FIND PROFESSIONALS
SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
Houzz Logo Print
weedpuller1954

Do you regret wood-look vinyl planks?

Weedpuller1954
9 years ago

We are ready to begin our kitchen renovation and new flooring for most of our main floor. I posted several weeks ago asking about flooring for multiple areas and got several good recommendations. Because we are in a semi-rural area, have 3 dogs and a pool, we decided on LVT wood-look planks. Or so I thought. DH is having second thoughts, afraid the floor will look "cheap" and lower the value of our home. He wants to go with stone or ceramic tile in the kitchen, and hardwood everywhere else. I hate grout, and prefer a resilient kitchen floor (back and leg issues). I also think hardwood would be a maintenance nightmare with our location/lifestyle. We have to settle this issue ASAP. Any comments, photos, advice are welcome.

Comments (246)

  • Daisy K
    last year
    last modified: last year

    @ Chessie. All those are good reasons to get LVP. Having pets is a great reason. A beachhouse rental makes a lot of sense. i was directing it to people who dont put alot of thought into their flooring, But really sellers of once rental properties who dont have to live there. I would not buy a house from someone who installed LVP just to put a floor in. I find that tacky. Also LVP is more expensive than many more natural floors.

  • btydrvn
    last year

    Like everything else ...some people just get stuck in a rut...in the past...like anything new is not as good as the “real thing”....those who decide whether a homeowner has the right “motives” for using LVP?...it is okay in the kitchen but not in the living room?..really?..how about it is the product of the future?...it saves the trees that make our air better to breathe?...it lasts forever?....it is not a job to maintain?...🤷🏼‍♀️

  • Related Discussions

    Powder room accent wall: vinyl wood look plank vs. hardwood planks

    Q

    Comments (5)
    We have LVT wood planks for our basement floor. It's a great surface... for a rec-room floor. We recently had an appraisal and the appraiser thought it was laminate, like a lot of people do. I don't think it would make a very nice looking accent wall. I think for the impact and price you'd rather do wood.
    ...See More

    Can I use wood look vinyl plank or tile on walls

    Q

    Comments (9)
    I don't really understand what you're proposing, but I don't think that vinyl flooring or porcelain tile are going to be appropriate materials for the exterior of your home, and neither would be amenable to paint, so you'd be getting the look of fake wood-grain all over, which feels more Colorado than Florida. Maybe you need to post a few examples of homes whose look you like so that we can help you capture some of that feeling here. I honestly think that the current finishes work pretty well, but I'm sure there are alternatives too.
    ...See More

    luxury vinyl plank wood look flooring

    Q

    Comments (9)
    @millworkman Waterproof in the sense of everyday, common mishaps. It’s a floating installation. No one expects it to protect their subfloor from a flood. Don’t be obtuse. When installed, planks lock together with a rubber tongue and groove. Spilled water does not permeate the seams. It sits on top. Test it out. In the event of flooding, you can easily take apart the planks, dry them out and reinstall.
    ...See More

    Luxury vinyl wood look plank or marble like tile for home in TX?

    Q

    Comments (13)
    I'm in S. Florida with a similar situation except we plan to move probably 5-6yrs. When we bought our house 10 yrs ago it was carpeted except the living/dining room had engineered wood. It was very pretty looking but we knew the carpet had to go and it would be expensive because it involved 3 bedrooms and family room. I have allergies and will not live in a house with carpet. Plus heat and humidity can cause mold. In our previous house of 40 yrs we had wood floors throughout except kitchen and baths. I decided to use tile. Its easier to clean and I didn't have to worry about water from the kitchen. We put tile in all the bedrooms and bathrooms. The Family Room we went with a wood looking tile. I made sure the installer made the grout lines as close as possible to mimic wood. Most people think its wood. Its so easy to clean, mop. The engineered wood has held up over 10 yrs but a section has buckled (have no idea why) and I find spots are hard to remove, unlike real wood. If I were you, I'd go with insurance pays and put in wood looking tile at least in the living areas. It really looks good. Jane
    ...See More
  • Daisy K
    last year
    last modified: last year

    And some people will defend their investments blindly.

    Vinyls and plastic inventions are just another way to make money so while we are depleting the planet of renewable resources more slowly we are polluting it with plastics that, when they do break down, (because it doesnt last forever) it will kill living organisms.

    Make more bad stuff and make people think its great. Like margarine. People buy into this out of necessity (its available) and ignorance. Things are not meant to last forever. Nothing that lasts "forever" is good for the environment. This is not new information.

