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sunsetsammy

The truth about concrete countertops

sunsetsammy
14 years ago

If you are considering concrete for your countertops you've probably done a fair bit of research and reading. You've probably heard about all the pros and cons. It seems there are very few people with concrete countertops who will actually tell you the truth about what its like living with them. Maybe it's pride. Nobody wants to admit they've made a wrong choice or decision. If you are thinking about going this route please read the following. Concrete countertops are not for everyone!

After spending almost an entire year researching and learning about concrete countertops I finally took the plunge on this exciting DIY project. I am an aircraft mechanic/builder and I admit that I'm somewhat of a perfectionist.

There are many different ways to do concrete countertops but I settled on Cheng's way. I had the video which I borrowed from a friend and it was an excellent tool. His method works well and the countertops fit nicely and are very strong and have yet to crack. I won't go into the details about the creation of the counters only the finished results.

I decided on a charcoal grey colour and liked the flat look without exposing aggregate. This took away the final step of grinding with diamond pads which seems time consuming and expensive.

I settled on a water-based acrylic sealer. Deciding on a sealer was extremely time consuming and frustrating. I made a crap load of test slabs which I used for testing. I tested EIGHT DIFFERENT sealers in total. Every one I could find in the local area. I spent a lot of money doing this but it didn't matter. I wanted to get it right the first time. After consulting a professional concrete countertop guy in town he told me that he was using water-based acrylics. He said they weren't perfect (no sealer is) but when it came time to re-apply they were the least offensive. After my trials with the other sealers I can see his point. Some of these sealers have some very strong odors that are not good for you or your family to breathe

My experiences with all these sealers were very different from the claims made on the bottles, the sales people who sold them to me, and the companies I actually called directly. I even went as far to try different methods of application with these sealers to see if that would make a difference to their effectiveness.

With all my test slabs done and sealed, I proceeded to apply small dabs of the different sauces/liquids that would most likely come in contact with the countertops.

Red Wine

Ketchup

Mustard

Vinegar

Water

Pop

Beer

Soy sauce

Lemon juice

Olive oil

Salsa

and probably a couple more I can't remember

I applied three drops of each item onto each sealed slab. I used three time intervals

1 minute, 1 hour, and 1 day.

After each interval I wiped off one of the three drops to see if the individual item had penetrated the sealer and caused a stain.

My results were mixed. I tested 8 sealers in total. (With the different application methods there were well over 12 test slabs.) 4 were penetrating sealers which sink into the surface and apparently prevent anything else from doing so. The other 4 were top sealers which actually form a thin layer on top of the surface.

Most of the sealers performed well with the 1 minute test. After 1 hour, more than 2/3rds of the sealers failed. The overnight test resulted in pretty much EVERY sealer failing to some degree. Red wine, vinegar, soy sauce, and olive oil seemed to be the worst.

In general the penetrating sealers did not perfom well at all. In fact most of them didn't even pass the 1 hour test. (Some even failed the 1 minute test!) By far the top coat sealers out performed the penetrating type.

I chose the best of the best top sealers which surprisingly was one of the cheaper ones I tested. (They are all fairly expensive.) The most expensive one, which I was told was the BEST SEALER MONEY CAN BUY actually performed the worst. What a waste!

Scratch tests proved to be a total failure with ALL the sealers despite claims to the contrary.

Beeswax/Carnuba wax did nothing to help either test.

Anyhow...

I sealed my countertops using the best sealer, applied some beeswax (I don't know why) and installed them in the kitchen. They were absolutely beautiful. The HUGE (and I cannot express that enough) amount of time I spent working on these countertops had really paid off. They were stunning and perfect. Everyone who came over to my house was absolutely amazed. I was very proud of my accomplishment and I encouraged everyone that concrete countertops were the way to go!

One year later...

The counters still look pretty damn good. Are they perfect? Absolutely not! Plenty of stains and scratches everywhere. It didn't take too long to get the first couple of stains. You (and your family) have to completly change your attitude about working in your kitchen. As soon as you spill something you have to wipe it up immediately. After you are finished cooking you have to wipe all the counters before you eat! Especially the one by the stove where grease and oil splatter. You will be surprised at how much stuff gets dripped and splattered while cooking. You never notice it with your laminate countertops but your concrete ones will tell you in the morning.

