SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
bejay9_10

Using harvest - off season

bejay9_10
13 years ago

I hate to mention it - but I am getting some garden results from my October plantings. At least the lettuces, green multipliers and bok choy are overwhelming. Still waiting for broccolli, beets and cabbages to kick in - so I can have nice sauerkraut and freeze some soup veggies.

In the meantime, I've scoured the bottom of the freezer to bring up stuff to use now.

Sooo - the other day, I made some nice "health-bars" - the granola type - using my own home dried stuff like dried banana, toasted ground macadamia, cut-up dried prunes (in lieu of raisin) and instead of honey and molasses, found that a pint jar of orange marmalade (the glue) substituted just fine. I also added some chocolate mints - left from X-mas candy making. Actually, it was delicous. GD loved them for her quickie breakfasts.

One other salvage recently - an overabundance of canned/frozen plum sauce - added some wine to it, and used it to marinate a piece of brisket. - Hmmm - not too bad. I used the tenderized meat as filling for some tamales.

The tamales were OK - but somehow, the masa didn't taste quite right. I used butter and chicken broth and mixed it, but it seemed a bit doughy. Would lard be better?

Anyway - how are you using the harvestings in the offseason?

Just my 2 c's.

Bejay

Comments (31)

  • ksrogers
    13 years ago

    Lard was my aunts favorite way to make pie crust. Everyone always wanted to know how she got it to be so flaky. Today, I can't even think of using lard, but I would suspect its great for the tamales. Are they are corn based of wheat flour based dough? If its the latter, the use of bread flour can make them a bit chewy. Last week, Alton Brown made an apple pie and used Apple Jack instead of water in the dough. Also Alligator pepper was used as a spice in the filling. Here, I have quite a lot of limas I froze, and add them to some of my meat pies. At some point, I must also get all the red raspberries out of the freezer to make some seedless jelly. At the present time, I have about 30+ computers I am fixing, so the place is a big mess of computer parts everywhere.

  • lynn_1965
    13 years ago

    Bejay,

    I use lard and chicken broth when making tamales.

    Lynn

  • Related Discussions

    "Off - Season" for many of us.

    Q

    Comments (28)
    Merry Christmas & all the best in the New Year and many more. Wanted to revisit this thread so that some that did not get full advantage of all that was documented could find it now. This is a good time of year to start any searching of information, sources of products, etc., for our new season. Hope everyone is healthy and busy with what ever keeps them happy. Let's share some interesting thoughts and finds. Rick
    ...See More

    Cool Season crops in Z5...two harvests possible?

    Q

    Comments (5)
    I cut down the pea foliage(mid July) and add compost, then transplant four week old broccoli and cauliflower. This gives me a second crop of broccoli+cauliflower which are harvested end of Sept. to first week of Oct. Summer lettuce transplants(slobolt) are interplanted among the four week old cole transplants. This gives me lettuce when tomatoes come in. June 1, I transplant squash or pepper plants in areas where I pick spinach. Spinach beds are done by mid-June and the other plants take over until frost. I've also used the old spinach space for a second fall cole crop...direct seeded. Pole beans can be planted June 1 on the outer edge of a pea bed where they will climb on bamboo poles. Beans come in about 60 days from germination and will go until frost. Bottom line, (but this is Z4) make sure you have transplants in by July 1 for fall, or at least seeded. Beets+carrots+lettuce. Light levels(the sun) start to get low here by mid-Aug. with shorter growing days.
    ...See More

    Pepper Sauce / Harvest / Season Remaining / Pruning Question

    Q

    Comments (6)
    1. I usually just try to pinch them off if they're being stubborn. But, I'm sure a better way would be to cut them off rather than risk tearing a stem / picking more than the pepper. 2. Last year, I pruned the tops and roots way back and put them in (approximately) 1 gal pots. Rinsed the roots off and used fresh potting mix to try and keep the critters to a minimum. 3. Doesn't hurt to try. 4. I wouldn't worry about it. I dry mine together and haven't noticed a crossing of flavors. 5. no clue.
    ...See More

