SHOP PRODUCTS
Houzz Logo Print
wellspring_gw

Getting To Know Conifers?

wellspring
16 years ago

Hi,

I've been reading through old posts on this forum trying to get a sense of things. It really bums me that the search feature at GW has been out this winter when I'm much more cooped up and like to spend time learning and exploring garden issues. Before I attempt to form my question I'll give some background on me that may (or may not!) be helpful.

First, I am blind. There are a few that post here that already know that. Just thought I'd cut to the chase so that my questions can be put into that context if necessary. For example, I have two evergreen "situations" in my home landscape at present. The first is my "friendly" white pines (Pinus strobus, I suppose). They win my friendship because they are soft when encountered. They were planted -- possibly when the home was built (1974) -- in a row along the back fence. I can walk back that way trusting that when I come into contact with something it won't hurt!

My husband has told me that there are 3or is it 4Âof them. And, that's the point. Most people could look out my back window and count them. I can't. Because they are getting some size on them, they sort of blend into each other. Yes, you'd be right, too, that someone didn't take their mature size much into account. Our back property line is only 85 feet! The row originally had 2 more trees in it as we can find the stumps.

Second, I know a little bit about many things relating to the garden. I truly love to learn, but access to information is problematic. I can't grab a good reference text and bone up on a particular genus or conifer related issue. I do occasionally scan a print book on gardening, but it's often frustrating. Simple texts work well. Most serious garden books do not. Too many pictures and diagrams. Reference texts often have columns (that's my guess) or print forms in the borders or something. Anyway, they don't scan well. So I'm left to pick up crumbs of information where I can get them. Thank goodness for the internet. My voice synthesized computer can read most web pages fairly well.

Sorry about the personal bio, but it may be helpful.

Much of my initial information about plants that are new to me comes from the Missouri Botanical Garden website. I live in Illinois about 75 miles from St. Louis.

Okay, now to my current interestÂI would like to develop a border between my driveway and the property line. Unfortunately, that gives me only 9 feet of width to work with. The length of the bed will be about 20 ft. Right now this area is lawn. It's on the south of the house front, and east of the drive. SomedayÂoh, somedayÂthe west side of the drive will be a paved semi-courtyard right outside my front door.

I have one of those "welcome to my garage" houses. The driveway will be a strip of concrete dividing the courtyard on the west and this new border on the east. There's nothing I can do about that except try to diminish the problem. If the east side of the drive can sort of accentuate the idea of "courtyard" and "enclosure" then I think it will be an improvement.

What I am curious about is how evergreens may help me achieve my goal.

One of my ideas -- and it may be a stupid one -- is to continue the line established by a low wall on the other side of the drive. I don't want to build a wall, so I'm thinking a low evergreen hedge might please the eye and help "complete" the courtyard, if only in a suggestive way. I'm nervous about buxus because this is a fairly exposed spot in full sun. SoÂa low conifer hedge?

In addition to this "hedge" or green line marking the 9 feet from drive to neighbor's property, I'm thinking of including a fragrant diciduous shrub, probably a viburnum, somewhere in this border. Since flowers and leaves aren't on stage very long, I'm thinking a nice specimen / accent evergreen somewhere in this border will be helpful. Then maybe a trio of a truly small evergreen?

I'm imagining the main viewing direction for all of this is from the future courtyard looking across the drive to this border. That also means looking across and into the neighbor's front yard, so I will be thinking in terms of loosely screening that view. I don't think that it has to be a four season screen, because the courtyard will not be used as such in winter. Again, the hedgy thing I'm talking about would not be between the two properties, but rather connecting between driveway and prop line.

I could tell you some of the needled evergreens that have already caused my blood to tingle from the MOBOT website, but I'm curious what you guys think. My yard is small, so I try to choose very carefully with the result that I am kind of passionate about each plant that makes the cut. The plant does not have to be super uncommon -- sometimes tried and true is better and certainly easier to locate.

So, any thoughts? If you like the basic idea, any favorite suggestions for the conifers?

