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eldemila

What Style Kitchen Using These Cabinets? PICS

14 years ago

I've posted pictures of the kitchen in the house we're buying the end of this month in other posts, but still, I have no conrete ideas of what to do with this kitchen. I'm really trying to find some way to keep the cabinets and the soffts and incorporate them in to a kitchen I'll be happy with. I've found only 1 small partial picture of a kitchen with cabinets like these in a book - my hours and hours of searching on the internet have been fruitless.

I'm thinking if I can find a style and work on trying to put elements of that style in to this kitchen, maybe it would be helpful?

French Provincial? Country French? Tuscan? 1960's Era? Paint color? Countertop type? Lighting fixture (flourescent ceiling up there now and one bulb above sink) Flooring ideas, other than wood?

Any ideas??

I've posted the link to one of my original posts that show all the kitchen pictures. Any and all help is ALWAYS greatly appreciated!

Here is a link that might be useful: Old Post

Comments (32)

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    My first thought was they were from the "Mediterranean" style of the 60's. Couldn't find anything searching on that probably because it's not a style people want to remember.

    Don't know if you saw this, but here's someone with similar cabinets. Some of the responses might help you as well.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Help outdated cabinets

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    After more searching, they could also be "Colonial." Still not finding anything that would be more helpful.

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  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    That clipped corner moulding is often called french provincial, but to me it is just kind of a 1960s applied moulding that is a bit fancier than mitered corners. Hollywood Regency style also used this corner, and sometimes used it as two half circles around a central knob (sometimes with starburst escutcheon... which is also kind of "atomic" to further add to the confusion).

    Its a kind of a country version of Hollywood Regency, especially with the "hammered" colonial hardware (Just like there are vernacular versions of Chippendale).

    I like it in your house because it seems to fit the house so well. The Yield sign wall color from the PO does not do it any favors.

    Linoleum Floor? Checkerboard Tile? Really monolithic vinyl would be period but I don't even know that it exists anymore. Amtico vinyltile is based in Europe so they still have these types of options,(want sparkles? they have it:)--but they are pricey for vinyl, and have limited distributors I think.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I don't know what the original intent of the design was, but today, the cabinets say "country vacation cabin". For now, all I'd do is change the yellow paint to an off-white or maybe a clay red-like the color of those napkins. I would think gingham or stripes would do well for curtains, etc. and a few stoneware crocks might look good on the counters. I'd replace appliances as they break and save for big overhaul someday. But all sorts of other house repair issues might pop up that first year so I wouldn't spend on non-necessities until you you won't need to spend money elsewhere.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    What Palimpsest said. Country knock off of Hollywood Regency.

    It depends on what kind of style you like.

    Are those recessed panels? Or is it an applied molding?

    Homage to Hollywood Regency has been stylish these last several years. It's post mid-century modern. You could really play that up.

    The first thing I'd do is give them a really good scrub. Do you have the patience to remove the old varnish, nicely? Revarnishing could do lots for them. Or prep them with some TSP or something (depending on what you do to them) and rub some gilding creme into the curves. Maybe even a little around the edges.

    Thinking on it, I wouldn't do much more to them. You don't want them to look cheesy.

    Rather than the sparkle vinyl authenticity, how about an homage using a bright color of Marmoleum? There are so many really great colors. I bet those cabinets could stand up to Asian Tiger. Or this green mix:

    The breakfast room walls are really crying for vintage wallpaper, but I wouldn't do it. It'll make the room look smaller. Instead, go for a really fresh, light color.

    {{gwi:1605657}}

    Just remember, when all else fails, go gold! (Like on the soffits...)

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Thanks Steff! I appreciate that link, very close cousins, those cabinets! I hadn't seen it.

    Honestly, I've searched and searched for pictures. I guess by using the wording that I think it should be, I've limited myself. Maybe I should just put "old cabinets" I've tried 1960's, 60's, 1970's, 70's, vintage, provincial, provencal, provencial, country French, everything I could imagine.

    Rockler's website states them to be French Provincial.