    My largest small harvest this season

    Q

    Comments (16)
    Hi Bill Are u moving? I didn't know! Well Hon, I have given up on the Habanero plants...they got as far as flowering but the weather is just going to cool down too much for them to produce anything now... The same with my Trinidad S. Those definitely need to be started early and I just did not have enough time. I might get that one Alma red but I don't know about the others! I am going to see if I can bring my black Cubans, black pearls, Takanosume and a couple other plants indoors and see if I can get them to finish inside then I think I am going to totally start all over again next season. Totally new plants, etc. unless JJ wants to keep a plant or two to take care of!! So I will have to check around for some of the seeds I need. And I DEFINITELY will get started early this year!! Oh by the way would you happen to have those two recipes you sent me last year? One was the Carribean BBQ sauce the other was a sauce or salsa that used part of a 7 pot pepper. I lost it when we moved! Thanks Bill!!
    ...See More
  • zabby17
    13 years ago

    Oh, bejay, please DO share your tales of February harvesting; it warms my heart to get to garden a bit vicariously, if nothing else!

    As for using the harvest, I've been trying to make better use of applesauce, of which I put up a fair bit this fall while still having some from last year. I'm a recent convert to the joys of steel-cut oats (which have become available easily at our grocery just recently) and find that oatmeal with applesauce, or, for a treat, some raspberry-rhubarb sauce, is a lovely cold-day breakfast.

    Z

  • gardengalrn
    13 years ago

    I've been using up tomato products like crazy. Most everything else is long gone, as I didn't put up much last year with the move impending. Zabby, what else do you use the raspberry/rhubarb sauce for? Better yet, recipe please? Lori

  • melva02
    13 years ago

    Bejay, do you have a recipe for chewy granola bars? I've been buying the expensive but delicious Kashi chewies, but the cheaper version from Costco doesn't have my favorite flavor Cherry Dark Chocolate.

    Last weekend I opened a big jar of roasted red pepper spread to use as pizza sauce (whole wheat dough and lots of vegetable toppings, with a sprinkling of feta instead of a layer of mozzarella). Tonight I used some of the remaining spread as pasta sauce, with a spoonful of canned tomatoes and another sprinkling of feta (got a big block at Costco). It was fantastic.

    Melissa

  • bejay9_10
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    Ken - the tamales are corn based (masa dough). I plan to use the rest - trying to pat out some tortillas. Perhaps 2 sheets of waxed paper might make it easier. I've tasted some really great tamales - but unfortunately not able to get the nuances of the recipe. Will keep trying.

    Zabby - Oats are reasonable here too. I do the granola thing, as I have all the nice dried stuff - apricot, plums, banana, macadamias that were put up last summer. For added value health-wise, in summer add commercial bran flakes - then eat cold. Lately, have added fresh bran grain to granola - then a quick microwave for hot breakfast. The fresh frozen boysens tossed in are always a treat. Love breakfast!

    Melva - Here is a recipe that I found just cruising the "web" - because I had so much orange marmalade around (really got carried away there), and GD has been asking for some granola bars for quickie breakfasts.

    The basic recipe - then toss in whatever (I like that idea).

    4-1/2 c rolled oats
    1 c flour
    1 tsp bakin soda
    1 tsp vanilla
    2/3 c soft butter
    1/2 c honey
    1/3 c pkd brown sugar
    2 c chocolate chips.

    I didn't have the honey or brown sugar, so sub'd the marmalade to hold it together.

    Also had left-over mint chips from x-mas cookies, some apricot leather, dried plums (cut like raisins), banana chips, in other words - any type dried fruits - maybe coconut, almond white candy.

    This is a great recipe to use up left-over cookie mixings and of course, was elated to find use for the orange marmalade. Which in summer, is also good for chicken barbecue basting in lieu of honey.