Wellspring

Comments (12)

  • coralbelle
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    HI Wellspring,
    I have the exact same situation as you do, a strip of land between my driveway and the neighbour's property. I planted mine about 5 years ago, and it is now a great delight, so much more pleasant than the old strip of mangy grass.
    I used a trio of conifers at the top of the driveway, nearest to the garage. I planted 3 Degroot's Spire cedars (Thuja occidentalis 'Degroot's Spire') and have been so pleased with them that I now have nine of these lovely shrubs on my property. They have a narrow columnar form, grow to about 9 feet tall, and only eighteen inches wide. The foliage is very pretty - tight whorls that remind me of Chamaecyparis obtusa. The Degroot's Spire is tough and at my place has been impervious to drought, wind, and bad winters.
    I also have a viburnum about halfway down the strip (I have Viburnum plicatum 'Shasta') which adds height, white flowers in May and gorgeous burgundy foliage in fall.
    I also added lots of ornamental grasses which complement the shrubs.
    This is a fun project and I wish you lots of enjoyment as you create your new border.
    Coralbelle

  • wellspring
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Hey, coralbelle, your response is very encouraging.

    I was concerned that my post wasn't specific enough about which conifers seem interesting to me. You posted while I was making a list for others to comment upon, and 'Degroot's Spire' was the first I moved from my journal into my comments. It's toward the bottom, purely alphabetical. MBG really likes this plant, too!

    Had to edit my note to respond to Coralbelle, but here's the list I was working on

    Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Filifera Aurea' It eventually could mature to 6-20 x 3-7. Sounds gorgeous, but would have to be placed just right. Maybejust scratch the rest and plant this one?

    But then I read through the rest of the Chamaecyparis that MBG hasOh, they all sound interesting! Am I doomed or what?

    Okay, I managed to make my way on to the junipers. How about Juniperus virginiana 'Grey Owl' (red cedar) H: 2-3 Spread: 4 to 6 feet zone 2-9 Silver grey, blue. Specimen, shrub border, hedge.
    The notes are lifted from the MBG comments on this cultivar. Is it hard to find? Better as specimen, or might 3 plants create my low hedge?

    Picea abies 'Acrocona' -- Wow! I don't know why, but I like the sounds of this one. Even I might be able to find the conesonly its eventual mature size is too big for current project.

    There are several others in this family that have me wanting to learn morePicea abies 'Nidiformis'. Sounds like you could carry it around for a few years before you absolutely had to decide where you want to put it! MBG suggests several as having the hedge potential -- Picea abies 'Sherwood Compact', for one.

    Pinus densiflora 'Low Glow' -- This one soundselegant? Height: 3-4 Spread: 3 to 4 feet zone 3-7. Would it be hard to find?

    Pinus thunbergii 'Banshosho' Height: 3-5 Spread: 3 to 5 feet zone 5-8. MBG says "grows to only 3 tall and to 5 wide over the first 10 years. Annual growth is 2-4". Key features include light green needles, abundant buds and numerous showy upright spring candles."

    Thuja occidentalis 'Degroot's Spire' -- Because it has both specimen and hedge potential and it sounds like its form is sort of unusual. Few cultivars of conifers get much rating notice at MBG. This one was rated by 2 visitors to the site and 2 of MBG's reviewers.
    One person wrote " I just bought 17 of these--10 feet tall. They are as close as we can get--in our frigid zone--to the Italian Cypress tree--in terms of shape and style. If form (sleek, vertical, pointy, and evergreen) is as important as function (hedge or specimen focal point), the Degroot's Spire is an excellent choice."
    Of course, that height would be a little more than I'd need for a hedge, but sounds like a fine columnar specimen. Narrow habit might be helpful since placement will be at a premium
    I'm getting a bit overwhelmed here, but sort of in a good way

    By the by, what the heck is a broom and a candle in the context of conifers?

    Wellspring

  • Related Discussions

    Any conifer experts know the exact name of this tree?

    Q

    Comments (2)
    i see you got an answer in the conifer forum ... Platycladus or some such ... frankly.. i have no clue on how they came to that decision based on these pix ... better pix would nail it down.. especially if it has those weirdo Platycladus cones ... see link i would have looked at the grave stones.. to get an idea of how many decades it took for this thing to grow.. and be pruned into this form ...i am thinking.. 30 to 50 years .. in my MI anyway ... maybe it will grow faster in your zone ... ken Here is a link that might be useful: link
    ...See More

