SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
palimpsest

Design Around #12--1960s tract house.

palimpsest
9 years ago

For this design around, a 1960s tract or subdivision house was chosen. In 1960-1970 house size slowly increased, a kitchen open to the family room rather than just a small eating area became more common, but we weren't yet commonly seeing vaulted ceilings or very large kitchens.

This represents a fairly common house:

As does this:

With a plan something like this:

***Keep In Mind: Based upon regional differences, the Exterior Appearance of these houses will Vary Greatly. Some of these floor plans were offered in Each Subdivision with as many as Five Exteriors.***

This was the beginning of the disconnect between interior and exterior, as all the interiors were "soft contemporary" (although contemporary = soft modernism in this case).

All the actual kitchens would have been along these lines until toward 1970, I believe (when the "country kitchen" took over):

So, we are designing kitchens for a relatively modest house that is between 1700-2000 square feet, has room to expand the kitchen workspace within the existing footprint, and has 8 foot ceilings throughout. In many cases the kitchen faced the front. The exterior could be Modern, Colonial Revival, French, Mock Tudor, "Traditional", Spanish Revival or Ranch.

So, the exterior of the house can be selected for your design cues. I think the narratives are fun, but I think it would be informative to explain why you made the decisions you did as the Designer instead of just "Jack likes this and Jill likes that". People liking something is how some interiors end up a mess. I'd personally rather see an informed decision making process.

Refer to the link for further discussion and information on the development of the tract house.

Here is a link that might be useful: Other Tract House Examples.

Comments (92)

  • cawaps
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Annkathryn's post reminds me of something I wanted to mention. While these houses are often quite modest, that's not the same as cheap. Due to the "location, location, location" mantra, some of these homes can be really expensive (annkathryn's, in the Silicon Valley. was priced at $888,888).

    Just something to think about in terms of budgets.

  • mtnfever (9b AZ/HZ 11)
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Here's the gist for those wanting to skip the story: Phoenix tract house with kitchen redone for coolness and cheapness.

    While Dorothy and Tom were enjoying their retirement mountain house with the animal print Saltillo floor tile, they were getting restless when it was below zero but not enough snow to ski either. Soon they were reminiscing about their college days in Phoenix and Tom thought maybe buying a tiny old house could be done even on their fixed income, given the horrendous nature of the housing market there. By the time all was said and done, it ws August and they were now the proud owners of one of the original 1960s Phase 1 houses in the Sun City AZ "retirement community".

    They knew they wanted to update some of the rooms, particularly the kitchen, but the budget they spent on their mountain house was a far cry from what they could spend here. As they left their mountain in August on a cool 70 degree morning, they started discussing what to do and how to do it on the cheap. When they arrived at their low desert destination, they staggered through the 120 degree heat into the house, flopped onto the folding chairs they'd brought, and decided one thing: this house was going to look and feel cool; the antithesis of their mountain home.

    They did almost all of the work themselves and hired Starving Students a few days to help with the heavy lifting. The cabs, pulls, shelves, and backsplash (several glass noticeboards) came from Ikea. The sink-side backsplash windows were definitely hired out but helped bring much needed light into the room and the sink was a splurge too. The full-depth apron sink and freestanding range meant they didn't need counter cutouts, just squares. The prefab granite they had cut to their measurements and the Students help with the install. The granite felt great when coming in from the heat outside.

    Dorothy was glad they found an induction range at a scratch and dent sale since induction would help keep the heat down while cooking. She liked how the wall color showed through the backsplash--easy to change if she ever wanted to (sorry I couldn't make the "glass" transparent!).

    The dining table was the last splurge and even came with the green apples (just seeing if you're still awake...).

    *cabs Ikea Ramsjo $88 but they're not very wide. I thought I had seen wider Ikea drawers but I couldn't find them
    *prefab granite $3sqft plus $10 per cut ~3 cuts
    *Kohler sink and faucet $2k
    *vinyl plank laminate floor $3sqft
    *induction range $1800
    *hood Ouch I'm sure this was spendy too
    *lights $48 each
    *chandalier $221
    *table $1700?? can't remember it or chairs
    *shelves Ikea Ekby Gruven $40
    *pulls Ikea Tag $5/2pack (rounded to not catch on clothes or people)
    *backsplash Ikea Kludd noticeboard $20 each
    *and fridge DW etc

    I thought I had done pretty well on keeping costs low but now looking at the list, I think not so much. Well, good thing this is all make believe and I have lots of time to plan for the real deal!

    as usual the DAT thread is great!