    Other "inventions" that people didnt know they needed is spf Fabrics that protect your from the sun (just as fabric itself has always done already) and Stretchy plastic polymer fabrics as if cotton wasnt always stretchy. Simply put its marketing and it works but its not good for the planet.

  • Toni S
    last year

    Daisy, what do you suggest then? Dirt or rock floors, bamboo? I’m seriously wondering?

  • Nancy K
    last year

    @Daisy K The plastics and off gassing from vinyl flooring, along with it winding up in a landfill for thousands of years is what scares me away from LVT. Supposedly they have improved it so there is less off gassing but wondering how high the floor certifcation standards are. I think our society is way too dependent on plastics and I have been trying to reduce my plastic usage but it is difficult. What gets me too is that LVT is all made in China I believe and is not any cheaper than engineered hardwood.

  • Chessie
    last year
    last modified: last year

    LOL. Clearly it comes down to personal preference. The OP posted this thread EIGHT years ago. We all know (or should) how far engineered flooring products have come since then. There will always be people that think everyone else should abide by their preferences and logic, but this is simply not ever a reasonable (or logical) thought. The latest quality WPC flooring products are just amazing, and look beautiful in ANY home. There are many many reasons why this flooring can be a better option for a lot of folks, but that does not mean that wood or engineered wood or tile, is not right for someone else. There are also many reasons why a less-expensive product is a better option. Again, that does not take away from the other products. Not everyone has the same home or lives the same lives in those homes.

    We all have LOTS of options for flooring today, far more than was available 50 years ago, and that is an awesome thing. It really should be left at that.

  • silken1
    last year
    last modified: last year

    @Nancy K that is such an uninformed statement to say all LVP is made in China. Many are made elsewhere. Ours was made in S. Korea where they have been using it for decades and make superior brands. Ours was certified green and no off gassing. In our cabin where I had a pallet of the flooring, there wasn't even an odour. Mine was also less $ than engineered hardwood and getting it installed and finished. And hardwood in a cabin where the temps drop quite low in winter and where wet and sandy feet come in was just not an option. Or at least not an intelligent one.

  • Nancy K
    last year

    @silken1 I know they have made great improvements in LVT with regard to toxicity. Glad to hear it is not all made in China. I can definitely understand why people want to use it in certain situations. The engineered flooring used to be super toxic too...but has also been improved. For people with slabs or basements, I can especially see why they would be drawn to LVT. They say engineered flooring could work in these areas but I wonder. Our new house is on a slab...going with acid stained floors but if they do not work out we could be tempted by LVT.

  • silken1
    last year

    Nancy K That just reminds me of another very environmentally bad choice most of us make with our homes. Concrete is one of the very worse! Yet we have been using it for eons. So I think we just need to choose our battles and try and be kind to the earth as best we can, even if we don't always succeed. Good luck with your new house.

  • Daisy K
    last year

    What i suggest we do about floors is regulate the manufacturing with strict protocols on toxicity. We dont let anyone who wants to make yet another LVP or WPC floor to do so indiscriminately. Lower the use of vinyl and start using things like wood flour, rosins, ground limestone, powdered cork, pigments, jute and linseed oil which make linoleum. Remember that? There are many creative ways to make natural floors without more plastic. We need to start ramping down on plastic and soon. There is a big price to pay for buying less expensive items.

  • Nancy K
    last year

    @silken1

    “Nancy K That just reminds me of another very environmentally bad choice most of us make with our homes. Concrete is one of the very worse! Yet we have been using it for eons. So I think we just need to choose our battles and try and be kind to the earth as best we can, even if we don't always succeed. Good luck with your new house.”


    Great point. I agree on saving on concrete but also reducing footprint to save on all sorts of stuff. We made our new house as small as we could. There is no wasted space. We also built on a slab vs basement which is pretty much unheard of here. Instead of then covering the slab up and wasting on additional flooring we simply acid stained it. It turned out great. Our new house is passive solar as well and concrete floors help with that.


  • silken1
    last year

    @Nancy K

    We also live in a slab home which in our part of Canada is almost unheard of. Sadly, I think our building laws do not allow it anymore. I don't understand why as we never have a basement flooding issue and our home has been solid for many years. It has in floor heat which is another reason why wood floors were never a good option for us.. Most of our home is ceramic tile floor except for the TV room is LVP. I too agree on reducing footprint. Many homes are huge and so much more than a person needs.