    I just want to come up with something concrete so when I get up there at the closing I'll have some type of idea of what to do. At this point, I have nothing at all.

    Thanks for giving me a hand in trying to look, I really appreciate it!

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    If that's applied moulding, I'd look into removing the moulding, clean with TSP, sand off the old varnish, and then wax/poly them again with a more satin finish. I wouldn't put too much $$ in since with any kind of remodel; you'd probably want to change the cooktop location.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Those cabinets remind me of the ones in the house I grew up in! Rock-solid, they lasted more than 40 years and were still in perfect structural condition when the new owners ripped them out. (They're birch, by the way.) Dated? Yeah. But if you're house poor, I can think of many better places to spend your money fixing things that need to be fixed that you don't even know about yet. Wait until there's a pile of extra cash before tackling this one. And by then, you'll know what does and does not work for you layout wise.

    Though I don't have photos, about 30 years into that 40+ year lifespan, my father refinished our cabinets. I don't know what he used (and sadly, he's not around to ask) but they came out beautiful. But yours look like the finish is already in pretty good shape though...

    In terms of style, I'd go with the flow and definitely NOT paint them. What you have is good stock -- out of fashion at present, but possibly as 'in fashion' 20 years from now as the 1930's stuff is now. So don't fight it; go with it instead.

    To make the most of it, I'd also think 1960's rural-suburb country. Clean lines, warm colors, natural and earthy with a bit of high tech thrown in for balance. And yes, vinyl on the floor and laminate on the countertops would be most period appropriate. Did you ever see any of the 'I Love Lucy' episodes when the lived in Connecticut? Or dig out some classic movies from the late 1950's to mid 1960's. Maybe some Life magazines?

    Bottom line -- I actually like it.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Hollywood Regency? So now we know, gold wallpaper and gold flecked countertops.

    You're welcome on the link, debelli. Hope it helps.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I could be alone in this opinion, but I think those cabinets are kind of cool! I don't like the finish, but if you are thinking of a cosmetic fix until you do a larger remodel, I think you could make that kitchen really cute while you wait.

    I think you could glam it up in there. This might sound crazy, but maybe go with a bright vintage color like turquoise on the walls. Paint the cabinets a creamy white and glaze the molding that makes the design on the doors. Remove that piece of wood above the kitchen sink (blanking on the name... cornice?). Maybe take off some of the lower cabinet doors, like under the sink and put in curtains with a cute vintage fabric.

    Go with a simple light laminate (maybe gray) on the coutners, or stay with the white that is there and a black and white check on the floor.

    Just one lady's opinion, but sometimes going with what you have instead of trying to turn it into something it is not, will look more authentic. Can't wait to see what you do!

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    This may not be what you want to hear, but you don't really need to drive yourself crazy before you even move into the house. I've posted a link below to a thread we had going back in November regarding how long most people on here waited to renovate their kitchens. You might be surprised by the answers. The average was around 10 years if I remember correctly.

    Live with it awhile and you'll figure out what's really bad, and what you actually like.

    Here is a link that might be useful: How Long did You Wait To Renovate Your Kitchen?

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    These pieces, all from 1stDibs, show how things overlap:

    Real French Provincial, c. 1780, as opposed to French Provincial Revival:
    {{gwi:1605659}}

    Tommi Parzinger, H'wood Reg'y, clipped corners to make a circle:
    {{gwi:1605661}}

    Hollywood Regency Asian Moderne style:
    {{gwi:1605664}}

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    LOL! Palimpsest, I love that last chest. Hollywood Chinese non-Chippendale?

    Gild everything!!

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    My old St. Charles kitchen had wood uppers that were kissin' cousins to yours. Even the light fixture looked similar! I can tell you that the old kitchen was put in in 1964 and at the time the PO had put in expensive, top of the line appliances and had everything custom decorated - she would never have put in anything considered cheap looking.