    cheers

  • Related Discussions

    About the Design Around This threads

    Q

    Comments (28)
    I wanted to thank all who were involved in the DAT threads and especially Marcolo. I am planning on building a home from a kit home plan in a few years. One I love is a 1924 William Radford bungalow, but we will probably end up with a story and a half bungalow to get a few more bedrooms. I have been researching these old plans like crazy, and they are amazing. I have found a couple with a more 'modern' layout. When I say modern the kitchen only has two doorways (from DR and outside) instead of the four or five I sometimes see here. Marcolo said something in the Victorian DAT thread and again to Lavender_Lass which is where I originally saw it and then linked back. I was trying to figure out how 'authentic' I should go with the house. That comment was (I am paraphrasing) "I like the idea of seeing a vintage kitchen developing over time. It should represent every decade that it has passed." It made complete sense to me, and it is exactly what I want. I love history (I have an MLS and was waiting for a permenant position at the National Archives when the crappy economy hit, and I decided to be a SAHM). Marcolo had also said (and I do believe this was from the DAT threads as well) "Do not just assume the trends and materials used at the time. Actually do the research for yourself." I know it seems obvious now, and especially since I'm still a professional researcher. It took reading that however to think about our next home in a completely different way. I am now creating a back story for our yet to be built home to create a sense of history and to help determine the finishes. Every detail will be planned before we build because everything will be a piece of a puzzle. I hope to share the back story as well as the home when we are able to build. I do hope more people read the DAT threads because they are awesome. I learned a lot and have saved all of them for reference. I came late to GW to participate in those the first time around, but the collective knowledge and creativity in those threads are amazing. Thank you again everyone for putting in some extra time for those exercises. I have learned a great deal.
    ...See More

    Design Around This #17: Steampunk. Post Designs Here

    Q

    Comments (83)
    If we do fashion, (or art) I would be willing to set it up because I think it's been a while. I have some thoughts about how I would like to do it. I don't think it necessarily has to be current fashion, although current fashion is so diverse, that covers an awful lot of bases. What I suggest is to use fashion as an inspiration or a particular garment as inspiration and this can drive the color scheme or the style of kitchen, and it could be done as a relatively subjective interpretation, or as objectively as you want: Meaning a Menswear kitchen could have a tan floor, navy cabinets, brass hardware, a striped backsplash and leather seating--as a classic "blue blazer" kitchen. A bridal dress could inspire an all Ivory kitchen. I would *not* want the kitchen to take a singular fabric from the fashion world and simply use it as a textile in the kitchen. The Idea is to reinterpret the fashion in the materials used for kitchens. I don't think a historical fashion needs to inspire a historical kitchen. This Ikat dress from the 18th c. could inspire a contemporary kitchen, for example.
    ...See More

    Design Around #19 Post Designs for A-a-h-vocado & Gold

    Q

    Comments (85)
    With the real estate listing idea, is it everyone re-doing the same kitchen, or everyone picks a different listing and works from that? I thought it was the former when it was originally proposed, but either would work. I actually have a sports fan kitchen ready and waiting--I did it for the tract home thread (not thinking sports fan, but it is incidently in my college colors), and it didn't quite work (mostly because I was thinking the home would have an open or quasi-open floor plan, and I couldn't figure out how the kitchen colors would fit into the larger space). But since we just did a color-themed DAT, I think we should do something different for this one. Marcolo, I think that there is some truth to the in crowd/out crowd idea. Some of it is driven by indivduals who want to be cutting edge. Some is driven by the industry, since remodeling is significantly driven by things being identified as dated (if nothing was ever dated, we'd all keep our stuff until it wore out, and where's the profit in that?). In clothing fashion, I have seen so many trends come and go, and be completely reviled, only to come back again with a different name 15 or 20 years later(bell bottoms, flares, boot cut; hip huggers & low rise). I have photos of me from high school in outfits that would have been the height of fashion two years ago. I've seen this happen so many times that I no longer take clothing fashion at all seriously, and laugh at those who do (waiting for my daughter to hit her tweens). Design cycles in kitchens are much longer, and so things stay out of fashion much longer.
    ...See More

    Architect custom -> Builder Custom -> Semi Custom -> Tract

    Q

    Comments (58)
    The question is...does it matter? I think it does, because words matter. We throw around words on this board constantly when we really mean other things, and I too am guilty of this. Custom really doesn't mean custom when used on this board, it means architect. So someone who maybe isn't experienced on this board may see the word "custom" and think they designed their house from the ground up, therefore it is very custom. When most posters really mean the house needs someone with professional design experience and some measure of talent to guide you through the design process or actually design the home. ----------- Also a better understanding of the differentiation can lead to better advice. In the area I was born in (an area that I still own land in), the major tract builder can build a 4,000 square foot house for under $280,000. If you can't differentiate between a tract and production builder, it is hard to understand how that is possible. ----------- Finally, I am not sure this board does a great job these days of helping people build a home. I might be alone in this, but I would prefer a well built, poorly designed home over a poorly built, well designed home. We focus so much on the design process and the freedom you have to make selections that we sometimes miss the real tragedy of production and tract builders, the shortcuts they take in construction in order to deliver those appealing prices. While I agree custom homes are better than semi-custom and semi-custom is better than production, etc., the real quality cutoff for me is control of the how the walls are built rather than where they are built. For me this is the biggest draw for an architect and the thing rarely touched on, but may actually pay dividends far into the future that make architects not only affordable, but profitable for those value conscious consumers. Again, this is just my opinion.
    ...See More
  • beaglesdoitbetter1
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Ok. Here's my first attempt at a DAT. I'm not sure if it is right and I don't think it's a kitchen I'd like to live in, but here goes...