  • Nancy K
    last year

    @silken1


    I am so glad your slab home has worked for you. We were a little nervous about it. However, I do not like basements. Had one my whole life. I call them junk accumulators. I so agree on the reducing of footprint. Houses are usually way too big. They compensate for the extra cost by using cheap materials and construction methods. Then people rip out perfectly good kitchens every few years to keep up with what is ”trending”. In the old days, people built with quality and things were made to last. And it was okay for something to look like it was used.

  • Chessie
    last year

    I'd never have a home on a slab, unless there was no other option. My home is on a crawlspace, which is pretty standard in this part of the country.

  • Nancy K
    last year

    There are pros and cons to every foundation type. However, we decided against a crawlspace to avoid mold and vermin. It has the disadvantages of a basement with none of the advantages.

  • btydrvn
    last year

    There was mention about acid wash floors... I must say that was my most favorite floor finish ever.. I hope you are scoring the floor to avoid cracks... not knowing this is what forced me in the end to install the LVP... not that I knew how great it was but wood was not an option in our case ...so some of us stumble into the best solution...now I would never use anything but LVP... on the acid wash we used a clear sealer coat that was shiny and lasted 10 years before it needed any attention

  • btydrvn
    last year

    The one major mistake I regret was to rule out radiant heat... huge expense... huger mistake not to do it... the concept being that radiant heat remains closer to the floor... where we are...not rising to most of our high ceilings...cutting heating time and energy bills.., to 1/3 of costs in a normal home... with an added plus if you have lots of big windows facing the right way .. that also heats the slab.... if our home wasn’t so perfect for us ... I would build again just to include that

  • Nancy K
    last year

    @btydrvn We had considered in floor heating, but are using minisplits. However, winters are typically fairly mild here and summers are super hot and steamy so needed AC anyway. Our house is passive solar with a large number of south facing windows that are shaded in summer. We are hoping the slab heats up in winter from the sun.

  • btydrvn
    last year

    Not sure what minisplits are but it sounds like you gave all the right thought to your situation....our situation is very similar ...except we are not here in the winter..that is what sadly discouraged the expense of the heated floors...my house in Aspen had them ...still remember what a luxurious pleasure that was in the cold winters...

  • Chessie
    last year

    Nancy K

    There are pros and cons to every foundation type. However, we decided against a crawlspace to avoid mold and vermin. It has the disadvantages of a basement with none of the advantages.


    My crawlspace is conditioned, so there are no issues at all with mold, vermin, or otherwise. If I need to go under the house to look at a pipe or whatever, I can do it in my dress clothes if I want. It's very clean under there.

  • Nancy K
    last year

    @Chessie I am glad your crawlspace is working for you. Most people I know here struggle with humidity issues, rodents and insects. It is super humid here. It was one of my inlaws major regrets. However, having access to plumbing is definitely a plus. We may regret the slab but feel we made the best decision at the time based upon the information we had.

  • btydrvn
    last year

    I am wondering how you can “condition” a crawl space to eliminate all those usual inconveniences? Just curious

  • Chessie
    last year

    btydrvn

    I am wondering how you can “condition” a crawl space to eliminate all those usual inconveniences? Just curious


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJT3hOhNjoY&ab_channel=BAYCrawlspaceandFoundationRepair

  • btydrvn
    last year

    Whoa!...guess I may have seen that before?... wonder how common this is?... depending on the reason and the space ...and the expense...it may be worth it? .....thanx for the info

  • btydrvn
    last year

    Think it was the wording that was confusing.... “vapor barrier” vs. “condition”

  • Chessie
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Everyone with a crawlspace has a vapor barrier, or should. Any termite inspector will quickly set you straight on that .

    Encapsulating the crawlspace is pretty common now in areas of high humidity - it is something that a handy homeowner can do himself at not great expense. I paid a company to do mine and for me it has been worth every penny..

  • whmscll
    last year

    I am curious to know, are most of you who are commenting on here real estate professionals, interior designers or otherwise involved professionally in the home improvement business?

  • JP L
    last year

    Not a pro, but have traveled these forums enough to know that LVT/LVP is like the "veganism" or "cross-fit" of home improvement apparently - the people that have it are REALLY into it, and seem to care that other people don't prefer it.

  • btydrvn
    last year

    whm….in answer to your question ..i think there are more non-pro’s than pro’s in these discussions…some of the pro’s will state their status…some of them are looking for business…or “advertising “….or even retired….but mostly i think it is creative..talented ..people with lots of experience on the things discussed..that just want to share their ideas…after participating for a while you do acquire a lot of insight and understanding and enjoyment and information on the topic of design …if you are referencing the topic of this discussion …it appears to me it is a product of the future that has formed a love/ hate following …probably since it is so new on the scene

  • Chessie
    last year

    "are most of you who are commenting on here real estate professionals, interior designers or otherwise involved professionally in the home improvement business?"


