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Big Houses,Big Money, Small Kitchens

pkspigs
13 years ago

I do NOT want to talk down anyone's house here on this forum, but every time I look at pix posted here of the new houses people are building, etc, the kitchens seem very, very small to me. I don't know if that is the way the photos come out or if indeed, it is fact. If it is fact, why do people build such beautiful houses and have such tiny kitchens? I would think this would be one of the larger rooms in the house besides the den,great room or living room? I know that just about every time I look at a new build on here, I just cannot stand the size of the kitchens, just my thoughts, nothing personal to anyone here, pk

Comments (60)

  • gumper97
    13 years ago

    Our kitchen will be 231 square feet, in a house size of 2600 square feet, which puts it at almost 9% of total square footage. That is kitchen space only and does not include the breakfast nook.

    Frankly, it's the biggest kitchen I have ever had, and bigger than most kitchens I have seen in person. We are coming from a kitchen that's more like 150 square feet. I feel like I am not going to know what to do with all the space.

    Plenty big enough for me.

  • frog_hopper
    13 years ago

    Before you can compare kitchen sizes, you have to define just what constitutes a "kitchen." It may be easy if the kithen has four walls, but difficult with an open floor plan.

    Do you include the pantry, which is remote in some designs, while being integral in others? How about a computer nook? A lot of today's designs include one in the kitchen area. Then there is the breakfast nook. Some people consider that part of the kitchen, while others think of it as a separate area.

    The plan we are working with has a 234 sf kitchen, in its current incarnation. That doesn't include the pantry, which is nearby, but not in the kitchen. Nor does it include the computer nook, which is adjacent to the kitchen, nor the passage space between them. It does include the breakfast bar, but there is no breakfast nook.

    Oh yes, I should add that I don't cook. At least, that's what my wife claims. :-)

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  • allison0704
    13 years ago

    Why would anyone include the great room as part of their kitchen?

    I'd have to disagree about blending, meldy_va. We purposely dissected our kitchen so it was not one large room containing everything within four walls. I wanted an unkitchen as much as possible - while still very functional. Therefore, if all dimensions are not included, it's not a true number and not comparable to a kitchen contained within four walls.

  • demifloyd
    13 years ago

    My kitchen alone is approximately 20 x 15.

    That does not include the 6 x 6 pantry or the laundry room, which is around 14 x 8.

    The house is 4300 sq. ft.; I think the rooms are about the right size for my house; I designed the house and the allocation of space works for us. My kitchen was intentionally designed to be simple and functional for our needs and the way that we cook and entertain; I do not like guests in my way in the kitchen and I've found the larger the kitchen the more people hang out!



    I have never considered any of the homes I've seen on this forum to have disproportionately small kitchens, I suppose it's all in the eye of the beholder.

    Keep the photos coming though, it's fun to see such nice homes.

  • lindybarts
    13 years ago

    I do NOT want to talk down anyone's house here on this forum, but every time I look at pix posted here of the new houses people are building, etc, the kitchens seem very, very small to me.

    I haven't seen that at all. In fact, most are very spacious! I agree with some of the other comments that size doesn't matter, but rather how does it function. I'm very happy with the layout of mine. I was worried mine would be too spread out but the work triangle ended up to be just right.

    I'll second kate's request. Let's see your kitchen pkspigs.

  • chiefneil
    13 years ago

    Here's mine. I don't know how big it is, but it's big enough for me! The fridge and pantry are just off to the left of this photo. For scale, that's a 36" 6-burner rangetop under the 42" hood.

    I think a curious thing about kitchens is that they can be big enough but at the same time you can never have enough space in a critical area. That cabinet to the left of the stove is jam-packed with stuff I need in arm's reach, while other cabinets further away are practically empty. Likewise the countertops within arm's reach of the stove can get way crowded while cooking, while two steps away the counters are bare.

    I'd also add that everything is a tradeoff. If you want the kitchen to be 2' larger, where does the space come from? Do you shrink the adjacent bedroom from 14' to 12'? Very few people have the budget for a no-compromises design.

