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ptboise

2011 New Rose Plantings - Surprises and Disappointments

ptboise
11 years ago

I thoroughly enjoy this forum, and rarely post, but I thought I'd ask what roses that you planted this year have been surprises and, perhaps, disappointments. I added a couple of dozen roses this year, mostly - but not all - own root. Most performed as expected, but some deserve special comment. (I realize this is all about location - my roses mostly freeze to the ground each year, and don't start blooming heavily until July - just in time for the high desert dry heat. Picture sagebrush. And brown hills. Lots of brown. The last drop of rain was June.)

Surprises:

Jeannie LaJoie - love this rose. All three, in different locations, are just outstanding. Nothing miniature about this plant, and the blooms are in non-stop tight clusters.

Ramblin' Red - plopped two out at the entrance to the place, weekly watering, and they have been robust and constant flowering. Seemingly bulletproof, it continues to throw 4' shoots in its first year.

Rugosas - I don't know why I have not, over the years, tried these before. Hansa, Purple Pavement, Robusta. All just outstanding. And they look like they will have some pretty stunning hips this winter.

Carefree Delight - covered, non-stop, with blooms. Grows like a weed. Love it.

Cherry Parfait - a bit of a flyer, I got this locally on a recommendation. Wow. A blooming machine, large and healthy.

Lavender Dream - slow to start. Showed it a picture of Ingrid's. Wafted the shovel in its general direction. It has taken off. Love the color.

Distant Drums - it took awhile to absorb the coloring, but it has bloomed in short-cycle flushes all summer. An eye-catcher. 3-5 days before the blooms blow.

Mountain Mignonette - another flyer. From High Country Roses. Love it. Lavender-pink. Non-stop blooms.

Sweet Chariot - planted four. This rose lives up to its hype. Very, very impressed.

Livin' Easy - another one that lived up to its hype. Plant three of these together and all your guests will gravitate to them. I thought the color might be garish, but it really isn't. Baking sun - blooming machines.

Darlow's Enigma - going to like this one. Robust. Covered in blooms. Great to place in a distant corner where it can do its large, thorny thing.

Dublin Bay - very robust for a first year climber. Steady bloomer.

Reine des Violettes - I thought this would be one of those finicky plants, and I'm less disposed to finicky these days - but it has been disease free, robust, and tosses the occasional stunning blooms.

Silver Star - I once read on this forum "Lavender never fails to disappoint" - and I would generally concur. Except for this one. Another flyer. It is 3'x3', with non-stop stunning blooms that do not blow for days. Full sun. I'm more than a little impressed.

Cardinal Hume - I don't know why this rose isn't planted more. It has a horizontal form, non-stop gorgeous blooms, and is a great performer.

The Jury Is Out:

Sally Holmes - I've kept the one on the East side of the house with five hours of morning sun. The one on the West side was SP'd recently. Those large clusters of white blooms turned, within hours in the western exposure, to used kleenex at a flu clinic. Not a pretty site.

Rosarium Utersen - I've probably misspelled that, but it deserves it. I've coo'd to it in German, watered regularly, and smile as I pass by. To no avail. It sulks. Petulant. Uncaring.

Lavender Lassie - the one on the NE corner with six hours of sun is only OK. Sending out runners like its an ivy plant. The full-sun Lassie has had one bloom. And the plant doesn't seem to care. Not one little bit.

Anyway - what were your surprises and "jury is out" plantings this year?

Comments (36)

  • ken-n.ga.mts
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Almost everything new for me this year has done really well. Let Freedom Ring, Tineke, Chicago Peace, Peace, Gemini, Moonstone, Falling In Love, Remember Me, Sunstruck. All of these HT's have done better then I expected. Dark Night has been the really good surprise. After reading how picky it was on the west coast, I didn't know what to expect. I gave this rose afternoon shade and it has been a happy camper all summer. Bush habit and flower size reminds me of Black Magic and now that it has started to cool off a little the blooms fill my hand. And that deep burgandy color is very eye catching. Set against deep green foliage, this is a winner in my garden.