    I am simply a homeowner - not in any home-related business at all.

  • Daisy K
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Ive been looking for a place to live for over 2.5 years. lol. Ive seen terrible things. lol. then i go on you tube and look at how things should be built. Hoping to take home inspection classes and get certified someday in the next few years. There is a lot of knowledge out there and no professional has time to specialize in everything. Things change exponentially on a daily basis. Most information is out there for everyone to read and consider. I dont know if hidden and secret information make someone more professional . There are amazing people and professionals out there building things etc, who have never had any formal schooling.

  • misscourtnie23
    3 months ago

    I know this thread is old but I thought I would add my experience in case anyone looks this up. I had engineered hardwood in my last house and didn't care for it. It had a deep bevel and was also in the kitchen as well as the main living area so we were constantly worried about water. There were several places that the finish had worn off (by the door from the previous owner) and was just raw wood. In our new (to us) house, we decided to do LVP. 3 dogs and now 3 kids, we thought it would be better. I got a high end LVP and we've had it for two years. It is waterproof but to me, that's where the plusses end. I don't know quite how to describe it but it just doesn't have the same presence as wood. The feel of this material is more commercial even though it looks like it's wood and has wood texture. It sort of feels like an uncanny valley with the material. It doesn't feel near as homey as wood but I can't quite put my finger on why. There's a couple of things that I've been disappointed with. It scratches and dents very easily. So does wood so that's the same except that with wood, it sort of blends and with the LVP, it sticks out like a sore thumb. I had a huge ding in my floor at my last house and I have several dings on the floor at this house and the other you couldn't really tell. It's like the way it dents the picture of wood is more noticeable than when it dented real wood. The biggest thing that I've noticed with it is the wood texture on it doesn't match up with the picture. There's swoopy texture where there's lines on the picture and vice versa. Maybe they've fixed this by now with newer products. It also is still very very flat looking. When seen from a distance, the way the light bounces off it makes it look like a giant sticker despite the texture.


    I think a lot of it depends on your personality. It's like marble vs a marble looking quartz. To me, there's a depth lacking in the marble-look quartz that is more noticeable and irritating to me than some stains or etching in real marble. If you don't mind the patina and that it won't look perfect, you'll want real wood. In a few years, when this floor has had it, I'm putting in real wood. I know lots of people love it but after two years, I'm ready to switch back to wood. I'm on the fence about tile or wood in the kitchen because I don't want to stress over the water like I did in my last kitchen (which oddly enough was never a problem in that location). Grout is the worst and never feels clean.


    By the way, the idea of wood being softer than tile is only true if you have a wood subfloor. If you are on a concrete slab, it's pretty much the same. Source: have had concrete slabs with all three flooring. It's all hard on your feet/joints. Get squishy house shoes.

  • Jackie Kemper
    3 months ago

    I have to agree with Misscourtnie23. I put LVP in my sunroom. The thing I don’t care for is the sound as you walk over it. It sounds like plastic! It doesn’t sound or feel like walking on wood.

  • Chessie
    3 months ago

    Jackie Kemper That is due to the specific product and installation that you had done. I have LVP in my kitchen and wood in my dining room. Neither is a floating floor - LVP is glue-down and wood is nailed. I have never noticed any difference in the sound or feel when walking from one to the other (just tried it a minute ago and really it is the same).

  • silken1
    3 months ago

    The quality and brand of LVP also play a big role in how flat it looks and how it scratches and dents. The stuff I have does not scratch and dent. Never one scratch or dent in a few years now. I do put felt pads under all furniture just so it can move easily and not scratch. Mine has a slight sheen to it also. People have told me what a gorgeous hard wood floor I have! I am not even trying to fake a wood floor. It is just what worked for us and I don't regret it at all.

  • Tim
    3 months ago

    Jackie is correct.  There are different types of LVT.  The stuff you get at Lowe's is the cheap floating floor kind that snaps together.  The good stuff; the "real" stuff is the kind that you glue down with acrylic grout (glue).  You have to staple down a 1/4 inch underlayment and then glue the LVT to it.  It is more expensive than the Lowe's knock-off but much better quality that looks and feels like real wood.