  • brutuses
    13 years ago

    Years ago I always admired big kitchens and would think to myself, "oh boy, I'd love to have a huge kitchen." Well, that was before arthritis and now I'm glad I only have to walk 10 steps in either direction to work in my kitchen. It's only DH and I, we have a built in pantry, so we really don't have a need for a large kitchen. We built the house so the kitcen is open to the great room, thus eliminating that congregation of everyone in the kitchen. They can sit at the counter and be within a few feet of everyone in the great room. It's a perfect set up for us. I still admire large kitchens, but more importantly I've learned it's not the size of the kitchen that matters, it's the function it provides. I think large families and lots of entertaining and cooking require large kitchens.

    Here are photo's of my kithen at the beginning of its' installation. The room on the right in the background is the pantry and the room on the left is the laundry.

    Here is the view into the great room. Sorry, it's a mess right now.

  • suero
    13 years ago

    When I look at these kitchens, I can't help but remember my grandmother's kitchen. It was a typical NY apartment kitchen, range on one wall, sink on the opposite wall, and refrigerator, small counter top (maybe 2 feet) and broom closet perpendicular to the sink and stove. She had a work table next to the sink. I'd guess that the entire kitchen was no more than 7'x10', yet she would bake up a storm, including homemade strudel, stretching the dough to 3'x5' on a linen cloth on the work table.

  • chisue
    13 years ago

    I'm going to sound like Greta Garbo, but...no pictures.

    Our kitchen space is 16 X 22 (352 sq ft). The island runs lengthwise for about 9 feet. On the wall behind the island seating is a buffet, door to DR and desk. In between is
    walkthrough space. If I lop off that side, the workspace becomes 10 X 22 (220 sq ft).

    Breakfast room (not separated from Kitchen) is 12 X 13 (156 sq ft).

    'Back Hall' contains supply closet and laundry; has three doors (to Kitchen, to Garage, to Back Yard). That's 8 X 22 (176 sq ft).

    Off the Back Hall is a half bath, 8 X 3.5 (28 sq ft).

    The total HVAC-ed house is 2900 sq ft. on the first floor. There is also an unfinished full-height attic with walk-up staircase that's another 3000 sq ft. (For a future owner to finish.)

    Add it up as you wish. It could be:

    Workspace only -- 7.5% of 2900 (or 4% of 5900)

    Workspace/Buffet/Desk -- 12% of 2900 (or 6%)


    Extended room w/Breakfast Rm. -- 17.5% of 2900 (or 8.6%)

    All the above + Back Hall -- 23.5% of 2900 (or 11.6%)

    Now it's time for me to get out there and nuke something!

  • jenanla
    13 years ago

    We are currently building a New/Old home. The overall sq. footage is 4200sf. including a walk-up attic and bonus room over the garage.

    My kitchen in comparison to most new builds in my area is (intentionally) small.

    The length of the kitchen is 13.5 ft and the width is 19.5 ft. (about 7ft. of the width is actually walkway from mudroom to the rest of the house). I didn't want my kitchen to be an overwhelng size (not a serious cook). I wanted minimal cabinetry so I have a 12' x 6' walk-through pantry. To achieve a larger "feel" in the kitchen there are 20 ft. cathedral ceilings, a triple window over the sink, double french doors (on the walkway side of the kitchen). The kitchen also opens up to a seating area and fireplace.

    I cut down on the cost of cabinetry and will hopefully achieve an "older" looking kitchen when we are complete.

    Pantry

    Sink Wall

    Kitchen Beams

    Kitchen Fireplace

  • bevangel_i_h8_h0uzz
    13 years ago

    Interesting thread! Unlike OP, I would have said that most of the kitchens I see posted here and on the kitchens forum strike me as enormous and absolutely gorgeous! But then, for the past 25 years, I've been living in a house with an 8ft x 8ft kitchen! Just a four foot wide walkway down the middle with a sink and two 2.5 foot spans of counter-top on one side and the fridge, stove and one additional 16 inch span of countertop on the other. I have DREAMED of the day I could have a 400 or 500 square foot kitchen!

    Still, when it came time to actually design my new kitchen (house is in the process of being framed up now!) that 400 to 500 sq ft dream wound up giving way to other needs since I too don't have an unlimited budget.