  • nanadollZ7 SWIdaho
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Hello ptBoise,
    I always read your posts with great interest since we share the same climate, though my micro climate seems to be extra warm. I've been pleasantly surprised with the nice consistency my new 2011 roses have shown in healthy growth and steady bloom, compared to some of the disappointments of 2010 and 2009. My favorite new rose is Ascot from Palatine. Its reddish purple, cup shaped blooms have stood the heat well, plus the whole plant just looks so darn healthy. It's a Tantau rose, and I like it better than the Kordes roses I have. The David Austin rose, Young Lycidas, is doing well, after having spent the whole summer in its nursery pot blooming it's head off. Normally, I don't go for a lot of the older American roses, but I've wanted Angel Face for years, and it hasn't been a picky princess at all. It looks healthy, and I love the ruffly blooms. Others doing well include Kordes' Party Dress, a florist rose. Not too many blooms, but it doesn't get a lot of sun. And reliable Memorial Day, in a not ideal location, is coming along nicely.
    I didn't get many new roses this year because I've run outa room. I'll figure out something, though, because I know I'll want more roses next year! Diane

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  • kentucky_rose zone 6
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Great post!

    Rose' - probably my best new this year; producer, short cycles, still has more healthy leaves than most of my other rosebushes, stems are sturdy, blooms are big and they last, and slight fragrance

    Merlot - interesting bloom, stems seem weak, gets BS (I spray)

    Crescendo - love the bloom

    Always and Forever - nice big red

    Sugar Moon - bareroot slow to grow, getting established, small bloom matches small bush, bloom was nice white and had a wonderful fragrance, don't know if the problem was my bareroot from Rosemania

    Ghostzapper - growing and blooming, nice pink/white

    Daddy Frank - growing, doesn't hold as well as Memphis King

    Tabasco Cat - growing, orange blooms on half and white blooms on other half of plant

    Arcanum - not growing as well as the above and just 1 or 2 bloom cycles,so far

    Be My Baby - beautiful fushsia pink that holds it's color in the heat, spidermites love it

    Randy Scott - on fort.,beautiful form with tall center, exhibition rose that produces and looks great in the garden, too

    Summer Love - on fort., nice medium yellow

    Pat's Choice - on fort., beautiful orange that the sun washes out

    Affirm - on fort., love the shade of pink!

    Stainless Steel - on fort., plant slower to get going, but it's looking good now

    Joyfulness - on fort., love the bloom, some BS problems

    Tineke - got bareroot last of April (too late, it had broken dormancy and we had some extreme heat), and plant is struggling, the blooms were amazing, don't know if it'll make it through the winter

    I just hope all the roses make it through the winter O.K., especially the fort.

  • ptboise
    Original Author
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Diane - I'm with you - Angel Face is one of my favorites. Just does great here, and with a couple near the front door all the guests comment on the fragrance. Your reference to Kordes reminds me that I'm a bit behind the times - I didn't discover them until a couple of years ago. Also - even though you and I are within a mile of each other, I swear I'm 5-10 degrees colder on many mornings. You're on the hill and I'm in this little draw on Dry Creek. So, first hard frost (just ask my grapes) will be as always the first week of October. I think you get an extra two weeks on me.
    Kentucky Rose - I've drooled over Stainless Steel for a long time, just haven't taken the plunge. Keep us posted.
    Ken - Gemini is another I've always wanted to try.

  • TNY78
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Well this is my third year growing roses and I've added close to 100 this year (yes, seriously!)...here are some of the standouts for me...both good and bad:

    Good: (low disease, lots of blooms on all of these)
    Freckles
    Distant Drums
    Cinco de Mayo
    Glamis Castle
    Alfred de Dalmas
    Rouge Royale
    Golden Princess
    Darlows Enigma
    Easy Does It
    Balinda's Dream

    The Bad (lots of disease, blooms not what I'd expect)
    April in Paris
    Bellaroma (can't keep its foliage at all!!!)
    Love (I didn't think it was going to make it...but we'll see)
    Pumpkin Patch & Strawberry Hill (I can't get any new growth)
    Eureka (oh the BS!!!!!)
    Julia Child (very surprising to me, but she's not doing well...maybe she just needs a good rest over the winter and will take off in the spring???)
    Jeri Jennings (another that I thought would do well but is having BS issues)

    There's a lot more that fall in the middle :)

  • flaurabunda
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Daddy Frank--was as small as a teacup when it arrived. It has now sprawled to 4 feet wide and 2 feet tall, and it keeps throwing out new canes. BIG new canes for a mini, wow! My blooms are holding up very well outside, but they seem to hate being in the vase.

