SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
Houzz Logo Print
shari1332

Summer pics 3

shari1332
14 years ago

The scroll bar was getting tiny again. Some fantastic pics since I last posted.

Vitex agnus-castus is beginning to open

{{gwi:579675}}

Canna 'Panache'

{{gwi:579676}}

{{gwi:579677}}

Here is a link that might be useful: pics

Comments (70)

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Karen is your Mirabilis longiflora hardy here?

    Do you have the white-bracted sedge in a pot, or is it growing in a dry location?

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I wanted to add that I have really enjoyed seeing everyone's gardens -- they are all so different. It's wonderful and interesting.

  • Related Discussions

    Siloam Dean's Double, first blooms this summer, 3!

    Q

    Comments (5)
    Jessica, I never bought it, it is my name...but yeah, that's why I'm definitely partial to it I guess. :) I worked in her yard for 7 summers, and believe me wasn't easy work. but I learned a lot! just now getting the time to do something with the few I got to keep over the years...which means more work and making more room for dls. ha.
    ...See More

    1st day of 'Summer' pics

    Q

    Comments (5)
    Yeh I have probably over 100 potted plants this year. Im still not sure if I will let the big yuccas die, but if I do sometimes I take off the heads and root them. They root really easily. The yuccas came from Home Depot and the tall one was 30 dollars and the small one 20 something so they werent too expensive for their size. I wish I could take all my plants in, but I only have room for the more expensive ones, or the harder to find ones. The good thing about cannas and elephant ears though is they dont take up any room when you store the bulbs.
    ...See More

    August 2010 pics of the yard (and comparisons from early summer)

    Q

    Comments (20)
    Thanks Chris! I wish I had a greenhouse, but I dont really have a place where it would look good and get the benifits of the sun. I usually just put the plants around the house with the tallest palms going by the tallest ceiling . Last year all the plants barely had a place to go and this year I have a LOT more so Im starting to get a little worried. I think Im going to partially convert a room into a greenhouse since it has nice south facing windows and is rarely used. But one day I would really love to put all these plants in a greenhouse! Until then my house becomes a jungle with all the plants are fighting for their lives until spring finally comes! I think I am going to look up about greenhouses and maybe see where one can go. I can dream :) And thanks for the tip about the Fireball bromeliad. Originally when I took them out in late march, they were in full sun, but when the tree grew leaves for the summer, It got a lot more shade. I think next year Im going to look for a place with more sun and maybe if I get enough pups, I will have a few more plants too! And you got my ending signature just right! Sometimes I dont even notice Im writing it, lol.... Good luck! -Alex
    ...See More

    End of summer pics

    Q

    Comments (6)
    Southern il boy, I've come to learn after my visit with Boca Joe that my bananas may be Saba bananas. Ive cut them down to about 2 1/2 feet tall and dug them up. I'm going to store the psuedostems in perlite and peatmoss in large pots in my unheated storage room. Thats the best chancce they have for survival. They look alot like musa basjoo but Joe and I are just not sure. I'll be doing the same with my Dwarf Cavendish and all the pups from the larger bananas. Cross your fingers. The few palms and other plants; pineapple,succulents, crouton, cordyline(red sensation), ficus, lemon seedlings, will spend their winter in my SE living room. I also might try some shop lights for supplemental lighting. I'm sure pretty much everything will come through ok. Thanks for the comments guys.
    ...See More
  • transplanted2scin07
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Here's a daylight shot of 'Lime Frost' Daylily and an altered photo of 'Bama Bound'
    {{gwi:579747}} {{gwi:579748}}

    Single Hollyhock started from seed earlier this year
    {{gwi:579749}}

    The very pretty Rudbeckia "Prairie Sun"
    {{gwi:579750}} {{gwi:579751}}
    Phlox paniculata "David"
    {{gwi:579752}}
    A creepy little spider hides in a pink Zinnia
    {{gwi:579753}}

  • karen__w z7 NC
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Alicia, I haven't tried the mirabilis outside yet, but now that I have a few seedlings I'll try leaving some planted out. I've read of them being hardy in zone 7, but thus far I've just stuck the tuber on a shelf in the garage until spring. I also grow Mirabilis polonii, which tolerated the same winter care this past year. The sedge is in a pot set into a dish of water with the other bog plants. I've tried it out in my garden but it was too dry.