    Ultimately, after giving careful consideration to my desire NOT to have my sink and cooking area visible to drop-in company, my desire to allow party guests to converse with me in the kitchen while NOT getting underfoot, and the whole tried-and-true concept of the work triangle, I wound up with this design...


    (this is just a quick sketch done on Paint so it may not be perfectly to scale but is fairly close.)

    Since it is a rather odd shaped space, I'm not sure what the exact square footage is but not counting the breakfast nook area, I think it is about 190 sq feet and with the breakfast nook comes to about 275. The pantry/mud-room is another 80 sq feet so even counting it in, I'm still below 400 sq feet total.

    I tried to design the area to provide plenty of countertop work space and convenient storage while keeping my work triangle compact enough that I wouldn't need roller skates to fix a meal. LOL!

    I'm also hoping that the "P" shape will encourage guests to congregate in the breakfast nook area (which will have a built in booth) and flow on out into the great room which is partially visible from the sink but that it will subtly discourage them from lingering in my work triangle area. That's also why I stuck the bar sink near the breakfast nook and put the fridge where it is the first thing you reach when coming from the nook.

    No doubt, many people would consider this a tiny kitchen but since it will be something like 3 to 4 times bigger than what I have now, it's going to feel humongous to me! Can't wait till we get to a point where I can share pictures.

  • frog_hopper
    13 years ago

    Bevangel, I like your kitchen design. The only thing I wonder about is the corner of the elevator room intruding on the intersection of the two counters. I can't decide if that would bother me or not.

  • rileysmom17
    13 years ago

    What I have noticed from photos is that there is a lot of wasted space between two work surfaces, especially in kitchens with triangular central islands. For greatest efficiency you should not have to take more than 1 generous step between surfaces (for example, the when the sink/prep area is behind you as you face the stove). When more than one person cooks in a kitchen at the same time, they need distinct personal work space not double-wide passing lanes. When I am swinging a heavy pot out of the oven I do not want to have to carry it across a wide aisle to put it down.

  • bevangel_i_h8_h0uzz
    13 years ago

    Froghopper - re the elevator intruding into the corner: That's a good observation and something I'm a little bit concerned about myself. After thinking long and hard about it, I finally decided it was a good way to use what would otherwise be a blind corner. Two of my SILs are always complaining about stuff getting lost in the blind corners in their kitchens. Apparently things sometimes fall off of lazy susans when you spin them and then someone has to has to get down on hands and knees, take everything out of the blind corner cupboard, and climb in to retrieve the lost item.

    Plus, I couldn't move the elevator more than a foot or so further from that spot without totally redesigning the upstairs rooms.

    SIL#3 has her cooktop enclosed in an arched brick alcove that isn't as wide as the total width of my stove and adjoining cabinets. She only has about 12 inches on each side of her cooktop till she reaches the wall of the alcove. It doesn't bother me to use her kitchen and I've gotten pretty used to having a refrigerator 16 inches from the edge of my stove. So I guess I can live with the wall being there. Actually, I guess I'm going to have to now. LOL!

  • brutuses
    13 years ago

    One thing I will add, I think the main thing for me in a kitchen is having enough counter space, not necessarily floor space. When my kichen island is finished it will house the stove and be 36 sq. feet, plus the counter that's on the sink wall that's about 18 sq. ft. Having the room to spread out and prepare the food is the most important thing for me.

  • ajpl
    13 years ago

    We have a kitchen that is about 165sqft in our 1800 sqft home. That's about 9%. Then we have an attached dining area and a 6X6 pantry. I think it's going to be lots of space when we're done. We spend a lot of time in the kitchen or around it but I also don't want to be running laps around it to cook my meals.

    I think it's much more important to design a kitchen that meets your needs than to build it simply for size.

    My tiny kitchen is plenty big to bake all of our bread, sweets and meals, make jam and pickles each year and even make cheeses and other farm foods. We probably put up more food than most people I know and I'm not worried about the size of my kitchen at all.

  • fairytalebaby
    13 years ago

    I don't have a big house OR a big kitchen...so I shouldn't even be interested in this thread. I just keep waiting for the OP to come back and respond (with pictures) and show us all how it should be done right!

