Cook's Country Corned Beef & Cabbage

jeri

Below is Cook's Country (free) recipe for Corned Beef and Cabbage.

My question is: Can I cook this in the slow cooker on high instead of the oven? Keeping everything else the same? I don't have a Dutch oven - well I did, but I gave it to my Dad and have not replaced it yet. I miss that pot! :-(

Thanks!

Corned Beef and Cabbage

1 (4- to 5-pound) corned beef brisket roast, rinsed, fat trimmed to 1/4 inch thick

4 cups low-sodium chicken broth

4 cups water

12 carrots, peeled (3 chopped, 9 halved crosswise)

2 celery ribs, chopped

1 onion, peeled and quartered

3 bay leaves

1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns

1 tablespoon minced fresh thyme

1 teaspoon whole allspice

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 1/2 pounds small red potatoes

1 head green cabbage (2 pounds), cut into 8 (2-inch) wedges

Pepper

Instructions

1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 300 degrees. Combine beef, broth, water, chopped carrots, celery, onion, bay leaves, peppercorns, thyme, and allspice in Dutch oven. Cover and bake until fork slips easily in and out of meat, 4� to 5 hours.

2. Transfer meat to 13 by 9-inch baking dish. Strain cooking liquid through fine-mesh strainer into large bowl, discard solids, and skim fat from liquid. Pour 1 cup cooking liquid over meat. Cover dish tightly with aluminum foil and let rest for 30 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, return remaining cooking liquid to Dutch oven, add butter, and bring to simmer over medium-high heat. Add potatoes and simmer until they begin to soften, about 10 minutes. Add carrot halves and cabbage, cover, and cook until tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer vegetables to serving platter and season with pepper to taste. (Reserve cooking liquid for making Creamed Chipped Beef using leftover corned beef; recipe at right.)

4. Transfer beef to carving board and slice against grain into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Serve with vegetables.

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Comments (17)
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sushipup1

That's how I do it, in a slow cooker. But use beer instead of water.

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donna_loomis

I spotted this today, too. Sure, you CAN cook it in a slow cooker, but I don't think it will be the same. I've tried the same recipes for braising a roast in th oven and putting it in a slow-cooker and the results are different. I'm going to give this one a try.

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jeri

I don't think it will be the same.

Darn!

Well... I don't have a Dutch oven (cries), but I do have an oven safe pot. Will that work just as well?

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sushipup1

It might not be the exact same, but it will still be delicious!

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donna_loomis

I think any pot with a good fitting cover will work just fine.

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annie1992

I agree, it won't be exactly the same, but it'll be delicious, I often cook corned beef in my crockpot. It comes out tender and good, but shreds more than it slices.

Annie

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jeri

This was the other recipe I was thinking about trying. It Is from "A Year of Slow Cooking". It's just that Cook's Illustrated has never failed me...

3 pounds corned beef, trimmed of fat
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon prepared Dijon mustard
10 whole cloves (or you can use 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves)

Use a 6-quart slow cooker. Unwrap the corned beef and trim as much of the fat from the meat as you can. In a small bowl, make a paste of the honey, brown sugar, mustard, and cloves. Rub this mixture on all sides of the meat. Place the meat into your crockpot, and cover. Cook on low for 8 to 10 hours, or until meat pulls apart easily with a fork. Let sit for 15-20 minutes before slicing.

Thoughts on this recipe???

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Teresa_MN

I think it sounds fantastic. I personally would not use cloves - but I don't like that flavor. And I don't like cinnamon either. So don't let that influence you. :-)

But the cooking method is yet another one I will try. Love the idea of the paste.

I receive CI magazine - how did I miss that? Thanks for sharing!

Teresa

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lindac

You need to cook a corned beef in a fair amount of liquid or it will be very salty.

I know there are a lot of people who's tolerance for salt is much higher than mine....there are recipes that people love that are a chuck roast in a covered roaster with 12 oz of canned beef broth and a package of Knorr onion soup mix.....delicious to some but more salt than I find good.

I know I am less tolerant of very heavily salted foods than some...But I don't have high blood pressure and I love pretzels and chips and salty snacks....but can't stand overly salty meats, soups and other dishes.

The traditional New England way of cooking corned beef is to boil it....It's really a good thing.

Here is a link that might be useful: corned beef and cabbage

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soonergrandmom

I cook the meat in the pressure cooker. I do the veggies then add the meat to them. I don't like it to be too salty either.

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

Pressure cooker is a great way to cook Corned beef. Quick and easy. You can take the meat out and taste it, if it is not tender enough, put it back and cook some more.

Normaly I don't like food too salty, except corned beef.

Imagine this:

If you cook a slab of brisket in water for a long time, than throw away the water. You will end up with a tasteless piece of meat. That's what you will be doing if you cook CB in lots of water. All the wonderful corned beef-ness is gone.

The way I have been doing it is to soak the CB in water over night to get rib of only the salt before cooking.

I like the more salty CB for sandwiches and making hash.

We all have different tastes.

dcarch

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anoriginal

I'll probably be doing a combo recipe...first boil till just about done. Then I'll let it cool a bit before smearing on a rub... kinda similar to the honey/brown sugar/mustard idea, but with a few more spices. Back into oven till it gets a little crust... any fat that's left on corned beef pretty much "goes away". I like to let it cool before slicing... one of few times I'll dig out electric knife... seems to slice better with that. Might pull out stove-top smoker to use instead of back in oven... a semi-pastrami finish that way.

Potatoes and cabbage goes into liquid corned beef simmered in. Have a bag of fresh brussel sprouts that I'm gonna sub for cabbage... just cuz I have them and I can.

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Teresa_MN

Dc - I mentioned the water bath in one of the other corned beef thread. A good way to get rid of some of the salt.

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shambo

DC, I do something similar with our corned beef. My husband is on a salt-restricted diet, but he & I dearly love corned beef. So when it's on sale for St. Patrick's Day, I get a hunk and soak it for two days, changing the water at least 2 times a day. Then I cook it in fresh water in my slow cooker. Once the water comes to a simmer/boil in the slow cooker, I change the water again. I know I'm losing flavor, but these are necessary steps for his health's sake. Yet in spite of all that water, the corned beef tastes pretty good -- much milder than regular but tasty nonetheless. So we can enjoy a corned beef & cabbage dinner and corned beef sandwiches for lunch the next day. And no swollen, painful feet or congested lungs from over indulging.

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lindac

Shambo, you can add lots of stuff to the final cooking water, like bay leaves, mustard seen celery seed, a couple of whole all spice berries. There are lots of ways to get flavor into the corned beef with out excess salt.
I am not salt restricted so I don't do the soak and re-soak, just simply simmer in water to cover, usually about 2 quarts, and the leftover broth is very VERY salty....way too salty to think of using but for a cup for flavoring a soup of something.
I wonder if some corned beef is saltier than some other?

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jeri

Cooking in the oven right now - boy does the house smell good!

But! Suddenly no one will be home tonight! My youngest daughter will not be home until Thursday and is begging me to not serve this meal until then. I suppose (following directions for make ahead) I can keep the meet and broth separate until Thursday and cook the other veggies then???

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annie1992

Jeri, I think that will work out fine. The reheated beef might even slice more nicely, but I don't think I'd try to keep it much past thursday.

Annie

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