  • tropicalfreak
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Curious if your Butterfly bush comes back every year? This would be for a zone 6b garden. Thanks..Tropicalfreak

  • tamelask
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Karen is that another kind of cyclamen that's hardy here? And, obviously blooms now. Where did you find that? I have one coum, and a bunch of hederifoliums, but haven't seen that one before. You have such a range of different stuff. The 2 that smell like grape juice i've added to the list of stuff i need to get for my fragrant garden at the fair this year.

  • shari1332
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Alicia- Potter's Purple is georgeous. I can't imagine having one that big with my buddleia track record. Lemon Berry Frost is large enough to divide so I'll have to keep you in mind when I plant it.

    Karen, I love the silphium and the eryngium. How do you overwinter the container bog plants? I'd love to try that.

    transplanted- check out H. 'Royal Celebration' and see what you think. I've heard good things about it.

    I finally planted my half barrel today on my typical schedule of one month later than I thought,lol.

    {{gwi:579754}}

    Spider Miracle

    {{gwi:579755}}

    This bloom stalk on Crinum 'Ellen Bosanquet' appeared seemingly overnight. It's still in the small sized Plant Delights pot.

    {{gwi:579757}}
    I also planted a couple of plants out in the garden ahead of this rain so I'm feeling like it's been a good weekend

    Here is a link that might be useful: pics today

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Lavender Deal, Anchors Aweigh and Lillian Kathleen are just lovely. I like Loch Ness Monster and Emmaus too. How many of your daylilies rebloom?

  • tamelask
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Alicia, just fyi, i saw 'indian giver' at the farmer's market the other day. It's so pretty in person! My jaw dropped & i was sorely tempted but behaved.

    Do you find claire grace to be a shorter monarda? Because i think that's the one i have that carla gave me that she didn't know the name of. The color is a dead ringer. Mine and Carla's both get about 3' instead of the typical 4-5'+ of regular monardas.

  • karen__w z7 NC
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    All my bee balms are short. It's a reflection of their unhappiness with my dry soil. I've really got to find another place for them.

    Tammy, the cyclamen is C. purpurascens. They had a ton of different species at Pine Knot Farms Hellebore Days this spring so I decided this would be the year I get to know cyclamen. This one is a summer bloomer and should remain evergreen if I don't let it dry out. I've got it in a pot where it will get watered regularly through the summer, rather than out in the garden with the species that like a dry period. It's one of the hardiest cyclamen.

    Too bad my Mirabilis seedlings are still so small. They probably won't be blooming size by the time the fair comes around, but I'll keep an eye on them.

  • shari1332
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Alicia, of those that you listed only Nessie is not listed as a rebloomer. Here's a link to Tinker's Database which is the best IMO for looking up stats on individual cultivars. Even then you have to take what's listed with a grain of salt because each plants performance will vary depending on growing conditions and hardiness zones. The Stout Medal winners usually perform well just about everywhere.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Tinkers Database

  • amyflora
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Brillantaisia is wild!! Karen, could you tell us more about it. You have a stunning array of plants. Do you work in the industry? I ask because that has been a great way for me to be introduced to so many plants. Thanks.

  • tamelask
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Thanks, Karen for the info! I had no idea pineknot did cyclamen, too! I really will have to get up there one of these years. I love edgy hellebores and have been drooling over the thought of heading up. Their open house falls on or near my bday most every year so i'll just have to ask for that one year. :)
    I actually meant i'd look for the 4 o'clock & salvia at bb's, but if you have one for swap, so much the better. They don't get to blooming size in a season like the common 4 oclocks? I may ask ed (a good friend) if he has any blooming size to sell since i believe he grows that one. Good info to know about the beebalms, too.