If you have people over for dinner you have to watch their every move. Does that wine bottle have a little drip running down the side? You can't slide things on the counter or it will scratch. I began using wooden cutting boards as a work surface to prevent damage. I had a couple of them sitting permanently in high use areas. Big mistake. Something leeched out of the wood and left big stains on my counter! A toaster with black rubber nubbies on the bottom left permanent marks as well.

You quickly begin to realize that concrete is a terrible surface to try and keep looking pristine and new. Although it is tough and durable it is ever changing in terms of appearance. You HAVE to be aware of this before you decide on concrete counters. If you want countertops that will look great and new for a long time then concrete is NOT for you. I see many people describe the wear of their concrete countertops as "patina". In my mind patina means "it looks bad!" I KNOW that 2-3 years from now my countertops will look terrible. I can tell that already. It makes me sad, but it is true.

In my opinion concrete is too porous for use as a kitchen countertop. Other applications may be fine. Did I use the wrong sealer? Maybe. I know of 3 other people who also have concrete counters and they used other sealers. Even some ones I didn't test. Their counters stain and scratch just like mine. I hear that Cheng's sealer works very well. I'd have to see it to believe it after everything I've gone thru. Apparently there are new polyurethane sealers that perform very well. Application is very difficult from what I hear and if you screw it up you have a problem. Not to mention the health hazards.

Sorry for the rant but this morning I discovered a new stain on my countertops and I can't stand it. I have to warn other people who are considering going with concrete.

If you do decide on concrete make sure you are the type of person who doesn't fret over the details. If you actually like things to look worn and used then concrete might be okay for you. If you like to use words like "rustic" and "patina" to make you feel better about the sorry state of things then that's okay too.

If you are a perfectionist like me and you like things looking good all the time (especially things you've put a TON of work into OR spent A LOT of $$$ on) THEN CONCRETE COUNTERTOPS ARE NOT FOR YOU!!! Trust me...

(If after reading this you are still convinced you want concrete then take this 2nd piece of advice. Don't permanently attach them to your cabinets. They are heavy enough that they won't go anywhere.)

Comments (134)

  • avb015
    4 years ago

    I couldn't agree more. It seems like a wonderful product. 7 years later I am hysterical over any stains and I hate reapplying layers of acrylic. It is too much maintenance for a family with little kids.

  • SWAN
    3 years ago

    If you use a good epoxy, all but the most brutal scratches can easily be buffed out with a cloth. My current tops have been in for two years and suffer under the daily abuse of three teenage boys. My wife is still in love with them. Imo, epoxy is the way to go. Just be sure to get a good UV and heat resistant brand.

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  • Elaine Wilt
    3 years ago
    We had concrete counter tops applied in or kitchen and on or fireplace in 2003. We choose a charcoal blended with dark green. We felt we were on the cutting edge of a clean contemporary designed kitchen. I’m afraid we didn’t really do our home work. I love to cook and bake and within a year the counter tops in the kitchen were really stained. However the the fireplace has held up well. Not to mention my husband was not great at maintaining them.
    I’m afraid that if you have a real life with kids, and cooking concrete counter tops might be better elsewhere in you home.
    I’m now trying to figure out what to do with my kitchen counter tops. We’ve been unable to find someone to repair them in our area. Has anyone tried to refurbish there concrete counter tops?
    We live in the beach area south of Los Angeles.
  • hurleyannd
    3 years ago

    I moved to a house with a concrete countertop. Could not get it clean and tried everything We finally ripped it out and put in a beautiful stone countertop. It does not stain, always looks beautiful. No one should use these things in a kitchen. I think this "trend" was a scam.

  • cluelessincolorado
    3 years ago

    Huh, I love my concrete counter tops, I truly do. Then again, I am tough on surfaces and I really appreciate the fact that I NEVER even think about babying or protecting my counter from my work. Mine came with the house when we purchased it, but they must have been properly sealed because they wipe clean, I can scrub them, and they don't stain. I do love a patina - so I think it's down to proper installation and a good dose of "beauty is in the eye of the beholder"

  • cevamal
    3 years ago

    I think it's more an issue of "beauty is in the skill of the installer".

  • cluelessincolorado
    3 years ago

    Good one cevamal!

  • Brad
    3 years ago
    We had a concrete countertop installed by a concrete surface company and in the year we had it we abused it like crazy and it looked like the day we bought it.