    How to get the best color in conifers

    Q

    Comments (11)
    I'll go with full sun and have my soil tested. We have clay. I usually amend with soil conditioner, and sometimes a bit of manure when I plant or dig a new bed. Otherwise, it is one heavy mess. And I also plant a bit high. Should I not do this when I plant a conifer? I know the instructions that Ken posted said not to, but then conifers don't like clay soil? We have an irrigation system, and I had wondered about using it. I usually use it as little as possible, but during the summer, but when it is really hot, I feel that I have to. I also deep water any new larger plants every so often. I probably need a more consistent, reliable method. I'll start sticking my finger in the dirt, but it is hard not to use the irrigation system, because so many other things surrounding it will need it. We have been considered zone 7 forever, but now they say we are zone 8. Little difference, and I know it is still too late to plant. Can't I drop the pots in the ground where they are going to be planted? This will insulate them from the extreme heat, and they will be in the full sun as well. Plus they will make the beds look a bit better while I am waiting for winter. It will help me for planning later... I can't imagine a drawback from this, tell me if there is. I've already planted the Japanese White Pine, so now all I can do is hope for the best. I'm not in the best zone for conifers, but I know that there are some that do well here. I also requested a list of what works well at a garden in Jackson, so I will have an idea of what I can plant (somewhat) reliably. Of course, that isn't going to stop me from making rash decisions. Ken, I had previously saved your 'long view' post. I should have made sure I knew who I was talking about first. I also have saved posts from Dan, Dave, and Will. All of you have an amazing collection, and done a great job of landscaping with them. I guess if I am going to hang around, I should get everyone straight. : ) I have to have a de groots. That is one impressive conifer. It sounds like it will likely fit in the space, and grow tall enough quickly enough to give some height to that area. I had initially planned to put a sky pencil holly there, because I know they maintain a narrow profile, but good grief, they grow soooo slow. And de groots really does take my breath away every time I look at it. I also now know to look for one with a single leader. Sorry my posts are so long..brevity is not one of my strengths. And I warned you that I have lots of questions. Thanks,everyone, for all the great information. This is really helpful. Angela
    ...See More

    Where to get cool conifers

    Q

    Comments (5)
    hey ryan.. WELCOME to GW conifer world ... we are great enablers ... check out the link ... its a good start ... also copy paste this: http://search.gardenweb.com/search/nph-ind.cgi?term=conifer+sellers how about you give us some more facts .... near what city ... soil .. size of garden.. and precisely what you mean by small plants.. that can mean small for mail order.. or small in 20 years ... here is another link to copy/paste, for an intro to conifers: http://www.conifersociety.org/cs2/index.php?module=htmlpages&func=display&pid=3 come back often.. we need new blood to keep us going .... and NEVER FORGET ... the only stupid question .. is the UN-asked question ... we like to teach.. so anything is fair game ... ken Here is a link that might be useful: link
    ...See More

    Which conifer in your garden gets the most recognition?

    Q

    Comments (26)
    tsuga..I have tried several times for 'Green Arrow'. Each time it turned out to be something different. The last one by driveway turned out to be 'Pendula'. a perfect spot for it if 'Green Arrow'. When you buy these cultivars in 1-3 gal. they all look alike in initial growth. It looks like you scored on yours.
    ...See More
  • ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    hi and welcome ....

    a few thoughts .....

    first... let me disabuse you of the notion that MOST conifers stop growing at some magical height .... the key is to learn the annual growth rates .... once established.. MOST conifers will grow at that rate for the rest of your lifetime ..... most references regarding height are estimates at the 10 year age .... the 11th year ... they will be the estimate plus the annual growth rate ....

    that said.. as an example... i have the generic version of grey owl .. planted by the original owner some 20 years ago that are at least 15 feet tall ... and 20 feet across ... it is NOT appropriate for your space.. IMHO ...

    second .... de groots and low glow.. sound about perfect for your space ...

    third .... for one in your position ... you have left out the most fragrant conifers .... ones you can brush with a hand ... and they will send you on a flight of fancy .... i am not expert in naming these.. but i am sure a post something along the lines of "MOST FRAGRANT DWARF CONIFERS FOR ZONE 6" might get you some answers ...