    For you daylily nuts, do you know of any purple and/or peach or pale peach daylilies that will be blooming come around october? Do any of the rebloomers bloom then? If not, no big deal, but i do love their form & thought i'd ask. Is Indian giver a rebloomer?

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Tammy Claire Grace is shorter than Raspberry Wine.

    Shari thank you for the database link.

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Marie Pavie
    {{gwi:579758}}

    Zinnia Violet Queen
    {{gwi:579759}}

    A new one for me -- Lady Hillingdon
    {{gwi:579760}}

    {{gwi:579761}}

    {{gwi:579762}}

    {{gwi:579763}}

    More Buddleia Potter's Purple
    {{gwi:579764}}

    {{gwi:579765}}

    {{gwi:579766}}

    {{gwi:579767}}

    Bed between the house and the driveway is starting to shape up.
    {{gwi:579768}}

    {{gwi:579769}}

    Mockorange and Phlox paniculata Robert Poore
    {{gwi:579770}}

    {{gwi:579771}}

    {{gwi:579772}}

    {{gwi:579773}}

    This phlox sort of looks like a raging pink Pippi Longstocking.
    {{gwi:579774}}

    Echinaea, Mexican Feather Grass and Blue Love Grass
    {{gwi:579775}}

    Hyperion and Blue Love Grass again. No wonder this daylily has stood the test of time. It's fragrant and beautiful.
    {{gwi:579776}}

    Big perennial bed
    {{gwi:579777}}

    Picture of bed by neighbor's pasture taken from big perennial bed. I have a lot of Panicum at the back of the bed, both regular-sized and Cloud Nine, so if the neighbors go crazy with the Round-Up again hopefully the grasses will catch most of it. Lots of Bidens too until I can get more shrubs in there.
    {{gwi:579778}}

  • karen__w z7 NC
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Tammy, I got the Mirabilis longiflora at the Duke Gardens plant sale a few years ago. The seedlings may flower the first year but don't seem to put on much of show at that age, at least not where they land in my garden. I've got one that's getting to be a decent size, but it's nestled up too close to an amorphophallus to be able to dig it out without major excavation. The cyclamen that Pine Knot sells came from John Lonsdale at Edgewood Gardens. They've only had them at the Hellebore Days the past few years, but this spring the selection was tremendous. He also sells them via his website.

    Amy, Brillantaisia is an African native, related to Acanthus. It's not hardy here but easy to overwinter in the garage and ridiculously easy to grow from cuttings. I brought a few to the swap this past spring. It has big stems and coarse foliage, and gets very tall, so it makes a dramatic impact in a border or a pot. I've never been in the horticulture or nursery trade in any way, but I'll try anything and because I'm originally from Flordia I like all those strange, tender tropical and subtropical plants. I'm also perversely attracted to things I've never heard of, especially if I can't pronounce or spell the name. Basically I'm not a very discriminating gardener, so the screamingly loud red geranium from Kroger sits on the wall right next to the Bombax ellipticum, Hemizygia, and Perrierastrum, and is equally admired. A few weeks ago my husband asked if we could sell plants to help pay for/write off the greenhouse I'm planning. I'm not sure there aren't ulterior motives, ie cleaning out my 'stash' in front of the garage. I should bring him to a swap so he can get a broader perspective.

    Alicia, do you grow Rudbeckia maxima? The foliage would look great in there in the big perennial bed. If you don't have any, I can bring you a couple of seedlings to the next swap. Love those zinnias, btw. They're one of those flowers that always gives me a lift.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Edgewood Gardens cyclamen

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Karen that would be great. I think it would look good near the Panicum Cloud Nine and Buddliea and roses and swamp sunflowers. It's kind of funny though, that's the only flower I've ever heard my husband say he hated. But it was kind of growing by itself at the JC Raulston Arboretum.

    I'm in the process of adding many baptisias and shrubs to the big perennial bed this year -- or I should say I buried the pots with gravel and added Baptisia seed but will probably end up putting in Baptisia seedlings that I have growing on the front porch. I've put in a couple additional ARE swamp roses, Hippolyte, Rosa virginiana, and a couple of rose seedlings -- any more than that and I won't be able to keep them watered. Although I'm happy with how the big perennial bed looks now -- I'd just like it to have more structure.