    You are very fortunate to have stylized cabinetry that matches the time period of your home! Please, please, please do not mess with the original integrity of your kitchen! There is an entire industry built around people trying to restore a PO's "updates". Have fun with color, knobs, appliances, flooring but you have great cabinets - don't screw them up. If you change out the light fixture please store it on the premises - someone someday will be very grateful.

    If you do decide to get into the era with your furniture I think that Early American was one popular style that might work with your cabinets. Think maple Ethan Allen. The wood quality of often very good and you can pick it up for a song before it becomes popular to collect.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I'd live in the house at least 6 months before doing anything. Maybe paint the walls, but get a feel for the work and traffic flows before you start doing things.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Thanks for all the wonderful ideas!
    Palimpset, you're always a wealth of ideas and information! Hollywood Regency is a new one for me, and that cabinet is definitely the style! I wasn't able to find any kitchen cabinets with that style though. Not sure what color those walls will be painted, I'll be busy with color chips and small bottles of paint samples, I'm sure. Any suggestions? Definitely NOT a checkerboard type of gal though it probably would look good in there I must admit. I'll have to photoshop it and see for myself. What type of linoleum did you have in mind, or should I ask what style/color?

    River, thanks for the ideas. I know we have a roof and furnace in our next 5yrs but otherwise everything else looks to be good and anything else would be very unexpected. We had it inspected and anything that needed to be fixed is to be fixed prior to closing. I just think it would be easier to update what we can before we move in. Will be a slow move and would like to have a game plan together for when I return there in March. Have lots of ideas but nothing that is fitting with those cabinets as of yet.

    Pllog, the doors have a raised/applied panel. If patience = saving money, I have it to remove the varnish. It's HOW do I remove the varnish correctly and without messing anything up? How can I play up the post mid-century modern style? I'll be doing a Google search for that style now, I'd looked at mid-century modern, but not post, so maybe there will be more to look at, I hope. I do have some TSP, not that I've ever used it. How to know what product to use? Gilding cream, that's a new one I'll have to look up! Interesting flooring choice. I was thinking something along that line of color but dark. What color is that you thought of for the walls?

    I ran across this article that I thought was interesting:

    http://www.cincinnatimagazine.com/home_garden/article.aspx?id=62050

    RemodelFLA, if I remove the molding, after sanding would you still see the shadow or any indication that the molding had been there? Could another molding be applied to give the cabinet some type of depth if I chose to go that route? I would love to move appliances around but I think if I did that I'd just have to do the whole kitchen over.

    Sweeby, definitely will be house poor after closing and have money set aside to do the updates that will drive me crazy that I have to get done NOW, before we move in (master bathroom is #1) The kitchen is functional but I'd like to get what I can get done in March, before we start moving our stuff up there. It's just so much easier with an empty home, not having to worry about the dirt, dust, etc. Curious to know why you believe the cabinets are birch vs maple. Many have told me they were either birch or maple with more leaning towards them being maple. I won't fight it, I just need some ideas on what to do with it. Keep the period BUT come up with some good ideas on how to use some updated materials in there, or better yet, find a way to bring those cabinets in to the future. 1960's rural-suburb country, that's a new one to me too!

    hmdennis, no, you're not alone, I've had a lot of people who think the cabinets are cool, have begged me not to touch them with paint or ripping them out. I like them too, just not coming up with a good idea of what to do with them.

    biochem, I know with my current kitchen it took me a few years and a lot of ripped out pages of magazines, taking out books from the library and a lot of patience to get my current kitchen. I had one design flaw, but otherwise, it was well worth the wait, so advice is noted. I just know I need to take care of the floor as it's so old the seams are coming apart, and I'd like to do the countertops asap. It's just so much easier when there's nothing in the house to have to work around. Once we are in and settled I'd probably take a good 10yrs too - just to move the stuff out of the kitchen that I've moved in. Much easier if I can have a game plan before moving my stuff in - less work, I think. Thanks for the link!

    Skyedog, thanks for the early American idea, will google that too. I actually have some EA furniture, older looking in my daughters bedroom and modern in my kitchen. Stylized, but what style??? Just need to come up with a concept that's going to work, and what it will work with. Any suggestions with the early American idea?? Wish you had some old pics of your kitchen to show, would love to see it!

