictures (Feel Free to Add Comments There)
Clickable Link Below
http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/kitchbath/msg022011428656.html

Here is a link that might be useful: Funky Kitchen Cabinets - Original Post

This post was edited by kiko on Wed, Nov 5, 14 at 10:10

Comments (55)

  • Bunny
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Kiko, okay, I can see that consistency is very important to you.

    Since you're hiring someone to paint them, you're already aware of the cost involved. Getting new paint-grade maple doors is far less expensive than I'd imagined, about 25% of what painting them cost. But if you like the doors as-is, then you should keep them.

  • kiko
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Sigh, I agree with all these comments (funky, unique, too busy, quirky-bad, quirky-good), LOL. Here's the inside of the doors which I actually like better (the profile is more squared off instead of raised). But I really wouldn't be able to take seeing the old outside inside my cabinets every time I opened them. I don't even like how new cabinets are "two toned" like wood/ wood look inside and stained or painted wood outside. I think in the absolute I would prefer new doors but it seems wasteful (more from a resource standpoint than money). I also worry that new doors aren't going to give us that "hot" kitchen look I drool over because it's still a 1988 kitchen with a raised C-shaped peninsula etc.... Maybe I should just let the kitchen be?? Confused!

    Linelle, love your kitchen update! We don't have a Dacora dealer in DFW though.

  • Related Discussions

    Painted kitchen cabinets=funky texture. HELP!

    Q

    Comments (4)
    PinkBee, what paint are you using on your cabinets? I am painting trim.. and my first attempt was to use Benjamin Moore, White dove in an oil base, and found it to messy to clean, so I switched to their "Advanced", with is a water base - enamel finish. It is suppose to be great at leveling, leveling. It is - fantastic... looks like an oil base, but after a few weeks I decided I didn't care to the color of white dove - too much yellow, and I was looking more for a neutral off white. This forum raves about the color White Dove.. but to me, it was way to yellow! My search for the perfect white paint went on.. I tried 5, and just couldn't find the perfect one! I bought a subway tile, in the perfect off white color and tried to pick a paint from that... it brought me back to WHITE DOVE! ???? Than it finally dawned on me... the white dove paint I was using YELLOWED (within 3 weeks!) It was a completely different color from what I started out with. I switched to the Aura line, which will be non-yellowing. It goes on nice, but the advance went on smoother... but I'll take the light brush strokes in exchange of all my paint yellowing!
    ...See More

    kitchen cabinet door replacement question

    Q

    Comments (2)
    Most box stores have kitchen re-facing programs. In our local stores they only offer the wood doors unfinished (in oak and maple).
    ...See More

    Kitchen cabinet doors -- repair? replace?

    Q

    Comments (9)
    You can buy new doors inexpensively enough it make trying to repair the existing ones silly. Be aware gel stain is actually a form of paint. It is not a true stain. That has advantages and disadvantages. Easy to apply, relatively easy to remove(strippers/etc.) It does let some of the wood grain show. However, if you buy new doors, the maker should be able to come very close to matching what you have now. If you got unfinished wood, it would be possible to stain to match the existing color---IF. If you have the original stain recipe used on the cabinets. Most manufacturers use a blend of colors and different finishes. To match, you have to do the staining/finishing basically the same as the originals. I have a bit of experience in color matching on trim. I installed some rough cedar trim in a factory built house(not a mobile---this one had a real stone fireplace and two by six inch wall studs). The factory sent extra trim, but did not stain enough. I tried for two days to match the color---got close---but way off. Called the factory and they gave me the recipe---had four colors---of the same brand I was using. I had gotten two right. Would have never even tried one color and then there was the different amounts. So. My advice would be to save some frustration and get new doors. Have them match stain/finish and then even if you use gel stain, the new and old will match well.
    ...See More

    Replace Kitchen Cabinet Doors

    Q

    Comments (11)
    Painting is probably the least expensive, but I would get a professional. You can add a slight contrast in the crevices of the door detailing. Example would be off white or cream with a sand color detail. If in the future, you are definitely changing the countertop, I would try to decide if you want light cabinetry or dark cabinetry. The countertop color will be determined after the cabinet color that you prefer. Refacing with new doors, might be another less expensive option than removing cabinetry. I wouldn't only replace the doors. It would be too difficult to get a close match.
    ...See More
  • Bunny
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Kiko, I got my Decora doors through my KD. She works with other lines, but tried to get me something within my budget. BTW, I never thought I could afford a KD. She didn't charge a fee, but did get a cut of whatever I ordered from her. My cost was still well within my modest budget.