    4th .... another post ... figuring that tactile pleasure is as important as anything else .... "the most touch friendly dwarf conifers for zone 6" ... might do you some good .... for example ... Abies concolor ... in fact a lot of the Abies.. will not bite you if you stumbled into them .... on the other hand... Picea pungens [blue spruce] and Juniper rigida .... will poke your skin and frankly sting you like a wasp at times ....

    i am trying to think here along the lines of your remaining senses... and how to heighten you enjoyment beyond the visual ...

    next... and really think this one out .... if momma is 386 feet tall ... a dwarf of her can be 250 feet tall .. perhaps not in our life times .... but they have the potential .... once again.. its all in the growth rates .... perhaps you need to look for "mini's" that grow 1 to 3 inches per year ..... a lot of these have to be secured through mail order ... there is a good tutorial at the American Conifer Society web page regarding growth rates..... i think it is titled as a tutorial .....

    as to a broom ... a 386 foot momma who grows 2 feet per year ..... might have a branch where the growth is only 2 inches per year .... there are conifer nuts who will climb her ... and take pieces and graft them ... resulting in what are called dwarves and mini's ... that is how most of such came into being ...

    candles... in spring.. when the buds burst forth .. the new growth is called a candle .... on some plants.. they can be spectacular in coloration .... again.. back to the growth rate ... if it grows one foot .... per spring .... you can cut back the candle ... ONLY IN SPRING to 6 inches .. and if timed properly .... it will reset buds for the next spring ... this is the only way to train a conifer for growth length ......

    well .. anyway .. some much to learn ....

    good luck

    ken

  • scotjute Z8
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Do remember that Virginia Juniper foliage will be prickly for the first few years. Then afterwards it transitions to its soft phase.

  • wellspring
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    It happened again! Conifer people must be psychic or somethingI had been wondering whether anyone else would post and had read through some other threads here. This is what I wrote before returning and discovering that Ken beat me to it. And, Ken, I swear to you, I was contemplating the new post(s) along the lines of the touch and smell suggestions. And, yes, I sort of get the growing thing. I mean I get it in my head, but it's sort of harder to absorb it fully for the long-range planning process.

    Anyway, here's what I wrote

    Noticed the ACS website mentioned in a couple of threads here. Nice! The data base works well for me -- not always the case when flying blind. Now the problem is just being overwhelmed! Also, the descriptions are soooo brief. I thought MBG was bad. I suppose it leans on the old picture-is-worth-a-thousand-words thing.

    SoI'm thinking about 3 t. o. 'Degroot's Spire', a viburnum x juddii or v. x burkwoodii 'Mohawk', and then perhaps a mixed grouping of ornamental grass, itea virginica 'Little Henry, and an unknown low conifer instead of my little hedge idea. I'm thinking of a softer framing of that "corner" of this border rather than a straight line. It just goes against my better judgment to plant things in soldier rows even if the line-up is short.

    Thank you again, Coralbelle. It helps to hear what other's have done.

    Now I'm just wondering about the texture / feel of the thuja. The other conifer "situation" in my landscape is an arborvitae hedge that hugs our western foundation. It does a good job warming the house, but it's a bit on the prickly side when I'm following it as a guide.

    Wellspring

  • ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    there are forums for shrubs and perennials ....

    research Thuja orientalis `Morgan' for a smallish thuja .. i don't know about fragrance ...

    i mean they all smell wondrous if you remove a piece and crush it.... but there are ones that only need a sweep across the foliage for smell ...

    try to get de groots that vary in size for a triangular planting ....

    i have a mohawk .... it has taken a lot of pruning to shape it into my preconceived notions .... but a nice plant.. and incrediable stink .. lol ... though for a very short time depending on the heat of the moment when blooming ...

    look into Daphne for some of the best fragrance ..... you may have to layer the bloom times of various aromas.. or you will end up with one week of riotous stink.. and nothing the rest of the year ...

    and think about butterfly bush [i have no latin name] for later summer fragrance ...

    ken

  • coralbelle
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    HI Wellspring,
    Just a few more quick comments from me. You've already had lots of good input. But I noticed you mentioned Picea abies 'Nidiformis' and I feel compelled to share my experience with this rather drab and uninspiring shrub. It sounds to me like you are interested in the unusual, the interesting or striking conifers. Bird's nest spruce is not one of them- it's a good filler plant when you need some 4 season green, but it is unexceptional.
    Ken mentioned Daphne and I want to put in a good word for 'Carol Mackie' Daphne. The sweet scent in spring perfumes the whole neighbourhood. Mine bloom for a second time in mid-summer, though not as profusely. And the year-round variegated foliage is attractive enough to recommend it. There's my 2 cents worth

  • wellspring
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Thank you, Ken. Thoughtful suggestions.