    The house was built in 1960:

    The couple moves in and needs to gut the kitchen but decides they want to stay true to the style of the times. They get ahold of a Better Homes and Gardens Decorating Book from 1960 and find these inspiration pics:

    And they decide to try to modernize some elements but do a take-off on those ideas. This is what they come up with:

    Copper sink and range hood
    Pegboard backsplash
    Acid washed concrete floor
    Glass countertops
    Green glass jar pendants

  • steph2000
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    How fun that you went with a backsplash window and IKEA cabinets in one of these houses, mtnfever, given we just put in that BS window and are considering IKEA! In fact, we went down to Seattle for an "IKEAN Christmas" to check it out. 4 times to IKEA in 3 days was a trip - and managed to wear my partner out like plane rides, casinos and late nights in the city are apparently incapable of doing! I'm sort of continually wondering what to do with the other wall of BS, so it's gratifying to see what someone else might do.

    On the other side of the cost continum, I'm always intrigued by Marcolo's Crowne Point cabinets, but I can't work with that little arch along the bottom of the uppers. It is just too similar to what we have now - and doesn't play nice with the BS window. I like the little feet on the lowers.

    There's a lot to like about all the kitchens here.

  • mudhouse_gw
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Steph2000, I don't think you should worry about your comments derailing the thread at all. I find it helpful to hear from folks who own houses of this period, as I try to get a better handle on the topic.

    There are no 60's tract homes in my city (which isn't huge) but I did find one small area of 50's tract homes. I think some southwestern 60's tract homes may look very different from the 60's tract homes shown as examples here. That may have been throwing me a bit; I found info today on a wide range of 60's tract homes in Phoenix, constructed largely from concrete block, and that seemed more familiar to me. It has taken me a while to "get" this thread.

    Marcolo, the Crown Point Traditional cabinets in your board seem to fit perfectly. That would be a very happy and pretty kitchen to work in, and it would be a lot of fun to accessorize with colorful dishes.

    Sochi, yours also is very cheerful. I don't think your boards all look the same. They do all have a sense of fun color, drama and energy that I admire a lot.

    Pal, your lavender kitchen uses one of my favorite colors (where is Lavender Lass?) I'm not sure why people don't use this color more often. I painted a closet dresser this color, and half of my family fainted in shock. I think it would be a pleasing surprise to go through the door of the modest blue house and find this level of simple elegance (I think that house needs your help on the outside too.)

    Your Levittown Country Clubber seemed so appropriate to the house, I felt guilty about not trying harder to mesh my own board with the period. Once again you're able to assemble the feeling of a period while using modern materials (reminds me of your retro pink kitchen, accomplished by using all currently available materials.) I think I'd like the coppery metallic tones inside.

    The remodeled Levittown houses with the gables and palladian windows seem sort of cartoony to me, I keep thinking the house fronts look startled (maybe it's the raised eyebrow effect.)

    Melissastar, me too, I stay up way too late since these threads started. I like your sage green and red combo, I could totally live there. It does look very right for a young family, to me.

    Mtnfever, your Spanish revival and southwest style is strong where I live, so these colors and materials are familiar. I think your materials acknowledge the style well, without clubbing people over the head with it. (I get kinda tired of seeing really obvious Spanish choices here.) It feels bright and modern and fitting to the house.

    I can also relate to your thinking about the desert heat when designing the Sun City home. (My grandparents lived in Sun City briefly, left because they said there were too many old people.) I find myself wanting cool, light colored materials in our home too. Also can't help realizing that the smooth modern materials you chose would be practical for dealing with the tons of desert dust that are part of my reality, although that may not have been your intent!

    Youngdeb, I really hope you'll post pics of your upcoming project for your 1952 ranch, when you tackle it. I think the stainless countertop coupled with wood doors and painted cabinet frames would be very striking, I'd love to see this board in real life. My mother has wonderful bedroom furniture from the sixties, painted white dresser drawer fronts against dark stained wood cases, and it's very distinctive.

    Beaglesdoitbetter, so glad to see you do a board here! I like the strong modern tone the glass countertop brings, in contrast to the retro feel of the turquoise cabinets. As a fan of simple honest stuff I also like the pegboard wall. Lots of blues there, and I know they would have to be managed carefully in real life. But then again I know you would fine tune them perfectly (I've seen the photos of your real life kitchen with your fearless love of wonderful blue.)

    As always I feel like I'm learning, so thanks to all for participating.

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I like all of these.

    If someone is sitting back and thinking that these are looking kind of plain, I'd like to address that. I've noticed that if you take the fabrics (and some accessories as shown) out of Marcolo's, Sochi's, Melissastar's, and Mudhouse's you end up with rather limited palettes which are similar to Mtnfever's second one and mine. Melissastar does include red, but change the fixture and fridge and that color could be anything.-- And I think this can be a good thing. Youngdeb is the only one who tried a full, multicolor, cemented in place element--and that works too, but it is a different, and in some ways, more committed (albeit to many colors) approach.

    Mtnfever's first, and Beagle's are the two that stand out to me as committing to fuller more saturated color across the palette, even though still a limited palette. I think a limited palette that is interesting is harder to pull off than a wider palette. I think the boards are getting better because people are moving away from creating boards that were visually arresting because of everything that was happening and moving Toward making kitchens that would work better in real life. And, maybe, moving away from all-transitional-all-the-time to something more committed to a cohesive design style.