  • kiko
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    rtwilliams, I have thought about adding something to the top of the cabinets to get rid of the space between the cabinets and the ceiling but we have that crazy vaulted ceiling. Our uppers are currently about 45 inches high. There's about 15 inches above the cabinets on the exterior/fridge wall and about 8 feet above the cabinets/pantry on the cooktop oven wall. Can you take cabinets all the way up to a vaulted ceiling? I can't seem to find any pictures like that online.

    Linelle, how did you find your kitchen designer?

  • annaship1
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I am kind of digging those cabinets. I feel like when you have a unique design feature like this, you have to really commit to it to make it sing. I think that the tumbled stone/ceramic backsplash doesn't really go with them. The cabinets could look really glamorous with some new sleek (brass, maybe?) hardware and a less-rustic looking backsplash. How is the style in the rest of the house? Does the house lean modern, rustic, traditional? I am seeing some great late 70's early 80's glam in these, but I know that is not everyone's cup of tea! They could even go a bit MCM with the right finishes...

  • sjhockeyfan325
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I don't dislike them, but I do think they're kind of busy for the size of the space. Regardless, I agree with the previous poster who suggested replacing the backsplash and hardware.

  • likewhatyoudo
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I don't think going all the way up with a vaulted ceiling is a good idea. I think what makes them seem unbalanced is that they have a small crown trim on top.

    I think your raised peninsula looks nice. I am sure in your perfect ideal kitchen it would not be what you would pick but it really is nicely done. From the pictures in your picasa album I can tell you have good design style and I love the modern style you have going on in your other furniture and art.

    I have the huge empty walls above my 42 inch cabinets and I don't care for it in my home but it is not something I will be changing. In a perfect world I would add beams or drop it to 10 foot flat ceiling.

    I have a vault in most of the rooms in this house is that how your home is? When we do the remodel to our master bath, I will be dropping the ceiling to a 10 foot flat ceiling in the bathroom.

    Here is my kitchen/great room space:

    This post was edited by rtwilliams on Wed, Nov 5, 14 at 14:13

  • Bunny
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Kiko, I found my KD at a kitchen and bath design shop. I had thought going that route was out of my league, but one day I stopped in and she was nice and interested in my project. She was a great fit for me. She's moved to another shop and I went to her for help with my guest bath remodel. I would look for kitchen/bath design stores in your area, stop in and find out how their fees work. Mine did not charge a set fee for my project, nor did I feel gouged because she got a cut of what I paid.

  • debrak2008
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I might be wrong but doesn't/didn't someone else have cabinets like this but not painted? Name starts with an M or ma? Might have been a galley kitchen. They did some minor updates I think.

    Edited to add: This is the kitchen I was thinking of, maybe not exactly the same but the same idea.

    Here is a link that might be useful: marit8a's kitchen

    This post was edited by debrak2008 on Wed, Nov 5, 14 at 19:07

  • kiko
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Well, darn, I just priced out ONE door at Barker and it would be $105. So guesstimating 77 doors would be $8,000 plus I' d still need to get the boxes painted and new hinges PLUS 43 drawer fronts. This might get up to $20,000 fast just for cabinets in the whole house, right? Maybe I should just focus on the kitchen (42 doors and 19 drawers)? But the door style is so distinctive I think it would be odd to leave the funky cabinetry in the bathrooms. Our house is just a one story.

    SHAKER Unfinished Cabinet Doors (inset panel)
    [quantity:1][WIDTH:18.25][HEIGHT:43][size verification:the door HEIGHT is between 30" and 48" (1 ip tall)][drill hinge cup:custom dimension from top and bottom (2 cups) (describe in "notes" field)][hinge side:N/A- rectangular door allows left or right side hinge][wood type:Paint Grade: frame= alder, panel= mdf (recommended)][finish options:DOVER WHITE varnish (2 coats primer + 2 coats paint)][frame widths:3 1/2" Stiles x 3 1/2" Rails]

    rtwilliams, love your house! Good question about the ceilings. Just the kitchen/family room and living room have straight cathedral ceilings; great room is 16 feet high and living room 14 feet high. Everything else varies. 9 feet flat ceilings in entry hall, front/backs halls, powder room, Jack/Jill bath, laundry and master bath WC. 9.5 feet angled tray ceilings in two bedrooms. 10.5 feet flat ceiling in entry hall. 11 foot angled tray in one bedroom and 9 foot double tray with angled sides in master bedroom. Our master bath ceiling is 11.5 feet high flat ( but the shower is only 7 feet high!!). Dining room is 13 feet high double tray ceiling. And we have a guest bath that has just an 8 foot high ceiling. How high is your master bath ceiling now? Decorating "high volume" spaces is challenging!