    I had to admit the granola bars were great. I cut them in small bar pieces and packaged in small baggies. Definitely a keeper. Easy - and all went thru the heavy duty mixer in a jiffy.

    About that fab red pepper sauce - great for enchiladas, and it spruced up those tamales a lot too. Like the idea of using on pizza topping. Need to make some dough soon to use up the big bag of "extra gluten" flour that I was hooked on awhile back.

    Just my 2 c's.

    Bejay

  • ksrogers
    13 years ago

    King Arther flour site has a nice recipe for a very bubbly crusty italian bread. I got an email yesterday and printed out the recipe. They made it using yeast, water, and flour, allow it to work over night, then add more yeast and flour teh next day for a very sticky bread. Its baked on a pizza stone. The photo looked really good with lots of big bubbles..

    Here is a link that might be useful: Italian bread recipe.

  • trsinc
    13 years ago

    Bejay, I've used the tamale recipe at the following link. My husband is Mexican and he loves them. It calls for veg shortening. Lard is traditionally used. I made the broth that I cooked the roast in with more spices than they call for. I have also used pork roast instead of beef.

    A tip for your corn tortillas... you can use wax paper or cut a large freezer bag so you have two halves. Make a ball of dough, place between the two sheets, and press down with a heavy cast iron pot. Works every time.

    I've never posted here before. This is the first time I've seen something I could contribute to... lol I sure have learned a lot here.

    tr

    Here is a link that might be useful: Tamale Recipe at Foodnetwork.com

  • melva02
    13 years ago

    Thanks Bejay, that looks great and I saved it in my google notebook. I will try it using whole-grain flour for part of the flour. The Kashi bars have 4g fiber and 6-7g protein, so maybe I will also experiment with adding more grains and less flour. I guess the reason other recipes are crunchy is because they're baked...never thought to make them "raw."

    Melissa

  • ksrogers
    13 years ago

    Alton Brown (Good Eats) also had a recent show about making the corn based flats. He even used a pickling lime soak to break down the skin barrier of the corn before grinding it down for the dough. I'm more partial to the flour type though and can make these in just a few minutes. I do add a bit of corn meal to the flour based dough. Lots of various grains at King Arthur Flour.

  • bejay9_10
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    Melissa - sorry I forgot to add the baking time to that granola bar recipe.

    It is 350 degrees for about 20 - 25 minutes - until browned on top. I used my lasagne baking dish to cook it in. I think it is more chewy if the mix is packed down somewhat when putting in the pan/baking dish before cooking.

    I like the idea of adding more grains to my baking. They are so much more flavorful. In my trials of sourdough bread, the different flavors are especially noticable. Last effort was with using rye, wheat germ, soy flour, barley, and adding fresh ground spice.

    Bejay

  • ksrogers
    13 years ago

    I am going to try and make a tomato bread sometime soon. Baked like an Italian bread and used with a a dipping sauce of herbs, garlic, olive oil, and balsamic vinegar.

  • zabby17
    13 years ago

    gardengalrn,

    The rasp/rhub sauce I made was from a classic Canadian low-fat cookbook called SMART COOKING by Anne Lindsay. Since rhubarb and raspberries are both high-acid items and Ball/Bernardin provides tested recipes for canning either in a BWB with sugar, I figured it was surely safe to can the combination.

    It was in the dessert section of the cookbook with the suggestion to put over ice cream. I it eat mostly at breakfast: over other fruit (like peaches), or on pancakes, or with yogurt or with oatmeal.

    (I am a convert to steel-cut oats for oatmeal. The texture is amazing, sort of like barley, which I love.)

    RASPBERRY-RHUBARB SAUCE
    from Smart Cooking by Anne Lindsay

    2.5 cups sliced rhubarb (half-inch slices)
    3/4 cup water
    1/2 cup granulated sugar
    grated rind & juice of a lemon
    1/4 tsp cinnamon
    2 cups fresh raspberries (you can also use frozen)

    In a saucepan, combine rhubarb, water, sugar, and lemon rind; bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat & simmer until rhubarb is tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from heat; stir in lemon juice, cinnamon, and raspberries.