  • kats
    13 years ago

    I've never thought any of the kitchens on this forum were totally out of proportion to the size of the home. In fact, many of the kitchens built here were inspirations for my final design.
    I think something the OP needs to keep in mind is that pictures can be deceiving. It doesn't look like it but the distance from the counter where I took the picture to my small island (1st photo with my dog) is 8 feet. My large island (main sink) is 16 feet long but doesn't look that long in either photos showing it. My kitchen is the same size as Allisons at 600sq ft. That includes the nook but not the pantry (if I remember that's 12x6). I could have enlarged the kitchen space by moving the main island towards the greatroom but "WHY"... I love my kitchen, it's my creation and it WORKS for me...and as she echoes Forest Gump..."that's all I have to say about that...;

    An example of what OP might be trying to say (though again, I don't think it applies to the homes I've seen here) is my sister's new home. They just bought their very first home, a 3900sq ft home. And...she "hates" her kitchen. It's way to small...(plz don't ask WHY they bought this house b/c I don't have a clue"! Anyway, I haven't seen it yet but her last kitchen was about 10x12 so this new kitchen must be really tiny. She says it only has 4 cabinets in the whole kitchen so they're going to build another kitchen in their basement!...Ok!!?!!

  • momtothree
    13 years ago

    demifloyd-- Can you tell me how big your island is? I love it.

  • pkspigs
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    Well, I told you all in the beginning that I was NOT slamming anyone's kitchens. But from some of the Snide remarks, some of you all must have an esteem problem about your kitchens. I was only asking do they seem little or are they really little. and NO I won't post any pix of mine, because: 1) it is in need of an overhaul, 2) it could not compete with any of yours.

  • lindybarts
    13 years ago

    I don't think anyone was being snide. Just surprised at your observation that there are many small kitchens that have been shown here. I think most of us think just the opposite.. Very large and spacious kitchens. So again, what do you consider a small kitchen?? Not being snide, just curious as to how you arrived at your assessment.

    :c)

  • chiefneil
    13 years ago

    I don't know how many large homes pkspigs has been in, but there may be some confusion about how large a kitchen can/should be in practice. You really wouldn't expect the kitchen in a 10,000 sq ft home to be 2x bigger than one from a 5000 sq ft home. In fact kitchen in my 5300 sq ft house is roughly the same size as the one I had in my 4000 sq ft house and I'm perfectly happy with it.

    Once you hit a certain size - for any room not just kitchens - that's "big enough". I think many of the kitchens posted on this thread are more than "big enough" and probably wouldn't benefit much from being larger.

  • carolyn53562
    13 years ago

    Size is a personal thing. My kitchen was built to be efficient for us and it is perfect for us. Not counting the eat in area, our kitchen is probably only 15' x 12' (but the room including the eat in area is probably 15' x 24 although the eat-in part opens into the great room so there is no wall at that end). Our island is only 52" x 38". Our new kitchen is almost identical to the kitchen in our old house except the island is a foot longer. If we built a new house, I would add another foot to the island, but wouldn't change anything else. I would not want a larger kitchen. Our house is 3,200sf above grade with another 900 or so finished in the basement. If our house was bigger, I still wouldn't want a larger kitchen.

  • kellyeng
    13 years ago

    I know that just about every time I look at a new build on here, I just cannot stand the size of the kitchens, just my thoughts, nothing personal to anyone here, pk

    This is the only snide statement I saw on this thread. And by the way, you can't qualify a remark with, "I'm not being personal" and then say something personal. It just doesn't work that way.

  • fairytalebaby
    13 years ago

    I don't know...maybe I was snide? I guess I just don't understand the questioning of someone else's build...

    In our new home, we tried to make every room as big as we could while still staying with what we could afford. In the kitchen it's tough...because we chose to go with custom cabinets and granite tops...so while the room itself might not be as big as "expected" it's filled with expensive items that make it a great space for us.

  • frog_hopper
    13 years ago

    The title of the thread alone, Big Houses, Big Money, Small Kitchens, says a lot IMHO.

  • kateskouros
    13 years ago

    i was snide. yes... yes i was.
    i thought the OP extremely critical of those kind enough to share the spaces they worked so hard on. the post is in fact, ridiculous.