    deborak2008, no that definitely looks like our door style! Is she in DFW? Did she do a "final reveal" I wonder. We have a friend who has the same cabinets and has just finished updating her kitchen. Maybe when dh and I see it we can decide which way we want to go.

  • kiko
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Not sure what style our house is??? Even the outside looks funky! Funky Old Chicago brick, funky concrete tile roof, funky stone quoins on corner. So would this style of house need a particular type of kitchen? Or it doesn't matter with a 1988 home?
    http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=2niu1s5&s=8#.VFvN7mK9KSM

    Our front door also has a " funky rectangles" theme

    And Our French doors have a "funky rectangle" theme too! I actually picked these out a couple of years ago because I thought they went well with the rest of the rectangles!

    The rest of the interior doors look like this

    This post was edited by kiko on Thu, Nov 6, 14 at 14:58

  • debrak2008
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Marti8a is still around. Attached is a current thread she has on the decor forum. You could click on her name you may be able to email her. If that doesn't work, post in her current thread. I don't know what DFW is so can't answer that.

    Here is a link that might be useful: marti8a decor forum thread

  • palimpsest
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    You can still order this doorstyle from Scherr's.

    I think it's a riff on Victorian paneling. There are houses here from the late 19th century with that alternating panel on wainscoting.

  • likewhatyoudo
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    kiko - I laugh because when we bought our house it had a definite square obsession going on! Love your interior doors. They just took it one step too far on the kitchen cabinets. Would you like to see my squares??

    Edit to add: I love your exterior and all the other doors! How cool to have all the detail going on.

    This post was edited by rtwilliams on Thu, Nov 6, 14 at 18:32

  • debrak2008
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    kiko, I love your doors. I would flip them around.

  • deickhoff0
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I'd replace the cabinet doors, but I'd leave the other doors.

    I think your exterior is beautiful, and will allow for anything you love in your kitchen

  • Kippy
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I LOVE the interior of the doors, I would be figuring out how to turn them inside out as well. Maybe they put them up backwards to start with......

  • detroit_burb
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    kiko, I really like your house! I would call it bungalowish.

  • threepinktrees
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Here's another view of the same cabinets, freshly stained.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Another shot of Marti8a's kitchen

  • HomeChef59
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    If budget is a consideration and the layout is fine, I'd keep the cabinets. I think they are fine. Just paint them whatever color suits you. People pay a lot of money for painted kitchens. New hardware, new pulls, countertop, backsplash and appliances, you are in business.

  • athomeinvagw
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I would replace the doors. There is no way I would put any money at all into what you currently have, not even for paint. The drawer fronts are nice, maybe you can keep them and just replace the doors?

  • Bunny
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Kiko, my replacement doors and end panels are full-overlay shaker, paint-grade maple with MDF inserts. I just checked the invoice from my KD and they were billed at $48 each. Some are small, e.g., little doors above range hood and fridge, while others are large pantry doors and end panels. I have all slab drawer fronts, also paint-grade maple and they were $10 each. Everything my final price and it included whatever my KD got in the deal.

    So, quite a difference between Barker and Decora.

  • practigal
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    The doors have a certain charm. They also represent a distinct commitment in taste. If they are not to your taste then I would not put any more money into them and I would pick something that you really liked.

  • tnfarmhouselove
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I recently priced out doors for my kitchen cabinets (uppers are 39" tall) and they averaged about half of your quote, but they were paint ready and unfinished. Your quote looks like it includes the cost of the Dover White factory finish, which does add quite a bit to the cost.

    I like the inside of your doors more than the outside, if you can turn them around. Otherwise, I think changing out the doors could look really good. That's what we decided to do in our kitchen. I'm just worried about getting the measurements right since we're going from partial to full overlay.

  • patty_cakes
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Can you reverse them as someone else suggested? If not, and the the center is just an inset, why couldn't you just have a new backing made and have bead board put over it? You could also have someone jigsaw out the center part if it's not removable.