    Makes about 3 cups.

    I processed this in a BWB for 15 minutes for half-pint or one-pint jars, which is the Bernardin gives for plain berries (it was slightly longer than that given for just rhubarb).

    Like bejay, I love breakfast!

    Gotta try those granola bars.

    Zabby

  • joybugaloo
    13 years ago

    I have been dipping into the roasted red pepper spread a lot lately myself...I call it "winter bruschetta." I like to eat it on homemade crostini, perhaps with some homemade mozzarella. YUM! But it's going way too fast--I may be down to my last jar. Too bad. The idea of using it as a pizza sauce sounds terrific. I will have to remember that tip for next year.

    Here's one for using up an abundance of applesauce: try cooking a 3-4 lb. pork roast in your crock pot with any herbs of your choosing (I like thyme, sage, and bay leaves), salt and lots of black pepper, a diced and sauteed onion or two (and perhaps a few cloves of minced garlic as well), a good glug of Worcestershire, and then a jar of applesauce thinned down with some stock. Let that bad boy cook all day while you're at work, then serve it over mashed potatoes or wide egg noodles, and boy howdy, will you be a happy camper!

    --Gina

  • ksrogers
    13 years ago

    I made about 35 jars of roasted pepper spread. I also used roasted garlic, as well as roasted onions, and added some balsamic vinegar to it. Almost good enough to put on ice cream! The roasting was done on my gas grill with some mesquite wood chunks as the smoke source. The peppers were mostly the thick meaty pimento types and they were all ripened to red color.

  • melva02
    13 years ago

    Thanks Bejay, I added that to my notebook. I'll try packing them down and maybe not cooking so long. I'll also try using some jam that I haven't gotten to. I hardly ever eat jam because I prefer butter on things.

    Zabby, I love steel-cut oats. The Irish way is to eat them with real buttermilk on top. I like mine with butter and salt. For some reason porridge to me needs to be salty, while rolled-oats oatmeal should be sweet. To that I add frozen berries and a banana if I have one. My dog gets his serving at that point, and to my bowl I add wheat germ and brown sugar. We both get cream on top. I need to eat cheese or something else salty with it, or it's not satisfying enough. I get hungry faster if I don't eat enough salt and fat!

    The whole grains and little bit of salt in the Kashi granola bars are just savory enough to make them a good snack for me.

    Melissa

  • bejay9_10
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    trsinc -

    I made a print-out of the tamale recipe. My shortcomings on the first attempt seems to be not cooking them long enough. Although, when I re-heated in the microwave, I made up for it by cooking/heating a bit longer.

    One other item of interest - the sauce is so similar to the dried red pepper spread recipe that I made from the Ball Book that - with only adding a few extra spices - cumin, etc., I saved myself making it - just opened a jar.

    Today, I think the rest of the masa needs attention, so will give the open plastic bag/heavy pot trick a work-out -to make some tortillas. I usually make pie crusts that way - but a rolling pin usually does the hard part. How about a heavy cast iron frying pan??? LOL.

    Thanks for the tip. Keep enjoying this fantastic forum.

    Bejay

  • zabby17
    13 years ago

    Gina,

    GREAT suggestion for the applesauce, which I will surely try soon! Pork roasts regularly go on great sale at our local grocery. Believe it or not, I don't have a crock pot --- since DH and I both work from home there's almost always someone here so we don't have much use for one. But I imagine a low oven would do as well? Say, about 200 degrees and leave it all day?