    Beagle, I am particularly interested in yours (as I am your own really Baroque or high Rococo kitchen). You took a distinctive 60s palette and reworked it in a very modern way. I am not sure I could live with it, completely, but that's way beside the point. I think it's a good, strong concept.

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    What if you want the "One True Kitchen" or the "Something's Got to Give" kitchen, and the essence of your house is still slab doors and ranch or clamshell moldings, and that is something that will not be changed?

    Do you go for it and have a kitchen that is a stand-alone design element? Do you abandon that idea and start looking at Pam's RetroRenovation website and seeing if you can embrace mid-century?

    I tried to put together a kitchen that riffs on the OTK, SGTG design that could both give you a version of that modern classic and do your house a favor by fitting in.









    Daltile Pepper White (the black speckles)
    Cambria Sharpham quartz (reminds me of the 60s cultured marble)
    St Charles Cabinets and Viking range (same company so can color-match)
    Wood floors (not a mid-century thing in kitchens but a nod to 2012)
    FB Parma Gray Wallcolor
    The MCM version of the lantern or bell-jar fixture
    Paul Mccobb table and chairs
    An Italian still life (Natura Morta) and commode, just because I liked them.
    The fixture and the commode in particular nod to the Hollywood Regency style of the period.

  • gsciencechick
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    These are great! As someone who lives in a 60's tract home, I had to join in this one and show you what we've actually done. There are 1,400 homes built from late 50's to late 60's, varied styles from small single-floor plan ranch like ours, larger single-floor plan ranches, small ranches with walk-out basements, tons of split-levels (three levels: basement/FR, living/kitchen, then BR's), some two-story colonials, and a few that have more MCM influence.

    As my "neighbor" Northcarolina said, overall it's a moderate neighborhood (lol, definitely not Long Island property values), so the materials generally reflect that. Yes, we have a Big Chill fridge, but we joke we are probably the most modest home they've ever delivered. Mtnfever, we even have a Samsung induction range floor model from the scratch-n-dent area. It was too great of a deal to pass up. Because we are one of the homes with no basement, we have to deal with laundry in the kitchen until we can maybe someday renovate and take care of that. The granite folks built up a cabinet around the washer to put extra counterspace. No plans to move. Total square footage is just under 1,200. The blue floor was existing by PO's. Who puts white grout in a kitchen? Oh well, Stanley Steemer does an excellent job to clean and seal it.

    Despite the trees, we get excellent natural light in the kitchen and LR especially.

    Details:
    Cabinets: existing, previously painted, now BM Chantilly Lace
    Paneling: previously painted, now BM White Heron
    Hardware: Ikea Gravyr
    Counters: Blue Pearl Granite
    Backsplash: American Olean Ocean Blues (Lowe's)
    DW: LG 6920ST
    Range: Samsung Induction, floor model
    Fridge: Big Chill in Beach Blue, were able to use EnergyStar rebate for appliances
    Lighting: Lowe's
    Pot rack: Enclume crown from Williams-Sonoma
    Faucet: Delta Saxony
    Dining: vintage Heywood-Wakefield from eBay
    Kitchenaid Artisan mixer in Ice (2011 Christmas gift)

    Exterior, on a rare Christmas Day snow from 2010:

    Fabric to recover chairs

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I've seen some of these pictures before, but thanks for sharing your real-life version of an updated kitchen that fits in a mid-century house.

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    My parents' house is not exactly a tract house, but it was modified and built from a common plan from the mid-60s. The inside is much more finished and detailed than typical but the footprint is the same.

    The kitchen had the same white cabinets as now, with black hardware, pale green "Irish Linen"Formica, a white brick Amtico floor, and white wallpaper with black outlines of flowers. The 1969 original would be much more current today than its 1987 updates are.

    So, I decided to see if I could do an updated version with current materials and take it back to its roots, without replicating it with vintage pieces.







    Back with details later, someone is here to look at the apartment.

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Laminate: "Tropical Getaway" from Pionite or Nevamar to replace Irish Linen (which they should still make)
    Quartz: Cambria Windermere
    Plain and Fancy cabinets.
    Bertazzoni Range: the originals are a Chambers SS cooktop and White GE wall ovens (still there) that are heavy on the chrome accents
    Amtico "Sedimentary Stone" vinyl, laid parquet, like the original "brick"
    Wallpaper from Interwall: very similar to the large-scale original
    Visual comfort "Eugene" replacing the original tole-shaded fixture, which was black picked out in white.
    Room and Board Soren chair and Prouve Gueridon table replacing the original tavern table and captain's chairs
    There was a oil still life of vegetables like this
    Modern black pull to replace the original Amerock "Iron" pull
    Amerock basics black knob because sometimes you can't improve on the original.

  • melissastar
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I've been working on this one off and on for a few days and I'm not satisfied...not even sure if it works at all. So I thought I'd throw it out there and see if others with a better eye than eye can figure out what it needs, or what works about it and what doesn't.

    I started on it because I really loved the alehouse vertrazzo countertop and when I showed it to my son, he thought having a countertop made of recycled beer bottles was too cool for words.