  • tamelask
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Thanks for that info & link Karen- much appreciated! I need to get at and plant the brillantasia you gave me in the spring in the fair plot so it can get some size on it. Maybe i'll/we'll get some things planted out there this weekend. You definitely need to bring hubby to the swap. I don't doubt you could sell stuff if you wanted, but we certainly enjoy your largess and great eclectic selection!

    Funny that your hubby didn't like the rudbeckia, Alicia, as that was one plant i wanted desperately for a long time- mainly for the structure and foliage rather than the bloom. The bloom reminds me of a giant ratibda. I don't know where the heck i'd put one and as a consequence have since moved it way down my wants list. It's still uber cool for those with the sun & space!

  • karen__w z7 NC
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Tammy, I kept one Brillantasia cutting in addition to my original plant -- the cutting is the one that's already in bloom, so hopefully yours will take off when you get it in the ground.

    Alicia, I just walked the Duke gardens for a work break and kept thinking about your big bed. How about a Cardoon or Musa lasiocarpa for structure? BTW, anybody who's loving these daylily pictures should try to get by there. They have a huge collection that's currently in full bloom and also well labeled.

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Actually I don't like Bananas for this climate -- except for the velvet banana at the Arboretum, lol -- and it wouldn't fit well in what is basically a pastoral landscape. Cardoon might work -- that's at the Arboretum too, right, the bright blue thistle?

    I've got a lot of plants in that bed that are going to get big, if we get enough rain -- Buddelia, roses, seashore mallow. My Joe Pye plants (probably E. dubium) never get very tall but that's OK because I think the gigantic Joe Pye are a bit much.

    In the bed by the neighbor's pasture, which is a couple of years old -- I've got a seedling (Jelena) witch hazel, a Buddleia, a disappointing straight species R. palustris, an ARE R. palustris scandens, three or four rugosa seedlings, and a whole lot more room to fill in that are currently occupied by Bidens. I love Bidens but I think they do best by themselves. They don't get all that tall -- max 6' -- but they get very dense. I'd like to add a Titi or fringe tree and more native azaleas. I've got a bunch of Joe Pye and swamp sunflower aster and seashore mallow in the ditch in front of the bed that were planted last year, but with the drought they're still kind of small. In a wet year they'll pick up.

    2 of my favorite tall sculptural plants are sugarcane plumegrass and swamp sunflower. Unfortunately the swamp sunflower often gets some sort of fungus that kills the leaves out to the tips. But they still flower enough to be worth having. Hibiscus coccineus too but I've moved mine to the pond in one of the floodway fields -- I couldn't stand it with the Joe Pye weed and the Rudbeckia fulgida.

  • karen__w z7 NC
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    One of my favorite Helianthus for a 'statement' is H. salicifolius (willow leaved). I can't remember where I first saw a photo, but I killed several before I finally got the real thing and got it planted where it would come back. I also love Dog Fennel, though I know most people consider it to be a weed. And although I pull the poke weed, I think it's a pretty dramatic thing when it's in fruit. I wish I had the soil moisture to make Hibiscus coccineus and the Joe Pye happy, but they'll just have to limp along as best they can up here on top of my hill.

  • shari1332
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    My Hibiscus coccineus died out a couple of years ago so I decided to try Hibiscus 'Red Flyer' and it has done well so far. It's been taller than H. coccineus ever was for me.

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    lol I can't stand dog fennel. I've got so much of it growing wild here. For that same reason I could never grow goldenrod in my garden, not even one of the small well-behaved ones. I probably have at least half a dozen species and while they're OK they're also somewhat rank and there's a lot of other things I like better. I just have so much of it.

    I've heard that H. salicifolia and angustifolia are often confused in the trade; I think Sunlight Gardens carries salicifolia and I've been thinking of ordering it from them to compare it to what I have. I have one tall Helianthus from Niche with long strappy leaves, and another I grew from seed from the NC Botanical Garden that has much narrower leaves. Both angustifolius? variations thereof?