    >>boy howdy, will you be a happy camper!
    Hee hee. DH is a transplanted Tennesseean; he has no noticeable accent and doesn't use many southernisms, but "boy howdy" is one of the few that occasionally escapes him... (that and "I reckon") ;-)

    Melissa,
    I'll try the buttermilk! I will avoid trying the butter and salt because I'm afraid I might like it a LOT, and I'm working on REDUCING the amount of things I put fat onto, LOL! Like you, my weakness is for salty & buttery over sweet. I rarely bothered with jam in the past but I do find the ones I make myself to be good enough to be able to help me forego the butter on bread, etc. from time to time. Best for me to continue to think of oats as something fruit sauce goes on, not yummy butter....

    Our current dog has a delicate digestion and gets nothing but his kibble --- and, oddly, Cheese Whiz in his Kong for a treat, which doesn't seem to bother his stomach at all, while if anything else at ALL goes into him we all regret it!

    But our last dog LOVED anything starchy --- potatoes, oatmeal, rice, and especially BREAD. When we went on walks she would MORTIFY us by hoovering up bits of bread that people had scattered on their lawns for the birds.

    Z

  • trsinc
    13 years ago

    bejay, I just realized that you are using your left over tamale masa. I'm not sure if that would work for tortillas because of the butter in them and the soft consistency. You could try adding more masa flour to dry it up a bit. Usually corn tortillas have very little if any fat in them. I think they would still taste good if you can get them firm enough to form a ball.

    Sorry about that, I was thinking in terms of making corn tortillas from scratch (not using leftover tamale masa) when I gave you the iron pot trick.

    I'd love to hear if you succeeded. Sometimes I have left over masa and just throw it out. That is a good idea to use up the rest.

  • bejay9_10
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    trsinc -

    The masa flour for the tortillas will be made from the remainder of the bag of corn masa that I have left. No - I didn't have any mixed tamale (with butter and broth stirred in) left over from the tamales that I made.

    Sorry - I must re-read my posts, to make sure they are more understandable.

    Bejay

  • trsinc
    13 years ago

    No problem, bejay! I'm glad I didn't steer you wrong. :)

    Besides that, I'm now inspired about using tamale masa for other things such as improvised hush puppies or little pan fried corn breads/cakes.

  • lpinkmountain
    13 years ago

    I'm using my green tomato salsa to make the most delicious guacamole!

    I'm slowly but surely working my way through the marmelade from LAST year!

    And I made enchiladas this week with the chili sauce from this summer. I really love the homeade chili sauce, even though it is a royal pain to make due to the long simmer. Note to self: next summer grow paste tomatoes!

  • melva02
    13 years ago

    Zabby, I've never tried cultured (store-bought) buttermilk on my porridge. When I worked at Starbucks I would take home expired cream, culture it, and make butter. That's where I got the buttermilk I would drink and put on porridge. Commercial buttermilk tastes more like yogurt and is much thicker. Maybe there is a real dairy near you that makes traditional buttermilk? Otherwise you might try making butter. I can't find the website with the method I used to use, but the site below describes it well. The site I used said to re-pasteurize the cream by heating it to 160°...I think you had to maintain that temperature for a certain time maybe, and then when it cooled below 120° I would add yogurt as my culture and let it sit for a day or two. It worked great. I always found it hard to get all the buttermilk out when washing the butter (so it doesn't go bad), but it always turned out ok.

    Melissa

    Here is a link that might be useful: One butter-making site

  • zabby17
    13 years ago

    Melissa,

    Hm. I made butter as a project in my childhood a couple of times by shaking whipping cream in a jar. (Pretty exciting when you're a big-city kid who has never seen butter that didn't come in a foil-wrapped block.) And once or twice by accident when not paying attention while whipping cream with a hand mixer ;-). But it's not on the list of things I make regularly for myself. I do have young city-bred nieces coming to visit soon, maybe they'd like to try making some....

    We buy butter that comes from a dairy co-op in the region but it's not close enough to visit easily, alas ;-(. (Grateful that the local grocery stores stock it, mind you. Distribution is the real sticking point for local products, of course.)