    Perfect Moment--can't find anything wrong with this rose at all except lack of fragrance. It's a monster. First time I've ever seen one of my newer roses have 25+ blooms in a flush. Blooms are just perfect, pinpoint centers with a boatload of color.

    St. Patrick--wow, does it ever have an ugly bloom? I don't think so. Every single one looks perfect and they stay on the bush for nearly 2 weeks. I've never had blooms that stick around for that long that have even a whiff of fragrance, but this one does.

    Paradise Found--Holy cow! Every time it blooms I just stand there and stare at it in amazement. Very, very beautiful.

    Koko Loco--I thought it was an HT when I ordered it, but I see now that most descriptions categorize it as Floribunda. It is indeed starting to produce blooms and grow like a Flori and it's totally a 'wow' rose.

    Dark Night--slow to take off, but it's ramping up right now. It looks more velvety than Taboo, which is right next to it in my garden. Can't say enough good things about how Dark Night looks. It's simply striking.

    Not so good so far....

    Jude the Obscure--thinks it's a non-flowering shrub at this point. Planted in March and I've had THREE blooms. It's puny, but I've heard it may take a season or two for it to realize that it's a rose bush.

    Black Jade--puny & sickly looking, but it's probably my fault. I think someone or something may have stepped on it a couple of times in it's infancy.

    About Face--foliage and canes are growing nicely, but very few blooms so far and those that just opened were all singles. I think it hates extreme heat, which we had a lot of lately.

  • strawchicago z5
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    ptboise, great thread. Here's the scoop in zone 5a, one hour west of Chicago. I plant ten Austins this year, here are my surprises:

    1) Wise Portia - big performer, I love the mauve color and fragrance. It's been casted as blackspot-prone by many sources: David Austin, Chicago Bonatical Study, and Bonica's Rose Enclyclopedia. I have zero blackspot, although I plant this in 4-5 hours of evening sun.

    2) Golden Celebration - no blackspot, in partial shade/evening sun.

    3) Radio Times - the fragrance beats them all. Although this is OUT of Austin's catalog due to disease issue, I have no problems.

    Conclusion: just because a variety is disease-prone doesn't mean it won't do well in your garden.

    Disappointments: Christopher Marlow: smells good at first, the color fades as cut-flower, great bush and disease-free nevertheless. Mary Rose, got pricked by its thorn, doesn't make good cut flower, but still a great bush. William-Shakespeare: the blossom is smaller than I expect, the scent is unstable, I still hunting for a good fragrant red rose for zone 4/5.

  • seil zone 6b MI
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I only planted 4 new ones this spring, Crimson Bouquet, Dick Clark, Elle and Strike it Rich. The first three have done great for their first season. All broke dormancy and have grown well and bloomed several times. Now I just have to see how they winter. Strike it Rich never broke dormancy and I ended up tossing it. That was very disappointing.

  • hoovb zone 9 sunset 23
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I would give Rosarium Utersen more time. That one is worth the wait. Climbers always take longer to establish. Also 'Jude The Obscure' didn't do much here for years, now it's magnificent. Must have some Noisette in it?

    I got 5 more 'Easy Does It', and they are even better than the first one. Two 'Liv Tyler/Comtesse de Provence' and the plants are no better than the one that died. No vigor as yet. Too bad, such a lovely fragrant flower.

    'Tangerine Streams' is kind of meh. It got some rust right away, with flowers nearly identical to 'Pure Poetry', but 'Pure Poetry' has much better rust resistance.

    Also 'Young Lycidas' which is okay, not bad, but it's not going to be as compact as I'd hoped. The octopus arms are appearing.

  • ken-n.ga.mts
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Kentucky Rose-----Do yourself a favor. I've grown Arcanum for a bunch of years. This is one of those roses that needs to have it's roots packed in pretty good. If you have it planted in the garden, it won't grow well. I had mine in a 3 gal pot for almost 3 yrs. Then moved it into a 5 gal. pot. It's a happy camper. The way I found out about this trick is because I've grown Starina for a long time and it was the same way.