    Shari I'm not surprised your Hibiscus coccineus gave up the ghost. Although it's not necessary, mine grew with their roots under water almost 365 days a year (well, they practically still do, just now they're at the edge of a pond instead of in a ditch).

  • karen__w z7 NC
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I first learned the name 'dog fennel' when a friend/gardening mentor raved about it and told me she had purchased some from a specialty nursery. Now I'll admit I love it, but at least I didn't put out cash for it. As for the rumor that Helianthus are confused in the trade, I can confirm that one first hand.

  • shari1332
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I take most of my pics first thing in the morning, usually before 7 am. Some of the daylilies aren't open yet so I have to go back for those. When I get home after 6 pm most have faded considerably. This one is still almost the same as when I left and easily recognizable from across the back yard.

    Tar and Feather

    {{gwi:579779}}

    Here is a link that might be useful: pics

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Those are my 2 favorite daylilies of yours yet Shari. Ada May Musick looks exactly like a watercolor painting.

  • dellare
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I finally took some pictures today. Everything is pretty parched but we did get a tiny bit of rain this weekend.

    {{gwi:579780}}{{gwi:579781}}

    Here is a link that might be useful: June 08

  • karen__w z7 NC
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I love your semp topiary/columns. Very cool. What's the medium in there that they're growing on?

  • tamelask
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Wow- Adele your gardens are beautiful! I'm amazed that they've come so far, given you're gardening in sand during these drought years! I have a couple ?'s for you. How did you make those cool rounded stepping and edging stones? I love the way you made a decorative pointed 'necklace' of them around that one bed. I'm guessing they're concrete- how many do you get out of a bag? Also, where'd you get the firey silene- at bb's? What was the dark foliage plant towards the beginning of the album? Love that sedum/semp topiary! Wow- i would love to do that!

    Shari that daylily tar and feather is just mouthwatering! I agree that ada may looks like it was water colored. Interesting blend on it.

    There's a ton of dog fennel (the eupatorium one)growing in the lot next to us where the neighbors don't keep it mowed. I like small amounts of it, but en-masse, it's just a mess. Alicia- i like joe pye, but i feel the same way. Just planted one last night in my dry dry backyard (thinking rain was imminent) and i hope it doesn't get too tall. It probably will simply because it's a bit shady back there. It's close to my very large altheas so it won't look out of place. I couldn't believe how dry the ground was just 1" down. We didn't get much rain out of this weekend and the storms went all around us last night, even though it thundered for hours. I was ready to cry. It's as though there's a giant umbrella over my house! :(

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Adele I know you've had a hard time with the sand, but all of your hard work must be paying off because the beds in your pics are lush and beautiful. You have a Jack Russell?! Mine, if she makes it, will be 20 in August. It's been an interesting 20 years. What is the tree in the first picture -- a fringe tree? I see you've got one of those glass globes -- I love those. Your use of art and hardscape in the garden is amazing. You have done a wonderful job with your garden. Where did you get your art pieces?

  • dellare
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Oh my, thanks for the encouraging words. I take so many pictures and then get so depressed looking at them. They all seem so sandy and dry (the opposite of lush). I don't ever have any visitors out here and the ones that do stop by are never very enthusiastic or encouraging about my gardens. They just kind of look and say nothing which kind of upsets me cause all that is here I did myself in three years time. There were no gardens or beds of any kind. I look at those old pictures and wonder what I was thinking. Anyhoooo

    The sedem columns were made with a topiary figure with compressed spagnum and dirt mixed together. This is there second year and they seem to be doing okay.

    The garden borders came from the fact that we have no rocks here in this sand. I am originally from Connecticut were there are rocks are every size from little to big everywhere you look. I needed borders and had little budget. I got the idea from the hypertufa forum and tweaked it to work with my needs. One 50 pound bag of cement mixed with aggregate makes about 23 of the round "rocks". I mix the cement with a bit of peatmoss and then water in my wheelbarrel and then fill the bottom of a cut off water jug and drop them where I want them. That really sandy barren spot on the side of my house where the little sedum beds are will eventually be filled in with the cement drops, a sort of makeshift patio don't yah know.