    So my theoretical owner is a single young man, in his late 20s. Works in Silicon Valley (or Idaho or Seattle area) or anyplace else where at 28 or so, he earns a good enough living in technology to buy a home and remodel it. He's old enough and mature enough to no longer want to live frat-house-style, knows a home is a good long-term investment, and wants a place that he wouldn't be ashamed to show a girlfriend. But he's still young enough to be in the fruit-and-nut-gathering stage of life and prefers beer, pizza and sports to fine dining and the theater.

    His modest ranch probably looks something like this:


    Sorry, can't figure out how to get rid of this big white space.

    His kitchen has cherry cabinets, no uppers...just two heavy shelves where what he uses frequently and looks decent resides. He eats most meals sitting at a countertop and the dining area, which is open to the kitchen, houses a table and chairs more suited to poker than dining.

    Counter and backsplash are both Vertrazzo alehouse. Sink is silgranit, biscuit colored, with a Blanco faucet. Appliances would be GE, biscuit colored, to keep the room from getting too dark. The lighting pendant is from Barn Light Electric, the large Bond. Industrial-style stool is from Crate and Barrel. Floor is green rusty slate. Dining area is where I really couldn't get it to come together. Couldn't decide if the floor should be oak or continue the slate. Am not happy with the table or chairs, but gave up finding better. I do like the wine bottle chandelier.

    I was aiming for a contemporary look, with a rustic/industrial spin that I thought would appeal to a young man, and a color palette that was sufficiently masculine, without going all black leathery or lumberjack.

    And I could not find anything resembling the kind of rug I was looking for...rust/greens with a touch of purple like in the Leroy Neiman print, called the Hustler.



  • cawaps
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I wanted to do a low budget kitchen using some of the currently unpopular but then state-of-the-art material. I was also inspired by my mom's kitchen of my childhood, which was predominantly yellow and white, with yellow cabs, a white patterned Formica counter, and a whitish linoleum floor with speckles of other colors.

    Because I didn't know of any source of stock yellow cabinets and I was trying to keep the budget down, I went with white cabinets from Ikea. The floor is a speckled predominantly white Marmoleum. Of course, my mom didn't have a full backsplash, just 4 inches of counter material and painted walls. This is where I picked up the yellow, with laminate. The counter is one of Wilsonart's special order laminates, with coffee beans. I picked up the coffee theme with the wall art, and the counter color in the dining table and chairs, both from Ikea.

    My mother had coppertone appliances, which pretty much can't be had today (although I did find a range on EBay). The closest modern appliances were out of my hypothetical budget, so I went with low-cost white ones.

    In terms of a home, I was thinking of a ranch.

    Bjursta Dining Table in brown-black (Ikea)
    Henrikdal Dining Chair in brown-black (Ikea)
    Applad cabinets, white (Ikea)
    Frigidaire refrigerator (AJ Madison)
    GE range (AJ Madison)
    Air King range hood (Sears)
    Counter is Coffee Beans laminate from Wilsonart (special order)
    Backsplash is Wilsonart laminate "Sweet Corn"
    Floor is Marmoleum Scrabble
    Pastel Augusta Counter Stool (Lamps Plus)
    Hardware is Amerock Revitalize Collection
    Poster is by Kate Ward Thacker from AllPosters.Com

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    The Martha Stewart cabinets at Home Depot come in a Heavy Cream, which looks pale yellow to me. There is also a color called Fortune Cookie which looks Peach on my monitor so I could be way off.

  • marcolo
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    pal, I like pretty much all of your designs in this thread, but the Italian pieces violates the OTK rules. Too much color and character. I think a real OTK devotee wants the virginal white princess bridal dress experience.

  • cawaps
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Marcolo Crown Point Transitional--This is a very fun, pleasant kitchen. I love the wall color.

    Sochi green/orange--I love the fabric. It reminds me a lot of my mom's decorating choices from when I was a kid, which means it's pretty much spot on for the era.

    Palimpsest lavender--I found this one to be very relaxing. I especially like the chairs and lighting fixture.

    Melissastar butterfly--I love the muted greens with the bright reds. I love Vetrazzo and the Hollywood sage works beautifully here.

    Mtnfever Spanish revival--I think the palette works very well together. I think that you did a good job of getting the right amount of Spanish revival feel without being too much for the house.

    Palimpsest correlated neutrals--You did a great job of mixing neutrals here, and the design really evoked the 60s for me (especially the drapes and the backsplash, that somehow reminded me of a leisure suit). My problem with this one is that you did such a good a job evoking a genuine 60s feel that it brought brought up some of my personal baggage about 60s design.

    Youngdeb--I love those wishbone chairs, too. I like the color combinations. I like the orange mixed into the green backsplash, but it sounded from you description like you were going for a straight green?


    Mtnfever Sun City--Barring one or two items, you did a nice job of sticking to a budget. I think this kitchen would be very appealing to a lot of people right now. The flip side of that is that I didn't see you taking any risks with this design.

    Beaglesdoitbetter--Congrats on your first DAT moodboard. You did a great job of putting together something that echoed you inspiration pics. I love the mix of materials--glass, copper, concrete.

    Palimpsest OTK--White appliances? In the OTK? Gasp! It's funny, the first time I looked at this one, I didn't see the OTK at all, and I think the white range is one of the reasons. The commode is the other--way too flashy for the OTK. I like it, but as some people have commented about the OTK, I find it a bit cold.