    Do I detect an attempt to lure me with another thuja? The one you mentioned - "Soft feathery fans of lime green/gold that turn a bright orange/gold in winter" (ACS data base) - Is that the one? Sounds gorgeous! Wish I could see the pics.

    Earlier today I found and read the 5 Conifers A Newby Must Have In Zone 5 thread. In fact I made it into a list. Great technique for catching conifer newbies! But'Degroot's Spire' wasn't there. I do like your idea of trying to get different heights if I go with these. I would never have thought of that.

    And, yep, I already use a lot of smellies. My daylilies -- only very fragrants get a spot. Hostas -- almost all mine are fragrant types. Lavanders, thymes, phlox, lilies, bulbs that are fragrantallyssum as a filler everywhere, sweet peas, nicotiana, honeysuckle, mints, other brushables both annual & perennial. Clethra, fothergilla, Calycanthus floridus, sambucus, lilac

    I suppose I'm going to have to get very intentional on my nursery rounds this year and scratch 'n' sniff all the conifers.

    Wellspring

  • wellspring
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    LOL

    I didn't notice your post Coralbelle until after mine.

    Thanks for the head's up on the bird's nest spruce. That's extremely helpful. Since I choose very carefully, any info or clarification I can get ahead of time is treasured.

    As to daphne, I'm chicken about the mysterious habit they apparently have of sudden death syndrome. I'm still building my shrub inventory and so haven't yet been too tempted.

    Did you get your Spires all approx the same height or variable? Any particular plant, conifer or otherwise, that you like with them?

    Wellspring

  • coralbelle
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Hi Wellspring,
    Since you asked.....
    My Spires are all the same height, but I like that suggestion of having different heights. You can tell who the experienced folks are!
    I have several little vignettes with the Degroot's spires... One is 3 spires with clumps of 'Karl Foerster' feather reed grass and masses of purple heucheras. This is lovely and drought tolerant.
    The second is again a trio of spires with a variegated euonymus ('Sure spot'). Now normally I don't like euonymus very much but I had a small space by the side of the deck that needed something very low maintenance and plants that would work hard year-round. That combination is visually pleasing - just enough yellow accent but not overdone, and nice contrast of foliage texture - and it looks good from January to December.
    The third is again a trio of Spires with three Chamaecyparis pisifera (I forget the name - variegated yellow but very subtle) and a sweep of Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola.' This is a much larger vignette at the front of the house and I love it.
    I realize I'm in a rut of using the spires in groups of 3, but 5 would be too many and one is kinda lonely, don't you think?
    I think I may have come on kinda heavy about the Degroot's spires - they are not a spectacular plant but they are quite lovely. I feel good every time I look at them for their pleasing slender form and their dark green curly foliage. I also appreciate their undemanding nature.
    As for Daphne, mine are now 5 years old (of course I have 3) and healthy as can be despite neglect. So, I can't comment on the sudden death scenario.
    I have a few other favourites, including Pinus strobus 'Nana' which we have nicknamed the 'Hedgehog' for its soft yet spiky appearance. I also have a Abies koreana 'Horstman's Silberlocke' which I am very fond of for the silver underside of the needles.
    That's enough blather for now!
    Keep us posted about your decisions.
    Coralbelle

  • conifers
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Hi Wellspring,

    Scratch 'Grey Owl' Juniper and 'Nidiformis' spruce. There's a lot more out there believe me.

    Your 'Acrocona' addiction of red cones could be accomplished with a very slow growing "witches' broom" from this cultivar which is aptly named 'Pusch' or 'Acrocona Pusch'. It's a 2-3 inch per year grower I believe but it carries along the same brilliant red cones, just smaller.

    I'll have to say that a lot of us here are big fans of 'De Groot's' Thuja. It does have a unique foliage and of course that tight habit. You really couldn't go wrong with these.

    Like your 'Juddi'/'Carliesi' Viburnum fragrance selection and the above recommendation of a 'Carol Mackie' Daphne, I'd like to suggest a different Daphne but only because it rivals in beauty but blooms much, much more. You should seriously consider a Daphne 'Summer Ice' -- fully hardy and blooms ALL SUMMER! There's a lot of love in this shrub.