    Lazy, I'll sorta of live with it for a few months. Two and a half weeks after closing, go back for about 6 weeks in March/April and then sometime after May back up there for a while. So, while not "technically" 6 months, 6 months will pass between now and with me really spending some quality time in the house. It's just two of us now so not much will take place in the way of foot traffic. If coming through the side entrance of the house, would definitely be passing through the kitchen, but again, just the two of us. Will allow guests to enter the main entrance of the castle;)

    Honestly, I would love to find a kitchen designer who works with old existing kitchen cabinets, who can take on this challenge and has vision on what to do. To me THAT person really would be worth their weight in gold. With the economy as such and people wanting to update their kitchens/bathrooms (okay, many rooms) I just think that that type of person would make a killing. It's so easy to start with a clean slate, rip everything out. What's challenging is having to really work their minds in to what you could do with existing cabinets such as these. I wish a CKD would take on the challenge, wonder if there are any out there that would be brave enough.

    It's hard for me to say what style I am, I really don't have a particular style. I know I don't like modern, and while I like a bit of retro I wouldn't want an entire retro kitchen. I'm don't like country, but Country French is fine. I don't like all white kitchens. I've seen a ton of pictures on the web of kitchens I like, or elements I like in the kitchens, but nothing has come up with a kitchen with cabinets like I'm getting.

    Here's just one of the pics I like, there's oodles of others in my files:

    http://www.aaarchitects.com/images/Oaks/ChaseKitchen.jpg

    The kitchen has to be male friendly. I can't/don't cook, and I get banned from the kitchen unless I'm making bread, but banned when he's cooking. So the kitchen can't be shabby chic in style, though I like that look and he really doesn't care for the total retro, but he tolerates interesting pieces I p/u at garage sales.

    Once I close and find myself standing in the big empty space of a house I'll put on my thinking cap, take more pictures and if I can find a computer signal or get to the library to use the computer there, will be posting more pictures and measurements in the hopes that with all your help and suggestions that I'll be able to make this kitchen in to something wonderful.

    THANKS AGAIN EVERYONE!!!!

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Debelli,

    Interesting article. Nice overview, but way too simplistic, and rather humorless, in its advice.

    I'm really not a refinishing expert. The kitchen side of the cabinets looked gummy to me, like varnish gets when it's old, especially if there's been a lot of smoking in the area. That's why I said scrub first. It's also the easiest and cheapest thing to do. What appears in a photo to be gummy varnish might just be build up of polish and gunk. If the varnish is still hard, don't bother stripping it. As others have mentioned the cabinets look good and solid, and worth preserving.

    If the varnish is sticky and nasty, it's worth stripping and redoing. And it might be worth hiring someone to at least apply the new. That's where some local advice from someone who can identify the wood and the finish, and the best way to treat it, would be invaluable.

    If you want to update the look while you're revarnishing (if you have to), you can get a little more depth of color in the finish. The flat brown is very period.

    With the raised panels, if you wanted to, you could rub a little gilding into the crannies the way it has recently been popular to antique things with dark wax. That would be oh, so authentic, and a touch of whimsey.

    The plain brown finish, left plain brown, seems to me to call for more of a period treatment. Like this kind of wall paper in the breakfast room. But that would make the room look smaller. You could do an homage, rather than the real thing, by painting a few motifs on the walls with a lot more background, rather than real, authentic paper.

    {{gwi:1605666}}

    The color chip was just a random fresh green from MyPerfectColor.com. I think it's the one labelled a color match they did of Behr Water Spout.

    The Marmoleum I posted has really authentic to period tones in it, and I thought I'd show it because it's challenging. It may be way too authentic a palette for your taste, but all these yellows and yellow greens and yellow oranges are just right with your cabinets and will pick up the flat brown. They're not the gild everything Hollywood Regency kinds of colors, though.