    The silene is from bb's as is most of everything else in my gardens and the dark foliage around it are dahlias (that bishop series that we have had for the past couple of years). Also there is a purple hypericum in there somewhere.

    Yes that's our "jack" in the picture. He always turns up here or there in my pictures cause he is always around me. What a sweetheart he is. He is about 10 years old now and loves the move from the city to the country. Is it the tree in back of the coneflower? That's a vitex and one of the first trees/shrubs I planted when we first moved in. Most of the garden art is from bb's too. Not all but most. The owners have been very generous with me and I keep an eye out for cement stuff that is cracked or has rebar showing, etc. and usually the owner will sell it to me for next to nothing. Some of the things like the silver yoga girls were gifts from friends.

    I've watched these posts all spring into summer with pen and paper jotting down names and ideas. Love seeing everyones gardens. Adele

  • tamelask
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Oh, Adele- how sad that no one gives you great feedback! You sure do deserve it- bask in your accomplishment!! We really really need to get these garden tours going again- i think everyone likes to hear kudos as well as great new ideas. Selfishly, I want to see everyone's gardens in person!!

    I meant to comment on your artwork and sculptures as well and forgot- they really add something special and show your personality. I loved the yoga girls. What a great gift! You really should post to that sculptures/art thread from this spring. I still need to post the shots i took of my friend's garden.

    Thanks for explaining about the concrete drops. Know what you mean about the lack of rocks bugging you. In PA we had plenty to choose from and i miss rocks. What aggregate do you use and which concrete mix? Some of them have aggregate in them already. Do you add in vermiculite or perlite or anything like that to make them more permeable and light? When you say water bottle- do you mean one of those big ones? Would anything round pretty much work, depending on the size you want? It's just the fact that you lift it off and it rounds as it drys that gives it that nice quality, then? I may steal your method for something for our plot this year.

  • trianglejohn
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Adele - the edges you've made are way cool!! I will probably steal the necklace/star patterning when I finally get around to edgeing mine! I love to play with concrete - heaven help us all if I ever start any of my tuffa projects.

    Your beds are very cottage-y which I love and I see there is still some room for more plants, at least in some of them. Mine are so full they're pushing each other over the edge.

    I've been taking fotos this spring but the plants I really want to show people are the photos that don't come out well - ding dang d@mmit! Someday I'll figure out where I want to park them and then I will share share share.

  • karen__w z7 NC
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Adele, I was looking at the sandy soil in your photos, which is what I grew up with in FL, and it got me thinking about all the things I can't grow in my clay. I'd say 'the grass is always greener' but in this case it's more like 'the soil is always better draining'.

    On the other hand, my sister lives in Flagstaff and she always trumps my complaints about soil when she starts talking about trying to garden in cinders.

  • DYH
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    It's great to come here each day and see all the summer pics. My garden is a bit slow to peak due to those days of 100+ degrees. The rain we got last night didn't even soak down more than 1 inch into the soil. I pulled up a weed and got dry soil. :-(

    So, right now, I've got a lot of foliage...and fawns!
    Cameron

    There are twins, but the other one is out of view:
    {{gwi:579782}}

    Bee balm blooming among the Japanese iris and amsonia foliage. There is a butterfly white ginger in there, but it will be August before it blooms. Buddleia 'Honeycomb' is the tall shrub. Is the monarda 'Claire Grace' or 'Blue Stocking'? Long lost tags!
    {{gwi:579783}}

    Miscanthus 'Little Zebra', amsonia foliage, illicium foliage:

    {{gwi:578057}}

    Salvia ulignosia (front) with B&B up the slope. I *had* yellow 'Harvest Moon' coneflowers in there last year to break up all those spires and separate the blues. However, they didn't come back. If you know of a TALL yellow, drought tolerant, deer proof plant that would work, let me know!

    {{gwi:579784}}

    Echinacea 'Sundown' continues to put on a show. The deep orange crocosmia echos the cone colors. Aslepias 'gay butterflies' in the background in yellow.