    Gsciencechick--I like the vibe of your kitchen with the Big Chill fridge. Your cabs remind me of my mom's.

    Palimpsest Irish Linen--I love the greens and the large scale wallpaper. It's a happy kitchen.

    Melissastar beer kitchen--I've already said I love Vetrazzo, and you did a great job of bringing out the alehouse in the Alehouse Amber. I like the kitchen and don't have any great recommendations for the dining area. The chair makes me think of something you'd find in an upscale bar. Suits your guy, but not really practical for a dining chair, I think.

  • adel97
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I've started perusing GW again after not logging in for a few months, and I just wanted to say that I find all the DAT threads extremely interesting. I feel like I am getting a design class in every one! I especially like the examples of how to do combined neutrals well, and the discussion of design era when choosing materials. Anyway, one of these days I might get the nerve to do a board for a DAT, but in the meantime, I just wanted to thank all the contributors for the education and the eye candy!

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I put in the Swedish chest because I thought it was cold without, so I understand. But that shows the power of one piece. The kitchen without it is pretty OTK--the reason I used a white range is because of the potential for exact color matching since they are both Viking companies.

    Its funny because the Irish Linen kitchen is Very White. And the original Irish Linen laminate is at the light end of the countertop color. About the saturation of the floor tile, but green instead of gray. It's not cold as some near white kitchens because of the wallpaper. And some people look at all white as "crisp" rather than "cold".

  • gsciencechick
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Cawaps, BTW, I did order that swatch of fabric from your DAT Animal prints creation, but DH feels it's too much floral. I'm happy with the fabric I found, though. Just need to find the time to do it.

  • mudhouse_gw
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Pal, I really like the board styled after your parent's kitchen. I started out with the Pionite "Tropical Getaway" in a board I"m still working on. I think it would be beautiful with the Cambria Windermere. I also really like the updated chairs and table, with the large scale wallpaper. I like it all.

    I thought the exercise you did for the OTK or SGTG kitchen worked, but that style is just too formal for me personally, no matter how hard I try. I can admire it but it makes me feel uncomfortable, if I try to imagine living in one. I do like the painting and the Swedish chest, even though they are also formal; they are visually interesting.

    Melissastar, I thought your second board worked really well. Loved the slate floor with the cabinets and Vertrazzo alehouse counters, and I think you achieved your goal of arriving at a kitchen that would be very appealing to young men (and to me too!) I agree a less "barrel-y" chair might work better as a dining chair, but I'd keep the table myself (the heavy steel base is right up my alley.) I also think it works great with your hardware, stool, and faucet choices.

    Cawaps I liked the coffee theme and your choices of materials. I think it works (unground beans on the counter, and ground beans on the floor!) I'm also noticing how much I like the kitchens in this thread that seem to have a sense of informal fun, like yours, Marcolo's, Melissastar's, Sochi's, and Gsciencechick's real kitchen. I am visualizing all of these kitchens as small spaces, so is that why fun, less formal themes seem so appropriate? Not sure.

    Now I wish I hadn't made the owner of my soft green kitchen above such a stuffy old fussbudget.

    Gsciencechick, thanks so much for posting your pics. Looks to me like a space that works well and would be really pleasing to live in. I keep noticing too how the inclusion of the Big Chill appliances seems to make the space...happy, with a sense of humor. I have some of the same materials in my own 60's house (painted cabinets, painted paneling) but the exterior of houses like yours is very different from what I see in my part of the country, so it's great to see the real deal and be able to peek inside. We haven't done a thing to ours yet, so it's encouraging to see what others have done. I bet the Blue Pearl granite is really beautiful with the light on it.

    Sharonite, I feel the same way, each of these threads teaches me things I knew nothing about before. I hope you'll jump in one of these days, it's a lot of fun. All you need is a starting point, and you'll see how addicting it is.

  • marcolo
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    This thread could use a couple of posts in a "This, not That" format to show how you can execute the OTK, or any style, really, in a way that fits the house better and will date more slowly.

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Re: the Swedish Chest, I like to do this type of thing in real life if I can sell the idea. This client went for it. The rest of the furnishings are very simple modern pieces and the apartment is an envelope of off-white walls, floor to ceiling wall to wall off-white drapes and a near off-white floor. He does have some elaborate art and artifacts, though.

  • formerlyflorantha
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Mudhouse, I compliment you again. I like your choices.

  • lavender_lass
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Not trying to rush anyone, but just curious as to what's up for the next thread. I'm going to try to figure out this 'mood board' but it may take a while! LOL I thought it might be better to just start on the next project :)

  • mudhouse_gw
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Thank you florantha.

    Pal, thanks, now I better understand how you might use the items like the chest as focal points (in this thread and in previous ones as well.) I like the idea of keeping an easy-to-live-with palette that allows a few very special pieces to really shine.

    I have one more I'll post shortly, just finishing up.

  • cawaps
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I'm also thinking about the next DAT (I have another mood board for this one, but haven't posted because I am ambivalent about it; I'll probably post it anyway).

    I've been thinking about Lavender's French country, and also about the modern rustic proposal (it has come up in a couple of recent threads about people's real kitchens). There are others I want to do, but I don't see anyone on the board trying to figure out how to do Steampunk or Hollywood Regency in their own kitchens, so there's no rush to get to those.