    That being said, they make dedicated countertops and it was almost as expensive per foot as my Cambria.
  • Sheila Rumsey
    3 years ago
    Sounds like it has a lot to do with your desired overall look and your expectations of the material. I am thinking really hard about doing concrete to save money. It would be pour in place, ground, and sealed with tung oil. Seems to me that grinding it down to expose some aggregate hides a lot of imperfections, and tung oil is a fabulous waterproofing agent for wood and stone. I will be using it on the hickory cabinets, too. Of course, we are going for a pretty rustic look with a bit of industrial farmhouse. I live with a man who won’t take his shoes off and is very hard on things, so I have adopted the strategy of camouflage the imperfections rather than fight an uphill battle in keeping things looking new. If you like smooth glossy perfection, many “natural” materials will likely not appeal. If you want durable, no-fuss, casual, and you aren’t afraid of a few imperfections, then concrete is a better fit. It’s also very budget friendly if you don’t mind using your PTO time and getting a good workout.
  • Michelle Santucci
    3 years ago

    Thank you so very much for your honest and detailed congratulations experience. I had 3 tabletops made for outdoor use (2 with the expensive and time intensive process of exposing the aggregate which I don’t care for) and just applied a water based sealer by Glaze ‘N Seal. Clearly states repels water based stains. Now I know concrete kitchen counters are not for me. I don’t mind some patina, but would not like to see red wine or oil stains. I’m considering applying a wax to give the table tops just a bit of silkiness to the hand and sheen (not shine). Any suggestions on what (relatively easy) product to use?

  • souzim
    2 years ago

    Im doing my kitchen countertop myself and am wondering what type of cement should I buy? I know of quickrete cement but I'm ready to consider other cement that has better flow and reduces the amount of bubbles on the surface as even with vibration, you can still get bubbles. is there a special technique or product that can minimize the bubbles? thx!

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    2 years ago

    You're not buying cement; you're buying concrete. You do not "pour" concrete, you "place" it. Google Buddy Rhodes and Cheng please.

  • souzim
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    @Joseph Corlett, LLC I admit I’m a beginner at this and may have used wrong terminology. There’s no need to be snarky as I’m sure you understood what I meant regardless.

  • Aglitter
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    @souzim Concrete countertops were a neat idea. Many people who have used them regret them. I'd do a bit more research before finalizing plans. It might be an option if you have a very oddly-shaped countertop in a home where replacement isn't out of the question if you end up with damage long-term to the counters. Experts with whom I talked tried to discourage me from them, and these are people who even had them in their high-end kitchen showrooms. "Yes, we put concrete counters in our showroom, but we don't recommend this," was the idea, as they pointed to chipping on the edges everywhere.

  • souzim
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    @baleria, thanks for your advice. I am aware of the problems with concrete counters regarding Stains, cracks, chipping, etc.. I’m looking into Surecretes Xtreme series to hopefully minimize the cracking/ chipping since it’s supposed to have over 10,000 psi structural strength as well as very high flexural strength. The stains and scratches are an inevitable maintenance issue with concrete countertops. the only countertop that will be in concrete is my kitchen island which will be a combination of concrete and wood. It will be ”easy” to replace if ever I start to regret my choice;) the rest of my counters close to the stove, are in granite. This project is for my cottage and the imperfections that will develope in the concrete will work well with the whole design of the kitchen. My main concern was having these bubbles that Ive noticed on a lot of photos of concrete countertops even the ones done by pros. I know that There is a concrete mix (contains Forton-VF and plasticizer) that can be sprayed using a hopper gun and then they use a brush to gently press the concrete. I was wondering if by doing this, they eliminated The need to use a slurry over the counter to fill in the voids. that’s really why I was asking here if there was a preferred concrete mix and technique that produces a nicer finish. The Surecrete’s xtreme mix is more of a milkshake texture and can also be poured and then adapted into the mold as opposed to being pressed only like when you use the regular quickrete concrete. So it makes me wonder if this mix also minimizes these surface voids.