  • strawchicago z5
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Laura: I was thinking about Jude the Obscure for next year, but upon checking previous forums - J. the O. likes hot, dry climate like California better - so does Sharifa Asma. I don't have the full sun for these two, so I'll go back to older Austins that do well in rainy, colder climate. Someone in zone 4/5 reported Pegasus as doing well. Others report that own root roses bloom more, and are less likely to have octopus arms.

  • Merilia
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    How odd... I planted 3 Jude the Obscure bushes in April of this year, and have gotten loads of flowers throughout our cool "summer" so far. In fact after the 1st flush it went from producing mostly single blooms to large sprays of up to 8 of the pretty cup shaped blooms. When you figure in the yummy grapefruit smell I'm just adoring this rose.

  • strawchicago z5
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Merilia: it's good to know how much sun your Jude the Obscure get. I'm 1 hour west of Chicago, the rose park here had Jude the Obscure in full June sun, with only one bloom per stick. He looked like little dumplings on skinny sticks.

    This April I was wearing a winter jacket, now I'm wearing my fall jacket, we get down to -30 degree windshield factor in the winter. Six of my Austins get only 3 to 4 hours sun as we move into fall.

    Somoeone in the past forum reported Crown Princess Magareta still blooms with only 2 hours of sun, it's pretty hardy as well - I'll plant that next year.

  • kentucky_rose zone 6
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Ken - Thanks for the advice, but I don't do good with pots. Can I put it in a pot and plant the pot?

  • the_bustopher z6 MO
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    The two of my newest plants I could comment on are the two floribundas Cinco de Mayo and Light My Fire. I wondered about both of these varieties at first for various reasons, but I questioned whether either of them would do very well. The first Light My Fire I saw was in the garden center where it had a bunch of flowers having split centers which is a no-no for showability purposes. The Cinco de Mayos I saw in the AARS test bed I was evaluating did not look all that impressive. I bought my first Light My Fire last year, took it home, and gave it some care. I was royally rewarded. This year I bought two more, and all of them flowered well through the 100+ temperatures heat wave we had although the flowers did fry. It kept going.

    I wound up with two Cinco de Mayos. One was for doing the AARS garden evaluations, and the other one was paired up with a Heaven On Earth that I got as a pair from Costco. It had one foot in the grave and the other one on a banana peel when I got it, but amazingly, it came around. Both of them flowered quite well and fairly constantly all summer once they got going. The color is unusual, but that is okay. I like it. I was quite surprised and happy about them doing so well overall.

    My disappointments are three more of my plants appearing to have rose rosette. I don't know if they can be saved or not, but I'm giving it a shot. I have been cutting off and burning the affected parts. I have also been trying some spraying to drown the mites, if possible. Death by drowning is just as dead as death by miticide. I caught a budworm in the act of eating a bud. It was dead in seconds with my homemade concoction. That was the last meal for it. Wish me luck.

  • ken-n.ga.mts
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Kentucky Rose----YES!!! That's what I did. With mulch over it no one can tell. This way you can control the water and food. By the way, it likes fish emul.

  • Merilia
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Strawberry Hill: My JtOs are in full sun, but I live in a suburb of Seattle that's an even cooler microclimate, so heat is something my roses don't really experience. I can count the number of times it's reached the mid-80s this year on one hand.

    Here's a terrible photo because my camera insisted on using flash, but at least you can see what I was talking about. I've gotten a few stems like this where it's just gone nuts with blooms.

    Here is a link that might be useful: {{gwi:331038}}

  • milleruszk
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    ptboise,

    I too planted Ramblin Red this year and I am very satisfied. It has grown up my trellis and is in constant bloom and disease free with no spraying. Next year it will be over the top on my trellis!

  • AMaji
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Don Juan, Sunsprite, Mirandi and Rio Samba were the biggest surprises. A lot of blooms and blooming often.

    Double Delight and Ingrid Bergman were the two laggards. The bushes are still small and the production is low.

    Renaissance Amelia was great while she was alive, but the Belgian beauty could not handle the South Louisiana heat and passed away. I enjoyed her company while she lasted.