    Hollywood Regency is more bone, antiqued cream, gold, French blue, apricot, gold, avocado even, but lots of cream and gold. While I definitely think that that's the source of the shape of your panels, in true Hollywood Regency they'd be antiqued cream with marbled inset panels in a gold veined sickly yellowish avocado color. Possibly with gilding on the ogee. That's why I think Palimsest hit it as a country version of HR. Steff said it with the gold (flocked or not) wall paper if you wanted real HR, but I think with those cabinets the yellow/green/orange is both prettier and more on target.

    You don't have to do any of this! It's great knowing where it came from so that when you change it you'll have an idea of what your changes mean in context.

    I'd be careful of going too dark with any of the finishes, however, as they'll make the room look smaller, whereas now it looks potentially airy without that ghastly yellow on the walls. But if you want real drama you can do the cabinets with black lacquer paint and a red and black checkerboard floor and also have a look that works with the detailing on the doors. ;-)

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Okay, I admit, I feel a bit stupid. When Hollywood Regency was mentioned, I thought back to when I had seen Hollywood Regency while looking for furniture on Craigslist, well, being I live near Hollywood, I thought the furniture listed was from a hotel named the Hollywood Regency. And when St Charles was mentioned, I thought maybe that was an area, had no idea it was a style! Now I know just how wrong I was.

    Pllog, I'm going to take a guess that the cabinets probably aren't a sticky mess, it's just the way the house has been kept that I think this, but won't know for sure til I get there. I don't know if previous owners were smokers but the house doesn't have any indication having smokers in there and I've been in homes that I couldn't even step in, so I know I would notice that smell if it were there. The current owners are an elderly couple and have lived in the house just under 6yrs, prior to them was the original owner. The entire house looks like it was well kept really. When the inspector came he said he was surprised for a house that age, the great condition it was in. It has a ton of potential if I can potentially find the $$$ to tap in to that potential. I like much of the HR designs. I like the idea of gilding and will more in to that too. Some great ideas and all very much appreciated!!

    I did find this picture of a HR design that has a small element of the cabinets. Wouldn't have found it without your input!!

    Here is a link that might be useful: {{gwi:1605650}}

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Interesting chest. It's sort of HR crossed with mod. Very 60's.

    It would be great if the varnish is in good condition and it's just a trick of light that it looks gummy. Sometimes gumminess just comes from age.

    Have you seen the resale shops on LaBrea? I haven't been in since I started the kitchen thing, but they used to have some great HR stuff. You can also sometimes come across great finds at places like Wertz Bros., especially if you're looking for dinette furniture.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I think I just fell in love with the cabinets if I could do this to them!!!!

    I'd love this piece in the house!!!

    Here is a link that might be useful:

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    This is a picture from my parents' house, another 40+ year old house in excellent condition. The furniture is 40+, the bedspreads are probably 50, (but bought new :) and the wallpaper etc. is the D word--you can't see the mauve carpet.

    But the furniture is a pleasant French Provincial-ish, Hollywood Regency-ish grey and blue wash. The beds have that clipped corner but I dont have a good picture of that.

    If you wanted to preserve the original finish thats great, but I agree, an antiqued finish like your piece and these pieces could be quite nice.
    {{gwi:1605668}}

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Great photo palimpsest. It's still a beautiful room.

    Debelli - Love that antiqued finish. I antiqued a bathroom vanity with similar style doors. They weren't nearly as nice as yours because the detail was routed into a slab of laminate. It was enough of an improvement to live with for a few years until we sold the house.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    It's the exact color, style and wood grain that have me convinced they're birch. (Though the grain that's most similar is on the end panels -- perhaps the end panels are birch and the doors are maple?) They're exactly like my parents' cabinets, except for the applied molding. Same hinges, same handles, same styling otherwise. Birch was a very popular wood at that time and acquires that golden tone after years of exposure to light.

    Now if you take off the panels/molding, you'll find a very different color underneath -- I wouldn't do it. Not to mention, probably destroying the door in the process...