  • Cindy Guy Bellwood
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    I don't know about it being the glue down. We paid more at Shaw for the luxury plant flooring than high end carpeting. The thicker it is the longer the warranty on most. Ours is floating and the underlayment is made on it. Lowe's has the thinner product with half the warranty on it. I don't guess ours is clicky as someone called it since we have plenty of funiture on top of it.







  • Cindy Guy Bellwood
    3 months ago

    We want it in our other two bedrooms and master bath.


  • Cindy Guy Bellwood
    3 months ago



  • Cindy Guy Bellwood
    3 months ago



  • Cindy Guy Bellwood
    3 months ago

    This is Shaw Vinyl Style No. 502SA Color No. 00676 LARGO PLUS CAPLONE

  • Jackie Kemper
    3 months ago

    Tim - Now I’m going to have to look at our contractor‘a info on what kind of LVT we had installed! I know it wasn’t Lowe’s. I love the education you get on HOUZZ!

  • Tim
    3 months ago

    Jackie, my brother installed the floating floor type of vinyl plank flooring in his house, and although it resembles wood, it still looks, feels, and sounds like plastic.  Luxury Vinyl Tile (not to be confused with plank vinyl flooring) MUST be glued down to an underlayment with acrylic grout/glue.  It looks, feels, and sounds like real wood.  The floating floor vinyl plank flooring is a lot cheaper than true Luxury Vinyl Flooring.  

    FYI contractors often use the term Luxury Vinyl Tile when referring to vinyl plank flooring, but they are not the same thing.  They do the same thing with linoleum and sheet vinyl flooring.  They are also two completely different products.  Hope this helps.

  • Daisy K
    3 months ago

    If you are going to go through all the trouble of gluing acrylic grout down and stapling down a 1/4 inch underlayment and then gluing the LVT to it. Why not just get a natural product and staple it to a subfloor? The sounds produced by flooring are made by how you lay it down, agreed, but the isnt a main selling point of LVT that it can be floated anywhere? Why would anyone want to do all that for vinyl? wouldnt that be a nightmare to replace later on?

  • Chessie
    3 months ago

    " isnt a main selling point of LVT that it can be floated anywhere"


    No. At least it was never that for me since I never wanted a floating floor. It was maintenance, and better resistance to water spills or any other sort of spill. And my LVT has turned out to be exactly what I had hoped for.

  • Tim
    3 months ago

    The LVT product is 100% waterproof, and if glue down properly, is leak proof. Real wood is neither of these. Also a floating LVT floor is not guaranteed to be leak proof.

  • Mary Kuffner
    3 months ago
    last modified: 3 months ago

    I just had Mannington adura max installed - they look lovey but when you walk on them they feel like plastic. They are extremely sturdy and scratch resistant and will not expand and contract like my wood floors did (they were quite warped when I took them out). I live in a high rise condo. I am high enough up that the building sways a little - that drove me to select LVP but my feet are yearning for the feel of wood. I had them installed as a floating floor because I wanted a more cushioned feel but when you walk on them they sound like plastic. To get rid of that, you have to get glue down or maybe try cork backed floors.

  • OC Kitchen
    3 months ago

    @silken1 (or anyone else) - what type of LVP do you have that you love? I have gotten tons of samples, and love the thicker products by Shaw and Coretec - but the higher end (and thicker) LVPs seem to have a wide ("enhanced") bevel which to me makes the LVP look even more "fake" - less like wood. I would love to find a thick, high end LVP with a micro bevel. I'd appreciate any input and guidance. Thank you!

  • Daisy K
    3 months ago

    Wood can be all those things and more if you take care of it. And it can last a lifetime. LvP may last 20 years Not to mention the junk pile of never fully decomposing matter it will leave behind. Its something to consider too.

  • silken1
    3 months ago

    @\ Ours was XL Flooring XL Flooring for our tV room at home and their sister company EZLay flooring for the entire cabin. Same quality with both companies but one had a different width and colour choices of planks. Ours is loose lay (can be glued down) and has never been a problem. also contrary to what some say, it does not let water seep thru the cracks if installed tightly and correctly. very little waste as the planks can be rotated to make pattern look different and it results in much less cut off wastage. I ordered too much not realizing that. I did a lot of research and it is very good quality. extremely durable. Ours still looks like new after a number of years. UI expoect it will last longer than 20 years suggested by some since there is just no wearing down of it. If you did have a flood, you could lift it up, replace subfloor if there was damage and re-use it. But even setting two pieces together on the counter without anything holding them in place, no water seeped thru the joint after 1/2 hour of leaving it there.