  • vancleaveterry
    13 years ago

    The OP made a simple observation, not backed up by any facts to be sure, but certainly not a personal attack on anyone. Just a discussion starter.

    I don't think she deserved the remarks.

  • carolyn53562
    13 years ago

    I answered above and at that point decided to give the OP the benefit of the doubt about his/her questions. However, I do think that it is fair to question the motives of the OP. The reason for his/her post is unclear. She/he did not say that she/he was building a house or had just built a house or that he/she was trying to get information for her own build or that he/she was struggling with kitchen size, only that she was randomingly starting a discussion in this forum about her own personal tastes. And from his/her opening disclaimer, you can tell that the OP knew (was hoping for?) there would be some fireworks. The OP could have easily framed his/her question in a noncontroverial way like "how did you decide upon the size of your kitchen? Is it a % of square footage? Use? Cost? etc." but instead has a subject line that says "big houses, big money, small kitchens" and then says that he/she can't stand the size of the kitchens that he/she see on this forum.

  • kellyeng
    13 years ago

    Carolyn - perfectly stated.

  • mark_g
    13 years ago

    jenanla, can you tell me whose fireplace is pictured in your kitchen-fam room? It looks great. Are you pleased w/it? Thanks! --Mark

  • jenanla
    13 years ago

    Mark,

    I'm in Massachusetts and had a local mason do our 2 fireplaces. We love it! The dutch door opens to storage, not a true bread oven as more space was needed for the chimney to do so and we didn't want to lose additional sq. ft. on the 2nd floor.

    In case you are interested I purchased both the fireplace crane and Dutch door from a place called Lemee's Fireplace. Ironically they are in MA but do ship at a reasonable price.

    We can't wait until the mantel is installed and everything is up and running.

    Jenn

    Here is a link that might be useful: Dutch Door

  • Christine Decker
    13 years ago

    my kitchen is 18' wide by almost 28' long (not including the breakfast nook or the transition area along backside of bar area to family room. I find it perfect size and my house is 4800 square feet. They only downside is that it is a lot to clean all at once. I split it up over days so that it is easier.

  • lindybarts
    13 years ago

    cdecker...just gorgeous! I don't think I've seen your kitchen before. I don't see it in the FKB. LOVE it!

  • pkspigs
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    Good Lord, I've never seen a bunch as sensitive as you all are. All I said was I do NOT like small kitchens and were they that small or did the pix make them look that small. Then I said seems like if you are going to spend that much money on a house the kitchen should be a bit bigger, and it was just MY opinion, cause I don't know you or your houses. My,My,My. sorry about it all.

  • kellyeng
    13 years ago

    pkspigs, please refer to Carolyn53562's post. The way you worded your post was unnecessarily abrasive. Tact goes a long way when posting on a forum.

  • fairytalebaby
    13 years ago

    pkspigs,

    Have we met?

    Yes! Oh my gosh!!! You're that neighbor! The one who wants to see the new house and then says things like, "Hmmm, I would've thought a big ol' house like this would have a nicer kitchen" or.........."Why don't you have some pretty brick or stone on your fireplace?"

    LOL...I'm kidding of course. I'd never want to offend anyone.

  • lyfia
    13 years ago

    pkspigs - you still haven't answered what size you consider being small? What is small to you?

  • ncchuck
    13 years ago

    Well I realize this topic has proven to be quite controversial, but I, too, find myself wondering why someone would build a 4-5000 square foot house or larger and not have a kitchen big enough for a full catering staff. Only two of my houses which I have owned were over 3000 square foot and even they were designed with a staging area for caterers and large scale entertaining in mind. Perhaps lifestyles have changed in this day and time. It seems more and more people use their thousands of square feet for things such as multiple rooms to watch the tv in! (And before you jump all over me, let me admit that I am very much guilty of that myself.)

    In my former neighborhood which was a mix of custom and tract built houses, nearly every house, (especially the tract homes) in the 4000 square foot range had 4-5 bedrooms 3-4 family/liviing/bonus rooms and then a tiny 12 by 14 kitchen. I personally think that is disproportionate. They were probably built that way because kitchens are expensive to build. A room full of cabinetry and countertops is much more expensive than a room full of drywall. The way my neighborhood was built, a large number of the homes, even those built by custom builders, were built as speculative homes so naturally the builders wanted to cut costs.