  • strawchicago z5
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Merilia: Your pic. of Jude the Obscure is awesome, thanks. A better way to say is Jude the Obscure prefers temperate coastal climate, like England or your PNW, rather extreme inland climate like mine (scorching hot summer over 90's, -30 windshield factor in winter, May 30 as last day of frost).

    I love Jude the Obscure, but after seeing how weak and puny it is at the rose park (one flower per stem) - I don't think I have the right soil nor climate. I also learn to bypass Ambridge Rose since other forum members reported it as proned to chlorosis in alkaline soil.

    It's good to know the good surprises & disappointments and the climate and type of soil associated with them.

  • nastarana
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Successes so far:

    Rosarium Uetersen has not been out of bloom since arriving last spring. What it is not doing is growing very much, but I can't discipline myself to pinch off the buds.

    Duchess of Portland has lovely blooms, and in my climate seems much healthier than other Portlands.

    Karlsruh doesn't bloom as often as RU, but the flowers are spectacular.

    A Tantau floribunda called Pussta arrived in mid summer from Eurodesert, with mold acquired from languishing in a USPS warehouse for two weekends. It has sprouted and produced a bouquet of blooms shaped like small HTs. I don't know that I have ever seen so vigorous a rose, except for some of the noisettes and teas which I can't grow where I am now. The color is unusual, dk red doesn't truly describe a sort of reddish orangish smokey purplish dusky bright but dark red. The sort of color which great designers use for simple scarves and charge $50. per each.

    Mme Knorr, a Portland, didn't bloom very much, or grow, but is in a difficult location, and shall be moved next spring. The color is the prettiest bright medium pink, a modern color in an old rose.

    Another pair of Tantau floribundas, Cinnabar and Tamango, bloomed all summer. Tamango I also got this summer, and it lost no time in growing and flowering.

    Alba Meidilland has grown like a house afire, and not been out of bloom since May.

    My albas, which I thought I had lost to rabbits last fall all grew back and are now beginning to attain their customary size and stature. I am looking forward to flowers next spring. One of the highlights of my year is when the albas bloom.

    Another happy surprise was to find bumblebees crawling in and out of my roses. With honeybees in decline, I was thrilled to find that my rose obsession might be good for attracting native bees. The bumbles here are black and white, like little pandas.

    The only real disappointments were

    Cl. Rose Marie, which did survive the winter with cover, and produced some flowers last spring. So far, I am not at all impressed by the flowers, though the bush is both healthy and vigorous and is now putting out long flexible canes. Maybe next spring I will see better flowers.

    Martin Frobisher has not bloomed At All in two years. Rugosa hybrids are supposed to do well here!

  • nanadollZ7 SWIdaho
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Strawberryhill,
    I live in a scorching semi arid desert and have a Jude that is upwards of 10 feet tall and has bloomed all summer, during which it hasn't dropped below 90 degrees more than two days since the first week in July. It was 95 two days ago. I don't know what the secret to Jude is, but it isn't necessarily a coastal climate. But it does take about three years to get established.
    Speaking of bees and other wildlife going in and out of roses--a few days ago, I witnessed a delightful sight when a hummingbird sampled one of my new Ascot roses. I've never seen one of those little guys do that to any of my roses before. Diane

  • strawchicago z5
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Diane: thanks for the info. Blendguy (Robert) from England said that Jude the Obscure prefers it hot. I also hear contrasting experiences from CA. One thing I'm sure is that he likes full-sun, and David Austin's catalog putting him in partial shade is misleading.

    What type of soil you have for him to grow 10' tall? Alkaline heavy clay full of limestones like mine, or more acidic well-drained soil? I don't know if William Shakespeare likes full-sun or partial-shade? I keep moving him back and forth and he's still a runt.

  • strawchicago z5
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Diane: I found a previous discussion on Jude. Your soil is alkaline, and Jude grows best on Dr. Huey (prefers alkaline). So it has to do with the rootstock as well.

  • flaurabunda
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    My Jude is on multiflora, from Pickering, but I had read that I need to give it a couple of years before I expect anything from it. If it were my only rose I'd be disappointed, but based on the 3 blooms I've seen, I'm willing to be patient and give it the time it needs.