  • Aglitter
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    I don't know about concrete bubbles, but I know with varnish you should never shake it before application or you will get bubbles. I don't know if you can mix this concrete product and then let it sit a while before applying or not, probably not. You might look into an actual foam roller to roll down the top layer. Brushing varnish can still create bubbles, so the brush itself isn't a foolproof solution, I wouldn't think, even for concrete. On the pouring question, I would think you could still get air bubbles with pouring. The bubbles come from the mixing process as well as application. If you wouldn't be content with bubbles, again, consider another option. Soapstone is a rustic surface. Wood is fabulous for a kitchen island, so I'm glad you at least have partial plans for that. You may love the idea of concrete right now, but be sure you'll love it in the same way as you do now if it shows irreparable craze lines and chipping. These could be more than "imperfections" or "maintenance issues" to you in time. As people in this thread have noted, some of the damages cannot be repaired without extensive resurfacing which could jeopardize your home via dust in vents and in cabinetry hinges and drawer slides. Sealant, as others have noted, is rarely a foolproof method for totally preventing etching on concrete. Genuine marble would be an easier product to resurface and get looking nice again, and marble is such an age-old surface for countertops in world history. Pouring concrete yourself is quite an investment of time and money, so I doubt you would find it desirable to replace very soon if you were disappointed. Ultimately it is up to you the amount of risk you want to shoulder, and there are some other high-maintenance countertop surfaces that are also rustic but don't have quite the level of risk that concrete does. I could definitely see a dark granite perimeter with marble island with an inset wood butcher block being a perfectly rustic solution for a cottage.

  • Donna Johansen
    2 years ago

    Thank you so much. This was exactly the information I was looking for. I love the look of concrete counter tops, but with two teenagers and a chef in the kitchen, I am thinking there is a better way to go. Moving on.....

  • djmcountercrete
    2 years ago

    I have done concrete countertops professionally for almost 8 years and am willing to offer any help on the subject I can it’s a very steep learning curve that me and my father now have down to a science.

  • souzim
    2 years ago

    @djmcountercrete, Hi, I recently took up the courage to do my countertops in concrete. I definitely agree this is a lot trickier than it Looks! I do need some help on the last and, in my humble opinion, the most important step. It’s the sealing of the concrete. I am testing two different brands and nothing seems to stop acids like vinegar from eroding the sealer along with some cement/grout layer. It leaves behind an obvious mark and rough texture. I’m wondrring if you have found a good sealer that is resistant to acid stains and ofcourse all other food stains. thank you!

  • HU-273908296
    2 years ago

    Thank You for this extensive review. We purchased a house two years ago and there are concrete counter tops on the kitchen island and in both bathrooms. Initially, I was super excited because I like the look but I very quickly discovered all of the drawbacks and would NEVER recommend concrete counter tops to anyone! They pit easily and food crumbs get trapped and they stain super easily- even wheat newly sealed. Oil, red wine, and other things penetrate the surface and create very unsightly stains. I’m constantly wiping them down but it seems they always have a new stain every month and the stains are close to impossible to clean! I like clean look so I do not appreciate this aspect at all! im robbed of the enjoyment of them because I’m constantly paranoid that normal use will create more stains. If I had the money, I’d rip all of them out in an instant and replace with a non porous material. I am considering repairing them as much as possible and resealing with epoxy. Has anyone had good luck doing this?

  • Davious Allen
    2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    The OP proves the point, LEAVE IT TO THE PROFESSIONALS......he spent a year researching and allegedly performed all kinds of test without even knowing what to test. He even states he used the "best of the best" (who was the expert who determined it was the "best of the best"?). And WOW, he tested 8 sealers.....What exactly did that prove? NOTHING!!! It's not just about being a self proclaimed perfectionist (I am), it comes down to knowing what you are doing, he doesn't or at least didn't (as evidenced by his verbose diatribe). I can tell the OP hasn't a clue what he is talking about, all he discusses are sealers, the creation isn't important only the finished results? REALLY?..... I may have missed where he states he consulted with 10 of the leading concrete counter top fabricators in his area/state/country and visited their shops, perhaps he did and simply didn't learn anything. He even mentions that people who are happy with concrete countertops must in fact be lying, or is it because they hired a professional and their concrete countertops are like mine, BEAUTIFUL and like new after 10+ years. The fact is a pro can make concrete countertops perform as well as granite for a lifetime; one simply needs to know what they are doing. I started making them 30 years ago (master cabinet / furniture maker / contractor for 1/2 century) and it's all about knowing what products to use, what ratios, procedures, etc. There are people like myself who have a lifetime of knowledge as well as doing and we still learn everyday. I blame the internet and TV shows that take 50 years of knowledge and proclaim "ANYONE CAN DO IT" just research the internet and one will find the answers to every project, problem or ........I'm sure it's exciting being a DIYer (I know plenty of them) and then when you get into trouble, call a professional to bail you out of your screw up. Here, we have an "article" written by a NEOPHYTE (ZERO EXPERIENCE) informing others about his journey into the world of concrete countertops.....BLAH,BLAH,BLAH....He wasted his time writing it while many others wasted their time reading it, some, perhaps learned, HIRE A PROFESSIONAL and then it's possible you will be happy with your concrete countertops. Why bother giving a neophyte's opinion and recommending others not do or do something? Does the OP believe that he knows everything about concrete countertops since he read about them and made ONE (1)?

