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greedygh0st

SRQ Cuttings + My favorite rooting method

greedygh0st
8 years ago

On Monday I received my SRQ order and I wanted to post some pictures.

I am being very selective about new additions at the moment, and when I got this box I was so proud of myself because each one had exactly the type of look I am most attracted to.


Hoya siariae yellow pink SRQ 3133
Hoya sp. (GPS-4098) SRQ 3197
Hoya sp. Unknown Grey IML 1870
Hoya sp. UT-001 SRQ 3174

I see now that I should have switched lenses, but I was too lazy, sorry about the blurred lower half!



Hoya sp. UT-001 SRQ 3174

I owned UT-001 before, but I lost it. I just cannot tell you how much I love this Hoya. It is possibly my favorite, or at least in the top 10. The shape of the leaves, grey-green color, speckles, and their rough sandpapery quality is just so delicious. As you can see, Joni sent me one that was budding up! /joy


Hoya siariae yellow pink SRQ 3133

I ordered this plant on the Forest Treasures order, but it didn't survive the trip very well and I have been looking to acquire it ever since. I really really really really really like Hoya siariae and blashernaezii, which have similar leaves and similar growth. They grow like weeds in high sun, including direct western light. I have several varieties of siariae and would probably collect every color that was put forward.



Hoya sp. Unknown Grey IML 1870

I have been on the fence about this plant for a while because I was prettttty sure that I just wanted it because I love grey and it has grey in its name. (I secretly want that Grey Ghost carnosa, too, and can never justify buying it.) Annnyway, I am so glad that I went for this one, because as you can see, it has that type of leaf I like. Narrow, succulent, and rough as a cat's tongue. So neat!



Hoya sp. (GPS-4098) SRQ 3197

This plant is really neat. If you look at Joni's site, you can see that this leaf is to type. It reminds me of villosa leaves, only smaller and without the fur.

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Now, onto rooting.

In another thread Yuriyaa asked me to post a picture of my current preferred rooting method (I haven't forgotten about you, Yuri!), so here it is:

Now, just to be clear, if I think a cutting looks strong and it is spring or summer, I usually just pot it up and make sure it doesn't go dry. I keep it in with the other plants because they have established a favorable micro-climate, and just keep it up front where I can check on it daily.

I find during these seasons over-humidity can be an issue, specifically with bagging plants. Plants in an aquarium do great in any season, but I run out of room there.

So, that's what I probably would have done with these cuttings, except I wanted to show you my Rooting Method of Insane Greatness (named after Waffles of Insane Greatness).

This is my favorite method for several reasons:

-There is increased humidity from all the water in the vessel.
-Plants love rooting in hydroton and the roots they form seem to translate okay to dry mediums, unlike pure water roots.
-They can 'share' their rooting hormones - plants rooted together just seem to do better.

Those are my justifications, but it's quite simply the method I've experienced most success from. Even if I have a plant that is nearly dead, I can almost always save it this way. They will really hold onto life and give it a go, even if you only have a teeny sprig.

Here is my hydroton, beaker, and soaking Hoyas pre-setup.

My other rooting containers like this are typically broader, around 1' diameter. But I ran out of space in both of them, so I used this beaker, as I was only rooting 4 plants.

As you can see, the lowest set of leaves on all the cuttings are partially submerged. I might tug them upward a bit once roots start to form and the cutting is stuck in there better, but I've never had problems with these leaves rotting as long as I don't try to bag the vessel.

Note, I do not have success trying to fill the container halfway full of hydroton, insert the cutting and then pour more hydroton around it. It can be a pain to dig a cutting down into the hydroton if you already have others rooting there, but this is the only way...

The water level is high at this point because I didn't have time to soak my hydroton, so I'm planning on it going down overnight.

Anyway, that's what works for me.

This post was edited by greedyghost on Wed, Apr 23, 14 at 16:25

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