  • aimeekitty
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Ah,... while I'm close to SP'ing WS2K,... I willing to wait for Jude. It seems healthier than WS2K at least in my location... and when it does bloom, it's blooms are like my top 10 or even top 5 in my yard.. and the scent... ah!!

  • nanadollZ7 SWIdaho
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Strawberryhill,
    Yes, my soil is alkaline, but it does drain well. And Jude is on Dr Huey rootstock. I have quite a few roses on multiflora, some of which had growth problems. After a few minor changes to soil amendments, they are all doing well, and I'm really pleased with the changes. Sometimes, too, just the passage of time and maturing of the rose is all that's needed. Golden Celebration is a good example of that. It's another rose that took three years to come into its own. Diane

  • strawchicago z5
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I was surprised that my William Shakespeare (own-root) in Miracle-Gro potting soil shows iron deficiency (yellowish leaves and green veins). His shape is small, bushy and round. Michaelg reported the same iron and magnesium deficiency with his W.S. grafted on multiflora.

    However, picture of W.S. submitted by Aimee showed him having dark green leaves and octopus arms. Aimee: what rootstock is your William Shakepeare? I wonder if Dr. Huey rootstock gives a more vigorous growth, like Diane's 10 feet tall Jude, and perhaps more deep green leaves?

    All my 10 Austins are own-root, they are short like ground-creepers. The only octopus arms is Golden Celebration. If own root gives smaller, bushier plants with more blossoms, I'll put up with chlorosis and less deep green leaves.


  • aimeekitty
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    My WS certainly didn't have octopus arms... mine is so tiny!
    Perhaps you're thinking of the James Galway behind my WS?
    My WS:
    http://aimeemajor.com/images/temp2/william01.jpg
    WS with James Galway behind it for scale:
    http://aimeemajor.com/images/temp2/william02.jpg

    My WS is from David Austin (Dr Huey rootstock)

    I don't think that own root necessarily means = more blossoms, etc... There are some articles and studies done you could look up though if you wanted to know more? (google came up with these quickly):
    http://oldheirloomroses.com/Articles/Ownroot.htm
    http://paulzimmermanroses.com/?page_id=307

    I currently have (all are about the same age, about 2 years old) Most are growing a bit, but will probably take a while to get established and show more bloom and growth.
    I think the differences in mine at least might have more to do with individual spots in the garden and the vigorousness of the particular variety? But I really dont know.

    AUSTIN OWN ROOTS:
    Belle Story (started as 5 gallon, no growth)
    Carding Mill (started as 1 gallon, decent amount of blooming)
    Queen of Sweden (started as 1 gall, no blooming, possible rose mosiac)
    The Prince (started as a 1 gall, showing pretty strong growth, partial shade)
    Wild Eve (started 1 gall, in partial shade, fair amount of growth/good blooming)

    AUSTIN GRAFTED (Dr Huey)
    James Galway cl - vigorous, grew a lot, lots of blooms
    Jude the Obscure X 2 - growing a little, blooming acceptably
    Mortimer Sackler
    Sombrieul (not a DA, but from DA) also showing lots of blooms and strong growth.
    WS2K X 2 - pretty much no growth, few blooms, one plant died.

    just giving the small amount of information I have, I'm not that knowledgeable so take with a grain of salt.

    My soil is compacted clay alkaline, zone 9-10, SW 18. Unless otherwise noted the roses are in full day sun.

  • strawchicago z5
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Aimee: You are right, I was looking at James Galway (tiny Shakespeare is invisible in front). I agree that own root doesn't mean more blooms, since Dr. Huey is more vigorous. Dr. Huey can extract nutrients from clay soil better than own roots.

    My neighbor has Dr. Huey growing by her mailbox. It's a monstrous spreading growth with dark green leaves. Pics of full-grown Shakespeare show a wide growth. It's the messy side-way growth that I'm concerned with Dr. Huey, plus suckering, and taking over after a hard winter.

    My own-root Shakespeare grew 2" after 2 days of non-stop rain. He needs a lot of water to maintain a neat, round, and bushy shape.

    Thanks for the list, Aimee - now I now who's OK as own root, and Shakespeare is not best as own-root due to his chlorosis, in a Miracle-Gro potting soil.