    To get back to conifers your assumption about Pinus densiflora 'Low Glow' is right on the money. IT'S STRIKING!

    I also think a great burst of winter yellow would add more depth to your planting. Currently, there isn't a better gold than Pinus contorta var. latifolia 'Chief Joseph'. It's a normally green Pine 3 of 4 seasons but not in winter. In winter it sharpens to brighter than gold and glowing golden. It's an incredible small tree.

    You could also consider Picea abies 'Will's Zwerg' or it may be listed as Picea abies 'Will's Zwergform'. A shiny emerald green small or slower-growing tree. It's a good one. Sure being a spruce it's gonna have sharp needles. So who cares.

    I'd add in your flow at least one element of upright and weeping. You could add a weeper that's friendly to the touch such as Abies balsamea 'Weeping Larry' -- it's exceptional.

    Or a sharp-needled plant but powder blue, Picea engelmanni 'Bush's Lace'. One of my all time favorites...

    Try a few TSUGA's (Hemlock) - 'Gentsch's White' is affordable and a beauty, plus being soft. White-tipped and arching foliage in a globe form. A beauty.

    Make it look unusual! That's the plan right.

    Later gal,

    Dax

  • wellspring
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Wow! What a treatI can't figure out how to update my member page with an e-mail, so that it can tell me when people add to a thread. Just realized a few minutes ago that Coralbelle and Dax had posted.

    Beautiful pictures are starting to form in my head. If I'm not real careful, I'll be throwing caution to the wind and going on a mail-order binge despite my best-laid plan to try to go local and do a trip to St. Louis area for more possibilities.

    Coralbelle- For me your several vignettes with 'De Groots' are a bonanza of ideas. SShhhhDon't tell Ken, but I'm awfully fond of fragrant hostas. Might have to tuck one or two in the shadier corner of this border. If Ken finds out, he might start tempting me with 'Stained Glass' or 'Diana Remembered', which I don't have yet. That would just add to the temptation you guys are giving me!

    "The third is again a trio of Spires with three Chamaecyparis pisifera (I forget the name - variegated yellow but very subtle) and a sweep of Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola.' This is a much larger vignette at the front of the house and I love it."

    Is this your grouping that's in the driveway border?

    Dax- "Make it look unusual! That's the plan right." You got it! And that's my weak point in terms of trying to resist the temptationsIt isn't clear to me yet how hard it will be to move from the notes and mental view into actual conifers found and planted in a reasonably artful way.

    'Pusch' / 'Acrocona Pusch' -- Definitely a mail-order catch, right? But I do have a thing for red cones!

    'De Groot's' Thuja -- This is one I'm hoping to find in St. Louis. Sounds like MBG likes it, too, but I still need to check their "Locate this plant" link. Where did you guys find yours?

    Okay, okay, on the Daphne. Maybe it's time to try one. Now, where am I putting it?

    Yesterday, I spent a little time at the ACS website, and I checked out all the Abies balsamea cultivars, thinking that these are pretty fragrant? Is that right? I think I noticed 'Weeping Larry', but I don't remember why. What's his growth rate likely to be?

    "Chief Joseph' sounds stunning. I think, however, you are trying to lure me into planting the whole border of my drive down to and into the hell strip. Why not, I say? Well, Hubby has to be slowly coaxed into these things, too! But maybe the Chief needs to be on my Must Have Some Day list.

    In my mind's eye I understand that the sharper breeds would add a hint of somethingcleannessrefinement? but for now I can resist the sharper needled forms. There's just too much I don't have.

    Now your hemlock suggestionwell, I just may have to have one of those. You called her a beautytwice. 'Gentsch's White' -- "soft. White-tipped and arching foliage in a globe form. A beauty." Sounds like she also needs to be on my "soft" list.

    Thanks again, guys. I'm wondering which I'll be able to track down. May have to give my two favorite local nurseries a call. They could "special order" for me and that might at least secure one or two of my choices or the 3 thujas that I'm still thinking might be a good start. You see, I have this gift card from Christmas

    And, yes, I'll keep you updated on where I go with this.

    Wellspring

Sponsored
Ed Ball Landscape Architecture
Average rating: 4.8 out of 5 stars30 Reviews
Exquisite Landscape Architecture & Design - “Best of Houzz" Winner