    I think that on this forum most of the kitchens whatever size look like they are well thought out and very personal to the way the owner lives. Perhaps the OP was just making an observation about larger homes in general and not necessarily referring to specific kitchens he/she has seen on this forum. And I know he/she did reference garden web kitchens, but maybe he/she included other kitchens seen elsewhere.

  • sombreuil_mongrel
    13 years ago

    I had to laugh. I took a flight of fancy where every dimension grew as the sq ft'ge of the houses grew, until they were suitable for giants or I'd feel like I were two again. Kitchen counters were 4ft deep and 6 ft high, stairs were 14" per rise instead of 7", etc.
    The best point I heard is that once a kitchen reaches a certain size, further enlargement ceases to have any benefit.
    I have a 170 sq ft kitchen with 44sq ft of counter space, and it's ample; generous, even.
    Casey

  • learn_as_i_go
    13 years ago

    I built years ago and just like to review this forum periodically, so you don't hear much from me. I have an answer for ncchuck, however. The reason to build a large home with lots and lots of space for individual rooms is because we are doing more and more out of our homes. I don't need a bigger kitchen - but with my current lifestyle I would like to have more bedrooms. I use bedrooms now for many purposes other than beds; I like to exercise, do arts/crafts, provide a playroom for my child, and work out of my own home. I would enjoy having the luxury to have dedicated spaces for all of this without having to convert my parlor or dining room.

    If the question were posed differently - as we've already seen here on dozens of threads - as "why did you build a large home?" then I know that would be the answer provided. Few people need gargantuan kitchens...but we do like to have space to support our growing nesting tendencies.

  • acountryfarm
    13 years ago

    I haven't bothered to respond to OP but can't help myself.
    You seem to be trying to justify what you posted and continue to defend yourself. You also state that it was nothing personal and "we are all so sensitive"

    Please tell me you are joking. Your post was very personal indeed to anyone who might have posted a pic here. Your language choice may be the cause. You firmly stated " I just can't stand the size of the kitchens"
    How, may I ask is this not personal?
    Why would someone not defend themselves with this kind of insult.
    You also state you don't want to put anyone's kitchen down and then you go on to do just that. What gives ?

    Not having seen your name around these parts before, I wonder if you have much experience in web etiquette. Most of us here know how to communicate in a forum such as this. I think we all know how careful we need to be as there are no 2nd chances after something is posted. There is no ability to hear tone of voice, or see facial expression.
    I think you really offended some regulars and I can see why.

    This is a place for people to come and share, not defend. I don't think you communicated at all well and really need to think before you post.

    BTW - to the rest of you LOVELY, BEAUTIFUl, KITCHENS. This is such a great place and I love to see all the fab homes with spacious kitchens.

    p.s. my kitchen is almost 600 sq. ft. seems large to me. That does not count adjoining breakfast room and adjacent dining room.

  • kats
    13 years ago

    OP's can create a mess dumping their trash to get other's reactions. Sometimes it's intentional and sometimes it's a slip of the index finger. It happens all the time though hopefully this thread wasn't intentional (say it aint so!). It does bring to mind something a dear friend sent to me the other day. Hope you all don't mind... it is a bit philosophical... but since getting it I'm looking at life like a "trash truck" so just wanted to share and sorry if it's inappropriately to deep .....especially before morning coffee!!!
    ;)

    One day I hopped in a taxi and we took off from my hotel for the airport. Suddenly a black car raced out of a parking space right in front of us. My driver slammed on his brakes, skidded, and missed the other car by just inches! The driver of the other car whipped his head around, waved his finger and started yelling at us. My taxi driver just smiled and waved at the guy....I mean, he was really friendly.

    So I asked, 'Why did you just do that? This guy almost ruined your car and sent us to the hospital!' This is when my driver taught me what I now call, 'The Law of the Trash Truck.'

    He explained that many people are like Trash trucks. They run around full of garbage, full of frustration, full of anger, and full of disappointment. As their garbage piles up, they need a place to dump it and sometimes they'll dump it on you. Don't take it personally. Just smile, wave, wish them well, and move on. Don't take their garbage and spread it to other people at work, at home, or on the streets.