  • mudhouse_gw
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I ended up working with a different kind of 60's tract home for this board. I know part of the challenge for this thread was the open-endedness of the design, and hopefully (?) these modern style tract homes aren't too design-specific to fit here. When I think of tract homes here in the southwest, I tend to think of squatty, one story stucco or concrete block structures, with flat or very low pitch rooflines. Kind of ugly, some of them, but the plain shapes do make a nice backdrop for the geometric shapes of the desert plants I like.

    Paradise Gardens is a Phoenix subdivision, associated with the designer Al Beadle. The original tract was subdivided in 1958, and the first recorded sale was in 1960. The flat-roofed block construction homes were available in four basic plans: the Ocotillo, the Cholla, the Palo Verde, and the Saguaro. Phoenix was home to one of the largest manufacturers of concrete block in the country, and many of these homes feature exterior accent walls of decorative concrete block (which I really like.) Currently these homes are popular with rehabbers and designers. The original prices ranged around $17,000-$19,000. They seem to sell in the $350,000 to $500,000 range now (usually heavily remodeled.)

    The home I used is a Saguaro model, and these photos are from 1961 (note the cool red car in the carport.) I circled the little U-shaped kitchen in red. The refrigerator is located on a wall directly across from the sink/window wall.

    I thought the original kitchen shown in the photo above looked like a small brown cave. I wanted to keep it mostly intact, but make it light and bright. I thought the boxy shapes of these houses suggested blocks of color.

    The lower cabinets are glossy pale blue laminate, and the uppers are aluminum framed with frosted glass. The counters began as Pionite "Tropical Getaway," but changed to the more vibrant Caesarstone Apple Martini. The speckled rubber tile floors were the only material I considered really retro. The lime green and pale blue glass accent tiles are 1" square, and the white wall tiles are 4" squares like those original to the kitchen.

    Plumbing and window locations remained the same (a dishwasher could be added to the peninsula.) I removed the upper cabinets over the peninsula, but kept the uppers elsewhere. I sacrificed the small upper cabinets over the original cooktop, to gain the visual element of a range hood with tile backsplash. I gained cabinet space elsewhere by using a range with double ovens, eliminating any wall oven.

    The vertical blocks of colored tiles are an attempt to offset the low kitchen ceiling (which I kept.) I hoped that making the blue and green color blocks asymmetrical would make it playful and interesting. A roman shade was more streamlined than drapes, and didn't obscure the window tile detail.

    In the above board, the large blue and green squares (with the bar stools) is a bad attempt to show that the Apple Martini color wraps down the side of the peninsula, to make one more block of color on the end. The outside wall of the peninsula would be covered with a blue laminate to match the lower cabinets, and the Apple Green countertop would be extended far enough to provide enough leg room for two stools.

    I added a deeper turquoise blue with accessories, the rug, and lighting. I wanted a third color to give the homeowners more to choose from as they furnished the adjacent living space. For example, a large gray carpet for flooring in the next room could provide a foundation for furnishings in turquoise/gray/white, or soft green/gray/white, or pale blue/gray/black, and so on. I thought the two-color bright lime green and pale blue scheme would be too restricting for the living area, so tried to provide an "escape route" to a wider range of complementary schemes.

    Lower cabs: Holiday kitchens, Geneva door style, Honey Do Laminates
    Upper cabs: Holiday kitchens, aluminum frame with frosted glass doors
    Caesarstone Apple Martini countertop
    Rubber speckled floor tiles by CityScape, Cool Wave
    Wall tiles, any 4" white tile
    Accent glass tiles, Susan Jablon, Pale Aqua Blue and Lime Green
    Mini Echo Pendant, ylighting.com
    Rug, Trans Ocean Seville Mosaic Stripes, rugstudio.com
    LG double oven range
    Kitchenaid Architect Series French door refrigerator, white
    Knoll Bertoia stool, allmodern.com
    Blanco undermount white Super Single sink
    Delta Saville Stainless faucet
    Roman shade, Savannah lime green from eBay superdeals955
    Hardware: Top Knobs brushed satin nickel, Asbury Collection
    Paul Klee print, Friendly Game, 1933
    Marimekko "Socks Rolled Down" dessert bowls

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    That scheme works for me.

    If the "budget" was high enough this may be one of the places to use the Walker Zanger or Ann Sacks tiles that are dimensional, or shaped (other than rectangular, there are cruciforms and such) to riff off the decorative concrete block.

  • mudhouse_gw
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Oh, I like that idea a lot, and never even considered it.

    I like the decorative concrete blocks so much I even considered doing a veneer of them on the outside of the peninsula, painted (but the idea of bleeding kneecaps made me realize it was yet another wrong design turn.) :-)

  • sochi
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I really like that too mudhouse. I personally don't care for little mosaic type tiles, but I like what you're proposing with the blue, green and white. I love the carports!

    cawaps, your colours look pretty bang on for the era as well, although I would have preferred your original idea for yellow cabs. I wonder how much it costs to get IKEA cabs painted in a shop? I like the coffee beans, neat concept.