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    i totally agree with hmdennis! and believe me, you are so lucky to be moving into a house with wood cabs.

    i would paint them white. bring in some fun color (aqua won pantone's color of the year award!) and buy some fun knobs from anthropologie.

    it's soooo cute! have fun in the new house. be bold! everyone will compliment you.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Oh, yeah, Debelli, that's it.

    The ne plus ultra is the knobs that are the same shape as the panel. Gilt, of course. They have a little mound base and are a wire (i.e., open) of the clipped corner shape, sticking out perpendicular to the cabinet face.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I had that pattern cabinet in my first house that was built in the 40s. They were avocado green by the time I moved in. I painted them white. Don't know what color they started. I loved them. It was a saltbox cottagey bungalowish county house in a small town.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Palimpset, I love the bedroom. I remember my Mom having covers like those on the beds in her and my Dads room. Such a pretty room, and I do love the furniture! Before I take the plunge and do anything with the cabinets, trust me, I'm going to weigh the options. BUT you have to admit, that piece is gorgeous and I can see those cabinets just looking mahvelous with that finish. What to put with them is a whole other ball of wax!

    Steff, if you happen to come by any of those pics of the old bathroom, please post. Let me know if you have any ideas using that type of finish on that piece of furniture with those cabinets.

    Sweeby, I guess the only way to find out the true nature of the wood is to get a carpenter in that knows his wood. I guess it's hard to tell from pictures. Me, I couldn't tell you either way, not my forte so to speak. One thing for sure, I'll be bringing home one of the doors so I don't have to rely on pictures as I'm trying to plan my next move in that kitchen.

    sabjimata, thanks for the help. Not sure if I can play up the color, I'm getting more subdued in my older age. Years ago, color was definitely on my mind, but my tastes have changed along with my age. What I would have chosen years ago is not something I find myself going for now. It's hard enough for me to paint my walls anything other than white tones, anything other than that is a major step for me, whatever other color it may be. Maybe I'll do something more fun in one of the bathrooms?

    Plllog, glad you think the same about it as I do. I instantly fell in love. Now, as I mentioned above, I will need to think of what may be able to go with that, and then, who can get that look on those cabinets for me! What's the ne plus ultra, did I miss something there? Can you post a link to these knobs, though I think I may have an idea what you are talking about.

    So, any ideas of what to put with the cabinets should I go this route as shown in the link below, same as the one in the post above.

    THANKS ALL!!!

    Here is a link that might be useful:

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I can't find a picture of those pulls, but they were really really common! Ne plus ultra means literally "no more beyond". Sometimes means "pinnacle", in this context more like "be all end all" or "ultimate". Those knobs are the ultimate in that style.

    I think the antique white and gilt finish would be great. Very period appropriate and just a tad tongue in cheek, a little of wink and nod to the era.

    You could get a matching table (antiqued white) or, since it's a breakfast room, go period all the way and get white sparkly formica with copper edge band and legs. Chairs with metal frames and separate backs. Or, if you have room, swivel buckets with vinyl seats. Look at this one.

    That would definitely call for wall paper. White walls wouldn't be inappropriate to the room, but just like you don't want to put all white food on a plate, an all white eating area isn't often appetizing.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago
  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    The following site is for people who own homes built in the 40's,50's,60's and 70's and want to renovate without distroying their homes character or breaking the bank. There are lots of pics, ideas and product sources that might help in your project.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Retro renovation for Mid-century homes

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Plllog, I would like that set. I saw something I liked on another site that would probably look great in there too.

    Palimpset, that chair is a bit too stately for me. I think I'd have to do a queen wave sitting in that!!!

    Skyedog, I've been all over that site, but it's a great link to post for others. THANKS!

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    No pictures of the vanity. That was before digital cameras.

    My parent's house had similar vanities with gold glitter veins in the cultured "marble" tops, filigree knobs with white and gold highlights, off white wallpaper with a small gold diamond pattern, but the lights were very 60's modern or retro now. So they did mix the modern pieces in with it back then. It's all been updated, but I think we still have the lights and I could try to get a picture when I go over there next.

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