    Your kitchen looks fairly updated, although the countertop and tile doesn't seem to be the best match~change the tile since it's cheaper and leave the countertop.

    I wouldn't say your cute little home is 'funky', although it seems someone had a love affair w/rectangles!

  • tomatofreak
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Omigosh, there's a word for your kitchen and it is: UNIQUE! It sounds like all the cabinetry is quality material. Please stop toying with all these ideas of turning them around, replacing, etc., etc.. If it's in your budget to contract repainting them, why not pay to have them stripped first. The wood may be gorgeous under all that paint and you may decide to stain instead of paint. All I can say is, if you take those doors off and put trendy shaker style doors on, you'll just have an ordinary kitchen, like most of America. There's a big plus to being different!

  • ChristyMcK
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I think this totally comes down to your preference but I agree the poster above who said:

    I love your doors. Yep, they are funky - but in a way that says "Hey, I'm unique and special", and not in a way that says "Whoever designed me was on drugs, and I'm best appreciated by other people on drugs"

    Your cabinets are cool in an aging vintage/funky way that will only get cooler as the house ages IMHO. Any cabinet faces you replace them with will date faster and look uncool sooner. I'd keep 'em but that's just me and we kept our 1939 cabinets so I guess I'm in the preserve camp in general.

  • kiko
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Thank you so much for the input and comments. It's a huge help in thinking about this. OK, I have thought about my cabinet conundrum a little more. I also sat down with dh to talk about it some more. I showed him two Shaker door kitchens from linelle and one other kitchen (can't remember who now .... replaced a newer brown wood kitchen with more period appropriate new doors in white shaker). He was amazed at the transformation (I think he was having trouble picturing the idea of new doors ... because he doesn't spend his spare time looking at kitchen pictures ).

    We also looked at the link of marti8a's cabinets like ours but refinished darker. Although that is a nice look (and do-able for our cabinets because our doors are solid oak, nice quality), we want more contrast and our floors are staying the current dark oak and the countertops are staying the current mid-gray granite. So dark stain is out.

    What about the kind of crazy idea of having the cabinets refinished in a "wire brushed oak in a driftwood gray"? Like this link
    http://media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/a3/4c/02/a34c0291127f2bcf86180f5a0f579c56.jpg
    OMG, that wood finish is gorgeous!!!!!! I know our doors and cabinet boxes are oak. Could we have that fabulous gray finish?? I would do that in a heartbeat!

    Barring that, I am leaning towards painting the cabinets a white inside and out, replacing the painted-over hinges, and swapping out the pulls and backsplash. My main reasoning is this: my FIRST gripe about our cabinets is that the prior owner painted over the hinges. Every time I open a cabinet I think "Ugh, those (now scraped off) hinges look awful". My SECOND gripe about our cabinets is the ten year old paint job has some chips. My THIRD gripe is the color, which is more tan than the gray/white I would prefer now. So none of my first 3 complaints about my cabinets have to do with the door style, right?

    Edited to add clickable link below

    Here is a link that might be useful:

    This post was edited by kiko on Sun, Nov 9, 14 at 9:02

  • ChristyMcK
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    We had paint all over our hinges as well. I actually liked the color of the cabinets but I did repaint them (the same color) because like your cabinets, the paint job was worn and in my case, a little shoddy. I also had paint on the hinges and my mom and I and took every hinge (there were over 100) and stripped them of paint before reattaching them. A HUGE amount of work (thank goodness from my mom, who likes to help) but they look So Much Better.

  • kiko
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    ChristyMcK, is your kitchen all done? I couldn't find a link to it. I do, luckily, know for a fact that all of our hinges are yucky 80's brass. Wouldn't that be awful if I stripped them to just find out they were unusable???

  • speaktodeek
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    LOVE those doors, they are unique and go well with the rest of the space in your house. Don't buy into the cookie cutter mentality when you have a house with a unique personality! If you like these doors, work WITH them! I'd keep them in a heartbeat, but of course it's your space so YOU should love it!

    That said, a few points to consider. These doors would look mind-blowing in a brushed weathered oak COLOR! But I think given the other elements in our house, the huge movementy chunky granite/counter, the rustic weathered grainy floor, etc., a wood-grainy brushed oak finish would be overload. The weathered oak grain would fight with the floor wood grain and the lines of the door panels and all that chunky blotchy movement of the counters, and just be too, too much visually. Your feature is the panels, not the wood grain, on the doors.