    I've spent my spare time this last week considering lay outs for our one day reno of our master bathroom (see the bathroom forum if bathroom layout interests you. No comments on my lovely golden oak cabs please), so I didn't have time to do a second kitchen here. As for the next DAT, I'm all for rustic modern or French Country. I don't know much about French country, but I have a good source for inspiration pictures. And rustic modern is just fun.

  • harrimann
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    The tract house I'm working with is pretty typical. Lots of windows. Little ornamentation. There are hardwoods throughout the home with narrow unpainted baseboards. There is no crown moulding in the house. The original wood slab doors and copper doorknobs are still in good shape. The living room has a classic 1960s asymmetrical pinkish brick fireplace.

    Though most people would replace the slab doors, rip out the fireplace brick and slap some white crown moulding around all the rooms, the owners will leave these elements intact. They'd like a kitchen that "fits" the rest of the house, but they don't want it to look like the set of Mad Men.

    Here's the mood of the house:

    The remodelled kitchen will have frameless cabinets with oak slab doors. Counters will be silestone. The backsplash will be a warm grey 2x12 tile. The hardwood floors will continue from the rest of the house into the kitchen. The appliances will be white. (The higher-end glass front type that won't yellow.) Cabinet hardware will be copper.

  • mtnfever (9b AZ/HZ 11)
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    mcmjilly, would you please tell me where you found the copper pull like that? I love that style but have not been able to find it in the bright copper that you found. thank you!

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I like the horizontal oak, the copper, etc. I would be a bit afraid of the green wallcolor--that's not a color from my childhood that I embrace, much. But thats a matter of personal taste only.

  • lavender_lass
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Mudhouse- Love your color combination...very cheerful! :)

    Sochi- You said something about the next DAT being Rustic Modern or French Country. What if we did both, or rather, a very open interpretation of rustic. I like the pink kitchen thread the best (so far) because it allowed everyone's imagination to really run wild. The only constraint was pink.

    So, what if we did the same thing with Rustic? Any rustic kitchen, you just have to explain what type of rustic you're choosing. Rustic modern, rustic farmhouse, rustic lodge, rustic european country, etc. What do you all think? It might be fun to have a really broad topic, again :)

  • melissastar
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Mudhouse: Love the colors and the color blocks in that last kitchen. It's the first contemporary kitchen I've seen that I could embrace. Others I have admired, but am not tempted to want to live in them.

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    So, what is next, do you think?

  • gsciencechick
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    These are excellent, mudhouse and mcmjilly!

    The Big Chill fridge makes me smile every day. :) We've had guests hug it. Even contractors like the Orkin man love it.

  • sochi
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Let's do French Country and put poor Lavender out of her misery. :)

  • cawaps
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I'm okay with that. She has been very patient. I don't know anything about French Country, but I guess I'll be learning soon.

  • lavender_lass
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I appreciate you all offering to do French Country, which I love...but we could also do a rustic kitchen (as I suggested above) which could include French Country, as well as Rustic Modern, Rustic Lodge, Rustic Farmhouse, Rustic European Coutnry, etc. :)

    What do you think?

  • lavender_lass
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I'm bumping this up, to get input from Pal and Marcolo (and others) on the next DAT :)

  • sochi
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I'm okay with French Country, and am happy to see rustic interpretations of this, but I do want to keep rustic modern on its own if possible. Doesn't mean we can't do Euro Rustic Modern, etc., but I'd like to keep the modern in it if possible.

    Another suggestions that we said we would consider soon-ish is the up-cycled kitchen.

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Fine with French Country. I agree we shouldn't go too broad: we've already done Tuscan, which is another traditional rustic, and I agree that Modern Rustic gets into a whole 'nother genre.

    Who wants to set it up? You can set a parameter or two if you want....

  • lavender_lass
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Well, if you all want to do French Country, sounds good to me! LOL

  • marcolo
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    French country sounds good to me, too.

    I think we should revive some of the rules, in shorter form maybe, and link to the sorta-FAQ for the benefit of new people who join in. In fact, there probably should be a sentence or two describing what the thread is for, i.e., not a finished kitchens or pure discussion post.

  • sochi
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I can try to set it up over the next day or so, although I am pretty ignorant of French Country. Lavender, would you want to set it up?

  • lavender_lass
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Thanks, Sochi...but I haven't even figured out the mood board, yet. I have contractors out every day, working on my house. I've had time for a quick comment, here and there, but no time to concentrate on anything for more than a few minutes.

    Marcolo- Would you want to do it? That way you can clarify what the thread should be or not be. You did an excellent job, with the 1920s DAT :)

  • sochi
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Marcolo has done a few I think. I will give it a try if no one objects (I'm a total novice with French country). I should have time to pull something together this weekend.

  • palimpsest
    Original Author
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I don't think you have to know that much specifically about French Country. Just google some images. The parameters of the thread and any initial instructions would be similar regardless of the particular project.

  • jessicaml
    9 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    After months away from GW I've been spending waaay too much time reading these old DAT threads. While I've enjoyed them all thus far, the ideas represented here were the ones I could most envision actually using in my own home (or a theoretical future home). Thanks to all the talented contributors for sharing!

Sponsored
Bull Run Kitchen and Bath
Average rating: 5 out of 5 stars176 Reviews
Loudoun County's Expert Kitchen & Bath Renovation Firm | Best of Houzz