    Don't you go tempting me to eat more butter, now! LOL

    Z

  • ksrogers
    13 years ago

    Accidentially made butter that started out as egg nog. It solidified very quickly. Wasn't sure what to do with it then. I guess it would have been good on toast.

  • melva02
    13 years ago

    A dairy co-op sounds great. There was an article in the New York Times on the comeback of small dairies (it focused on really high-end expensive ones). I would buy that here...actually I think it is possible to get organic unhomogenized milk but I'm not sure how local it is. I buy organic milk because I hope that kind of company treats the cows better. I wish raw milk were legal in Virginia. During summer I buy raw goat cheese on the black market if it's not sold out by the time I get there.

    For butter I use the spreadable butter/canola oil mix made by Country Crock. No margarine in it, just slightly more heart-healthy with the canola.

    I am in the process of signing up for my first community-supported-agriculture share! The most popular one in Richmond was already full, but I found a biodynamic farm that delivers here and has half-shares for $450 for 20 weeks ($22.50/week). I could easily spend that much at the farmers' markets, but I want to try the challenge of eating whatever they give me. I will grow tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, and herbs too, but I share the small yard with my downstairs neighbor who wants to grow flowers, and we won't be transforming the whole yard, just some borders and some containers.

    Melissa

  • bejay9_10
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    Melissa -

    Hmmm - not familiar with a community-supported agriculture share. From your post, I gather you pay them $450 for 20 weeks of whatever produce they - uh - produce.

    So - that means you might have to change your family's taste for turnips, instead of snap peas - maybe? The younger generation in these parts are hard pressed to even get the lettuce and tomato on a burger - to like, let alone a turnip!

    But it would be interesting to try to come up with some recipes to disguise what you are presented with. Come to think of it, I only came to eat broccolli after I grew up and my taste buds became dulled a bit.

    Tell me more about these organizations. California is so gov't regulated as far as growing things - it is doubtful that they would ever have something of that nature here.

    Just my 2 c's.

    Bejay

  • ksrogers
    13 years ago

    Grow some Jicima.! These are nice and crunchy, mild and are good either fresh or cooked. Kind of like a giant water chestnut. They grow like turnips. I use them pickled in my Californa Rolls (sushi).

  • melva02
    13 years ago

    Ken, I love jicama, and the ones at the store are all dried out because nobody buys it (but there are stores with more hispanic customers if I really needed it). Maybe I'll try growing it if there's room.

    Bejay, CSAs are popular around here. It's like buying stock in the farm because you take on some risk and you share in the edible profits. My family consists of me and my dog, and he only gets a taste of what I cook. Funny, I love the taste of broccoli. The only thing I'm scared of is the okra. If that's in the share I'll probably give back all but a few pods and make gumbo or curry with them. Shares can be picked up at a designated farmers' market or on the farm, and some CSAs also deliver. The one I'm joining is great because they give unclaimed produce to needy families. Here's a link to mine. Also check out localharvest.org which has a searchable CSA database. There may be one in your area but you just don't know it because you grow your own stuff! I'll let you all know how it goes. I will still be buying my large quantities of certain veg for canning at the farmers' markets. And there's only 3 more months until it's time to pick berries!

    Melissa

    Here is a link that might be useful: Ploughshare CSA

  • ksrogers
    13 years ago

    The local agway store used to offer coop frozen foods, but because some people ordered them and failed to pick them up, Agway decided it wasn't profitable enough. The frozen veggies were boxed in 3-5 pound plastic coated boxes, with no brand name. I kind of miss that stuff, but after BJ's and Costco came onto the scene their costs were a lot less. I kind of wonder if I can grow jicima here in my Z6. Never saw seeds of it, or any kind of plants or slips. Locally, there are a lot of hispanic people here, so its fairly fresh in the markets most of the time.

  • dgkritch
    13 years ago

    Bejay,
    Try google-ing "southern California CSA". There's a bunch!
    Deanna