    How about a compromise: Put a beautiful soft weathered grey color paint on them, and possibly a very subtle weathered glazing. Choose a grey that has a bit of warmth, but just a bit, to pick up some of the creamy taupy tones elsewhere and the warmth of your floor, rather than a cool grey.

    One thing nobody's mentioned is that the panels are the focus on these doors. Therefore, I'd pick a hardware that is as invisible as possible. The painted hinges actually are doing you a favor, blending with the doors. Imagine that complex visual of your doors now with pops of hardware also competing for attention. Better to have hardware that is not asking for attention.

    So imagine a warm weathered grey with very subtle glazing, hardware that is blending with this, possibly an antiqued nickel or something like that that blends into the cabinets mostly.

    Also, the backsplash just has to go. The squares fight with the rectangular panels of the doors. I'd almost do a backsplash that is not shapes, such as painted or beadboard, so you don't get this competition of shapes in your backsplash versus the panels on the doors. Most tiles you put there are going to compete with the panels, unless you do something like a penny tile mosaic that just has nothing to do with rectilinear shapes. Just MHO.

    This post was edited by beautybutdebtfree on Sun, Nov 9, 14 at 9:56

  • kiko
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    beautybutdebtfree, I think you may be right about that. We do have a lot of busy elements in our kitchen already. I was thinking that a subway tile would echo the doors and look better. Actually, I thought it was really our only option. Do you think gray painted cabinets would be better than a white?

  • oldfixer
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Keep them, with a color you like, and new hardware. Unless the hinges clean up to something interesting too. I'm not smart enough to notice if a cabinet in a bathroom matches those in a kitchen(??)

  • speaktodeek
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Right now white is the hot thing going. So to paint them white, you look like you are trying to do the present fad on on old cabinets. White gets dirty and sometimes yellows and any scuffs or scratches or chips show very easily on white.

    A carefully chosen weathered color will take away the starkness of white, add a designer element, soften the lines of the cabinets (With white the contrast between white and lines/shadows is like black and white, so more harsh than if you have the same shapes in a quiet color, which a weathered color would be. In other words, imagine you had a pure white sculpture and shone a bright light on it. The light is brighter on the bright spots, the shadows are more harsh because they are contrasted against bright white. Now take the same sculpture in a weathered color and shine light on it. The contrast between the soft weathered color and the shadows is softer, less harsh. Especially if you have in between tones, such as a subtle glazing, on the surfaces.).

    Personally, I would not do ANY type of rectilinear shaped tile in the backsplash area. It will ALWAYS visually compete with your panels, and not in a complementary way. You need "white space" in the backsplash area - something without shapes defined, expecially anything rectilinear (square or rectangle). You also don't need anything attention grabbing there. You need quiet there, whatever it is. You might be able to get away with tile if you use a very small one such as mosaic. And if it's mosaic and rectangles, I'd orient them long axis up and down, the same as your cabinet panel rectangles. The difference in shape SIZE between your cabinet panels and your SMALL tile might work. But any rectangles that compete with your panels is going to rob you of a really great design element. Don't dilute the door panels by competing with them on the backsplash, IMHO. Subway is the LAST tile I'd choose there! It DIRECTLY competes with the door panels rectangles, has a different spacing, is usually laid in the horizontal long axis - everything about that is wrong, to go with the door panels. If you use any tile at all it should be less than 2 inch size, so the shapes are not seen from a distance. Matte finish, so you aren't bouncing shine off your beautiful counters around. And grout the same color as the tile. But I don't think tile is a great choice, first. Just something very, very visually quiet in that backsplash space.

    Here's sorta a finish I had in mind, in terms of quiet weathered color and subtle glazing. Note that with this glazing technique they have NOT allowed it to accumulate in the cracks, making MORE pronounced lines. They only used it to lightly texture the color and add a bit of dimension. The color is not quite right; you'd need to pick up a little bit of mauve undertone to pull together the red tones in your taupy paint and red/brown wood floor and slightly mauve-y splotched granite. You could even use your exact wall paint formulation on them, and then put a very subtle charcoal glaze over:

    Photo credit: http://bella-tucker.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/grey-cabinet-finish-1024x681.jpg

    This post was edited by beautybutdebtfree on Sun, Nov 9, 14 at 13:26

  • ChristyMcK
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    It's not yet done. We are waiting on the backsplash so I haven't posted it. Here's a picture just after one of the main rounds of painting. I repainted the interiors which were a red to the navy blue. The red was from 1967 and was sloughing everything it touched. The exterior cabinet color which I call 'lemon chiffon cake' is Ambertique by Pratt & Lambert. It's cream enough to hide some dirt which is great because I'm a messy cook.