    There are times it's less expensive if you spend more!!!

    Good luck.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    2 years ago

    Epoxy looks good on the day it's applied, not so much afterward.

  • rpiper358
    2 years ago

    Just covered our 1960's speckled, ugly, very worn countertops with Henry's Featherweight concrete. I used 511 impregnator sealer.

    Not certain how it will look in the long run.

    I've researched and read many articles and the above products are what I decided to go with.

    Concrete wasn't my first choice but we bought a fixer upper and when we had a water leak it resulted in a bathroom remodel so it was either diy concrete counters ir the ugly ones. For less than $200 the crete won.

    1st picture is after I used 1/4 bottle of the 511 sealant. The 2nd picture is 4 hours later. Please ignore the tile. I was trying to find something inexpensive to use as a backspkash but will live with a plain wall until I can find something I like.

    I have frosted cakes but have never done concrete. The featherweight worked well for me.


    approx. 4hrs after sealant applied. The feather weight coating slurped it up! I used 1/4 bottle until it finally would bead!


  • souzim
    2 years ago

    SO here is the finished she’s result of my DIY project concrete countertop island but kitchem not yet finished;) I absolutely love it and couldn’t be happier!! they dont stain and are absolutely gorgeous !


  • souzim
    2 years ago



  • souzim
    2 years ago



  • souzim
    2 years ago



  • souzim
    2 years ago

    My experience with this DIY is that you end up having a lot of respect for the pros as this is not as easy as it may seem especially if you care about detail. Also, every step of the way matters and needs to be done perfectly. Mine have a few glitches but not noticeable at all. I went for a cream finish and followed the instructions from Jeff Girard at the concrete countertop institue and even used his Omega sealer which does the job perfectly. I liked his method and his attention to detail. Everything was explained in detail.

    good Luck to those who still want to try but be warned that you will need lots of time patience and trial and errors to go through before you have a good result!

  • taliaferro
    2 years ago

    Gorgeous!

  • Susan L
    last year

    Looking for advice to address water spots in my concrete. A few months ago, I covered a cultured marble sink/vanity (single piece) In powder room with Ardex. I applied several thins coats, allowing to dry a day between coats.


    I brushed on 3 coats of 511 Impregnator Sealer first, following the directions and waited 24 hours between each coat. I then brushed on 3 coats of the Safecoat Acrylacq 24 hours apart according to the directions.


    A few days later, several darkened spots would appear when wet. I let the surface dry for 2 days then tried another coat of acrylaq, same results a few days later. Desperate, I lightly sanded and applied a few coats of polycrylic. That worked well for a few months but now the spots are back... And getting larger over time. When the surface dries, the spots lighten up, so clearly the sealant layer is compromised since water is getting under. I have no idea what to do next? Apply a new layer of Ardex and start over? Sand what I have and recoat?

    The vanity doesn't come in contact with food or blunt objects, but it's a sink in a powder room, so is obviously wet a lot. Wiping the sink dry everytime we wash our hands isn't an option. Any advice? I love the look, but and exasperated!

  • souzim
    last year

    Hi Susan, I haven’t tried your sealants when I was testing several different sealers for my kitchen concrete countertop. What I have found is that a lot of them didn’t live up to what they claim to do. The sealer that I finally ended up trusting and now loving is the Omega sealer. It’s is amazing...I don’t have any stains whatsoever and I have my sink in the middle of the countertop with lots of water and food prep and no problem at all. It’s a Matt finish to top it off so you don’t see it once it’s applied. You can learn more about it at the concrete countertop institute. It was developed by Jeff Girard specifically for concrete countertops. You probably will have to sand down The areas that are problematic and either try a new sealer or the same ones you’re using and test again. However, depending on the finish you have on your concrete, make sure you dont over sand especially if you have à créma finish .

  • Susan L
    last year

    Thanks, @souzim! Wondering out loud if its easier/preferable to sand problem areas or build up with new layer of Ardex. Hmm. I'll research to see if there will be any issues with the Omega sealer on top of the polycrylic. I suspect there will be, in which case, sanding down through the layers of polycrylic and Acrylaque may exceed my skill set. especially over the inside of the round sink.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last year

    Susan:


    Your application of Ardex over cultured marble is doomed. It was an inexpensive attempt, and good on ya for taking a shot, but I urge you to not invest any more time and material into this.