    {{gwi:233645}}

    Curly willow, buddleia 'pink delight' and a kousa dogwood (still small).
    {{gwi:579786}}

    A little of this, a little of that...sweet bay magnolia (left edge) with a few colocasia ears showing. Purple heuchera, buddliea...and a yellow brugmansia (overwintered in the ground) that will hopefully bloom again, but without those terrible drought conditions of last year.
    {{gwi:579787}}

    Winter Daphne in summer (to the left of the sweet bay magnoila). The daphne bloomed so profusely that I had to prune it to keep it from splitting. The sweet bay just finished blooming...wonderful fragrance! My favorite tree.

    {{gwi:579788}}

  • dellare
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    John, speaking of cement projects. I have these HUGE beach balls or exercise balls that I purchased on line cheap to cover with layers of concrete so that you end up with a huge hollow ball with the hole in the top or side (where ever you want it). I saw one in a magazine that was terracotta in color and they had theirs filled with water and I think a little water plant. I've been putting off starting them cause I am not quite sure how to execute it but eventually I'll get up enough nerve to try.

    Tammy I buy the 50 pound bags of concrete with aggregate already in. I add enough peat to change the color just a bit. The more peat you add the more pourous your rocks will turn out. You have to be careful though cause more peat also effects the strength of them. I've seen some big mushroom like creations that had enough peat in them that you are able to grow moss on them. The mixture I make is pretty thick. I wear gloves and fill the bottom of the water jug (the big ones with the handle) with my hands used as a scoop. When I plop the cement mixture down it is thick enough to shape. I've added hearts to some of the borders as well as silly faces, etc., just by sculpting them after plopping the cement on the ground. Adele

  • trianglejohn
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Adele - I also have a large rubber ball under the house that I intend to slather in 'crete. I saw how someone did it over on the Tuffa forum years ago. They did it in millions of very thin layers and the end product was very sturdy. I believe they used some sort of portland/sand blend and not the readymix stuff.

    My plan is to first cover the ball with a layer of paper mache (newspaper strips soaked in water and elmers glue) just so the concrete mix has something better to stick to and it hopefully won't drizzle off the ball. After the concrete cures I can just soak it and remove any paper that gets fused with it. I need them strong since I have a daily rain of tree limbs falling on the garden.

    Don't ever visit the Little & Lewis website (www.littleandlewis.com) otherwise you'll break open the piggy bank and race of to Home Depot and buy all the bags of Readymix they have and start playin in the mud!!

  • tamelask
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    The other website that has great tufa stuff is the sedumphotos.net site. Doing tufa on a big ball is a great idea! I should have done that for my teacup last year!! I was afraid a container of that size would be too hard to move. I sit on one of those balls as my office chair! :)

    Adele, i don't mean to be dense, but do you mean like milk jugs or the big water cooler type water bottles? Yeah, if i make some for here, i'd do more peat because i'd love them to get mossy. For the plot, not so much. Thanks for clarifying which mix.

  • dellare
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Yeh Tammy just regular gallon size milk jugs. I had a ton of them but they were water jugs since I don't really drink much milk left over from winter sowing one year and even with the slits in the bottom for drainage they worked fine since the mix I make is quite thick. Adele

  • shari1332
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Adele, it's amazing what you have done in such a short time. I love your cottage entrance and your homemade patio and garden art.

    Cameron, your echinaceas are to die for. I'd be too wary of voles to try them until the price comes down on them. And I'm really envious of your sweet bay. I don't dare plant one right now with the drought.

    I only have pm pics from yesterday. I played with my camera a bit yesterday and have to convert the am pics to upload. This is a noid that doesn't open until way into the day but looks great in the evenings.

    {{gwi:579789}}

    Here is a link that might be useful: pics

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Cameron I remember seeing a tall full Coreopsis or Helianthus at the NC Botanical Garden, in the section with all of the phlox -- can't remember the name, sorry -- that may be a good replacement for the yellow Echinacea.

    Shari the noid daylily is beautiful.