    It would SUCK to clean all the hardware only not to use it. I'd definitely make that decision ahead of time. Lately I've been seeing some nice two-toned kitchens (dark bottom such as grey, navy, even black and light uppers such as white). I've even see brass coming back so look at lots of kitchens before you decide.

  • ChristyMcK
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    And here's a picture before painting. It's hard to tell a difference in photos but it's not in person!

  • bellafiore
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I like the idea of keeping the cabinets and painting them gray. Lighter on the upper and darker on the lower. Definitely change out the hardware.

  • nosoccermom
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Can you hang the doors inside out?

  • Bunny
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Change the doors. They look like photo collages without the photos.

  • kiko
    Original Author
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    nosoccermom, although we do like the interior much better I don't think we would reverse them. They have a big "double bevel" (not sure the correct cabinet term?) all around the edge as do the drawers. I think it would look a bit "low rent" because the current "face" is clearly the front of the doors and the drawers all have that same "double bevel" around the edge. We aren't doing this DIY so would that be a lot of money to achieve a DIY look, LOL?

  • bellafiore
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I lived in a condo with the same exact doors and jambs as you. I painted my kitchen cabinets white and refaced with white doors similar to yours. They reflect the look of all the other woodwork in your house. I had a small kitchen, so all the doors were not that expensive, since I kept the boxes. However, I did make them full size with hidden hinges, which definitely cleaned up the look.

    I also added a beautiful stepped molding at the top of the cabinets and added strings of LED rope lighting behind it. It was gorgeous at night.

  • nosoccermom
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    How big a deal would it be to strip the doors? I think a weathered gray oak finish would look great, kind of like Feisty's quest for the grayish finish. Also, have you abandoned the idea of some glass inserts? It would provide some relief from all that pattern.

    Here is a link that might be useful: thread on gray-stained oak.

  • annaship1
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Is anyone else worried that grey-stained oak will be the "pickled oak" of the 2010's? Just me?

    If it were me, I would stick to paint or "wood" stain, but I am a scaredy cat like that :-).

  • nosoccermom
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Could be, but I don't think it's as big a deal to "fix" it as the pickled oak.

  • Caya26
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    JMHO, but I think if you keep your current doors, the weathered grey stained oak finish would be a bit too busy, with everything else going on in the kitchen.

    You said that you LIKE the doors, but would not PICK them CURRENTLY if you were starting from scratch. To me, that answers your question. I would change the doors, to the ever classic timeless shaker style that you like. I do not think you will regret it. Of course if money is an issue, then just paint.

    I would not worry about the rest of the house cabinets being the same, at least not for now. You could change them over time.

    This post was edited by Caya26 on Tue, Nov 11, 14 at 0:10

  • TxMarti
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Kiko, I don't know if you got my last email. These cabinets are fairly common where I live so not a big turn off to buyers as they will see them often if they are looking at custom homes built in the 1970s-1980s. I just came across one today while browsing homes for sale. This one looks completely original and shows a detail that really bugged me about this cabinet builder - the cabinet that housed the double oven. I also had a pantry the same height and noticed you had something that height. They may not be a problem for tall people, but I couldn't get to the cabinets over them. I changed that with our remodel.

    I talked to my friend who had the same cabinets, thought I might get a picture of them painted for you. But she painted some, disliked the way they looked painted, mainly because the dust showed up so much more than when they were stained, and she replaced them with plain doors.

  • TxMarti
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Oh, and here's another with similar doors, not quite as funky as ours. These are painted and might give you an idea of what yours would look like gray.

  • mdln
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I really like the doors. Nice to see something original and not cookie-cutter, like everything else out there. I would definately keep them.

  • basketlacey
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I love the idea of painting them gray. I was going to suggest the knobs that look like crystals and then saw that they are in one of the pics that someone posted above. I think that would look great with a simple backsplash!

  • bellafiore
    7 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Leave the cabinets, they look fine. REPLACE the funky backsplash. Tiles should be a much smaller scale, like little mosaic glass tiles, gray and beige to tie the walls and cabinets together. That's it. Cheap beautiful fix.