  • Aglitter
    last year
    last modified: last year

    @Susan L I'll be getting a new soapstone countertop for one of my bathrooms next week, and I like that material for bathrooms because soapstone isn't porous like some other natural stones so doesn't need sealant and holds up well against water, particularly if you have acidic tap water, since some other natural stones may etch when in contact with acidic water. If you ever think of re-doing the countertop entirely, you might look into soapstone. You can usually find local fabricators with remnants for small areas, which is precisely what I'm doing, so you won't need to purchase a full slab. Quartz is similar in terms of water resistance with no need for sealant but doesn't have the high heat resistance that soapstone does in case anyone in your home uses high-heat styling tools in the bathroom.

  • Davious Allen
    last year

    Just remember, though it's not porous it truly acts like it is. Lots of people believe it is because of how much it changes appearance.

  • PRO
    Bella Terra LLC Hydro-seed
    last year

    For the 1st time ever, we just wet sanded/polish our 17 YEAR OLD CONCRETE DYI kitchen countertops. They are beautiful! We have a large family and in any given week we probably feed 50 single serving meals. These have held up through massive amounts of meals.

    If your a perfectionist, these aren't for you. We sealed ours with a mixture of 1/2 mineral spirts & 1/2 linseed, which was what we did originally. This time I plan on topping them with bees wax.

  • souzim
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Hi, so I have a crack on my counter which happen because of Many factors: mainly the type of concrete we used and it was poured too thin at 1”. there is no water leak there. I am wondering if anyone can give me suggestions on how to minimize the appearance of the crack. the counter is very stable otherwise and has no other issues. I have already sealed the whole counter with omega sealer about 6months ago. thank you! sorry the photo is attached below.

  • souzim
    last year



  • Aglitter
    last year
    last modified: last year

    That's quite a large crack, but even so, it may be hard for any grout or concrete look-alike product to stick in there permanently as a certain amount of surface area is needed to hold on to those materials. You could do an epoxy or marine sealant and get a waterproof seal that would hold, but it wouldn't match. It looks like a small section. It could be your support system underneath was not substantial enough to prevent the cracking there, so you will need to check that first or the repair will merely crack again.

  • souzim
    last year

    Hi Silverlined, thx for the feedback. the crack is sealed well actually, no water leaks at all and it happened during installation as we lifted it wrong and as I had mentionned, this concrete doesn’t have great flexing ability. I’m not worried about the structure as it’s supported well. I was told by the company that I bought the concrete from to actually put a fault line right there when pouring the concrete and have like a steel sheet as a separation between the slabs at the most fragile area which is the mid border of the sink. I didn’t follow instructions and voila I got this crack. I was wondering if I actually opened up the crack superficially and kinda widened the surface area and then filled it in with grout if that would work. I realize the color would be very difficult to match but figured maybe I could try a very small section first.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last year

    Retrofit an apron front sink please. The crack will be nonexistent.

  • Kristen P
    last year

    Advice on removing concrete countertops? I recently bought a house with diy concrete tops (that look pretty rough) and want to remove the concrete, without damaging the base cabinets.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last year

    Sledgehammer.

  • Cindy McGinnis
    last year

    Has anyone covered a concrete countertop with another material? And with what result?

  • Aglitter
    last year

    You might get by with epoxy but the offgassing indoors would be undesirable if that is the location. Most epoxy coatings are recommended for outdoor, garage, or basement spaces.

  • Cindy McGinnis
    last year

    I was hoping that there might be a thin solid surface type product. The concrete counter in the kitchen in the house that I bought is pitted, stained and dark brown. Replacing it would be a messy project and I’m not sure that any treatment to the current counter will yield good results.

  • Aglitter
    last year

    Sounds like you might want to consider a total remodel. Kitchens only have a certain lifespan, and sometimes it is truly easier just to gut and redo.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last year

    "Has anyone covered a concrete countertop with another material?"


    No, but that's an awful idea, just like concrete makes an awful countertop.


    "And with what result?"


    Not good long term, trust me.

  • Carrie Croft
    7 months ago

    Perfectly sums it up. I thought they looked good when we bought and now I am like - how do we get these out of here?

  • Aglitter
    7 months ago

    I'm sorry for your troubles. Concrete has largely fallen out of the discussion for countertops except maybe for some outdoor kitchen projects where contractors push them because they are more familiar with concrete for other elements like pools than stone countertops as a specialty.