    The bottom line is that successful people do not let trash trucks take over their day. Life's too short to wake up in the morning with regrets, so..... 'Love the people who treat you right...then say a prayer for the trash trucks.'

  • oruboris
    13 years ago

    A few years back I toured a 10k+ft. home with a 3 story atrium, music room, billiards room, drawing room and a kitchen of know more than 200ft. with ugly green formica, lower end appliances.

    Why?

    Because the homeowners never went in there. Food prep was for 'the help', who would just have to make do.

  • amyks
    13 years ago

    Hi kats, always good to see a familiar face!! I love that analogy, I think it is perfect for this thread. "trash trucks" only make life upsetting if you let them.....

    I loved seeing pictures of everyone's kitchens again, they are all beautiful to me.

    Amy

  • breezy_2
    13 years ago

    I've not seen the big house small kitchen syndrom here on GW but have seen it elsewhere and it baffles me. We were just riding and looking one day and looked at a nice spec house (need I say more)that was about 3200 sqft in a very upscale neighborhood...not huge mind you but total working/workable kitchen counter space was 30 inches and I am not exaggerating. I have seen bigger kitchens in 2 BR apartments.

    For the most part, the kitchens I have seen here are shown b/c they are show cases and beautiful. They certainly had a hand in how ours was designed. Ours is large by many peoples standards but just right for us (although I could have gone bigger).

    Kats, your kitchen layout looks similar to ours. What are those floors? They are beautiful!

  • shequit
    13 years ago

    This could be a new post called "why I have not posted my kitchen".
    I have been around GW for a couple of years (mostly kit forum) while doing kit, fm rm due to a disaster. I could not have done the job (I did my own GC) without the help of folks on this web. I lurked here cause it gave me lots of ideas about new construct for my very complete redo.
    I feel like I did a very good job but when I read an OP opine like this, forget it, I would not need the negative vibes.
    Thank you to all of you who have posted your absolutely glorious kitchens. It helped me tremendously in my decisions and I will tell you, without your help, I would not have had such dramatic results.

  • kats
    13 years ago

    shequit
    I for one would love to see your kitchen . It takes a lot to design a workable kitchen. Takes a lot to make it something that you will enjoy for years and years. But anyone that does their own GC in this monster difficult type room IMHO has something to be really proud of.

    Amy
    good to "see" you here too. How's the house?

    breezy 2
    Thanks for the nice compliment. I would love to see your kitchen and see what great minds that think alike can do! My floors are rustic Siberian white oak, unstained 8" planks. It is by far the most complimented feature of our home and also the easiest floor to care for I've ever had. Love it!

  • shequit
    13 years ago

    Thank you, Kats, for the "pump-up". I need that.
    It was truly a major effort doing so much myself as far as plan and design and getting the work done. Did I mention that the first set of custom cabs were the WRONG color?

    You did a beautiful job with your kit/fam rm areas. Very tied together and so warm and welcoming. I remember when we built this house how many decisions (we GC'd the house). That was thirty years ago.

    I can do photos in e-mails but not handy about getting them here. If you would allow, I will try to send you some e-mails - I owe a few others and about time I got around to it.

    BTW, I love your doggie. He/she looks like a sweet lover.
    MK (aka Mary Kay)

  • amyks
    13 years ago

    Hi kats! The house is almost the exact same as when we moved in. We still haven't sold our other house yet, and are trying to rent it out so we can get some relief from that payment. So I promised DH until that happens, I will not spend money. I'm actually pretty good at not spending, so I have kept true to my word, but boy could this place use some love! I need rugs and etc. etc., and lots of it!

    All in good time, though. I hope you are thoroughly enjoying your summer, and getting some riding in (I believe if I remember correctly you and your DH own motorcycles?!) and loving that gorgeous view every day. I love our land, and this spring/summer has been so great for the kids, watching the baby deer and their mamas, and the fox and all the great wildlife we have. They have planted a great vegetable garden with their dad, I don't know who loves that more, them, him or me because I get to eat it!

    Take care,

    Amy