    The recent rain missed us too. Some things are starting to look stressed again.

    Babies on front porch (seedlings and divisions)
    {{gwi:579790}}

    {{gwi:579791}}

    I don't know what to do with the Canna Musifolia. Anybody want?

    Volunteer sunflower
    {{gwi:579792}}

    Four o' clock. I also have a salmon/ coral four o'clock that doesn't
    really fit in my garden. Anyone interested?
    {{gwi:579793}}

    {{gwi:579795}}

    {{gwi:579797}}

    Euphorbia corollata
    {{gwi:579799}}

    Bayse's Purple
    {{gwi:579801}}

  • trianglejohn
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Alicia - I'll trade some of my dianthus' for the salmon Mirabilis! The wildflower looking dianthus is still blooming so you could see what it looks like before you decide. You've already toured my yard so it's my turn to travel - I'm free Sunday afternoon/evening or some evening next week. I can bring an assortment of stuff and you can keep whatever you want (I'm in purge mode).

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Sure, Sunday afternoon sounds good to me. :) I'll dig that four o'clock tonight so that it gets a chance to recover.

  • trianglejohn
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Don't kill yourself over it. I still have a pot or two of the 'Broken Colors' seedlings that Brenda shared about 3 years ago - thats right! still in pots! waiting for a space in a flower bed. Someone I know has a large hedge of the salmon colored Four o'Clock that I admire everytime I visit. Since they grow other colors I'm afraid seeds won't bloom true so any shred of a root you can spare will be much appreciated.

    I'll send you an email to get directions or address so I can mapquest ya. In case Garden Web's links don't work you might want to email me at: johnbuettner@hotmail.com

  • shari1332
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Alicia, I'll trade you a Lavender Deal for the canna. I'll email you later. May be able to work out some more trades.

  • irislover_nc
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Hem. 'Hush Little Baby'
    {{gwi:579802}}


    Rudb. 'Goldilocks'
    {{gwi:579803}}


    Rudb. 'Cherokee Sunset'
    {{gwi:579804}}


    Hem. 'Royal Occasion'
    {{gwi:579805}}


    Driveway Bed
    {{gwi:579806}}


    Wintersown Hollyhock w/ aforementioned friend
    {{gwi:579807}}


    Wintersown Yvonne's Salvia(look how I got it to bloom sideways! LOL!)
    {{gwi:579809}}

    My gardens are in that sort of weird in-between phase where the spring-flowering stuff is setting seed(and looks awful) and the summer stuff is still coming on so they aren't able to distract me from looking at the drying seed pods!

    So I end up taking pics of the same plants...I suppose there are a few new ones in here.

    Stay cool people; gonna be a hot one today!

    Meredith

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Shari good deal!

    Meredith, beautiful daylilies and Rudbeckia. I love the two-tone Rudbeckias and the ones with mahogany colors; they stand out so much in the garden. Great pictures.

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Arbor for Climbing Devoniensis, which is currently about 6" high
    {{gwi:579811}}

    {{gwi:579813}}

    Hudson Valley. Huge fragrant flowers.
    {{gwi:579814}}

    {{gwi:579815}}

    {{gwi:579816}}

    {{gwi:579817}}

  • shari1332
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I love the Cherokee Sunset rudbeckia with the Russian Sage. Hudson Valley looks like my kind of daylily too.

    I'm pretty sure I've seen peak daylily bloom this week. I haven't been able to keep up with the daily pics.

    This plant didn't look like it could handle my garden at first but it's been no prima donna.

    Acalypha- Copperleaf Plant

    {{gwi:579818}}

    Crinum powellii 'Alba' first blooms ever for me on a bulb ordered from Brent and Becky's in spring of 2006.

    {{gwi:579819}}

    Teaser,lol.

    {{gwi:579821}}

    I haven't uploaded half of what I would like to but I'll do the link anyway.

    Here is a link that might be useful: pics

  • alicia7b
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Shari I really like that Bachman seedling. It's very elegant. Lotsa Dots too. I've never seen a picoteed daylily before that one.