  • dublinbay z6 (KS)
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I'm not sure exactly what you are worrying about in connection with WS2000. My WS2000 is about 6 years old and has never suckered or shown any tendency to do such a thing, nor have I heard of any one else's WS2000 ever suckering.

    Mine has never had octopus arms. Admittedly, some canes grow a bit more vigorously than others, giving a mature WS2000 that awkward spreading look, but those definitely were not octopus arms. My impression is that most of the complaints about octopus arms on Austins tend to come from the hotter zones and zones with long growing periods (like all year), especially California.

    I don't remember any problems with chlorosis, but I never plant my roses in potting soil. I sometimes add amendments to my garden soil, but it is still mostly garden soil. Maybe I'm missing the point you were making.

    I guess what I'm really trying to say is that you seem to worry about a lot of things that I rarely give much thought to, and I'm wondering if you are being an "over-anxious mama" hovering over her baby just waiting for something to go wrong. I say, relax and enjoy the process more. : )

    But maybe I'm intruding where I'm not really wanted. My apologies in that case.

    Kate

  • strawchicago z5
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Thanks Kate, I appreciate your reassurance. Our zone 5a west of Chicago is pretty harsh down to -30 windshield factor. I want to make sure that my roses can survive the winter. Fifteen years ago I gave up on roses when they were half-alive through the winter (hybrid tea, grafted on Dr. Huey - they were really vigorous the first year).

    Let's see if William Shakespeare make it through the winter, planted in the ground September 1. I winter-protect my roses up to 12". I was doing the research in advance to see what's the best order for next year: own-root or Dr. Huey for zone 4-5.

    You are right, I don't have to worry about octopus-arms, as CA folks - all my roses are compact and small as own-root.


  • strawchicago z5
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Correction: it's -30 wind chill in Chicago, not windshield factor, LOL! In 1983, Chicago held the record of -82 wind chill factor when the temperature was -23 and 29 mph wind.

  • Maryl (Okla. Zone 7a)
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I've noticed that most of assessments are coming from more northern zones where winter is fast approaching. In my zone we still have a couple of months to see how a rose will behave. This really will be crucial for those of us that were under the heat dome this summer, with temperatures of 100+ for 3 months and drought conditions. Conditions such as those are not really fair for judging the performance of a new rose. There are some roses that might do much better now that the temperatures have begun to moderate somewhat (even though the drought continues).... The two roses that impressed me the most given the above horrible conditions were:
    * Adobe Sunrise
    * Peppermint Parfait.
    Adobe Sunrise was in partial shade and still continues to bloom it's little head off, retaining it's color remarkably well.
    Peppermint Parfait is a stripped pink/white Moore mini with cupped form (OGR)that has been exposed to full sun and temperatures up to 112. It never quit blooming and the blooms last and last.
    I don't know about disease resistance since nothing germinates in the hell fire that was our summer. More to come later.

  • aimeekitty
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I realized that I didn't really answer the original question of the thread.
    I'm zone 9-10, SW 18. hot and dry summers, mild winters!
    Apologies as this is NOT the OGR forum and some of my faves are OGRs or old HTs. :) :) :)

    Ones I really liked this year:

    Lavender Lassie -
    I saw a charming specimin of this at Descanso Gardens that I feel in love with. It was absolutely wonderful. I bought a 2 gallon from ARE and planted at the end of 2010. She's put up at least two 5' or so canes with such beautiful clusters of blooms at the end. She seems really strong and vigorous. I can't wait to see what she does next year.

    La France Cl. -
    Just gets more beautiful and beautiful. It has some little bit of something that makes it more romantic than a typical hybrid tea to me.

    Mme Berard -
    So beautiful. Growing fast and blooming frequently.

    Tipsy Imperial Concubine
    Just a baby but keeps blooming! The blooms are such a lovely mix of colors.

    Sombrieul
    now in it's 2nd year it's really starting to throw up huge canes,... like 6 feet. I'm in love with it. It's blooms are so beautiful. They have it growing up a huge arbor at Descanso, it's to die for. So many petals... !

    Duftendes Weisskirchen
    Planted 8/10 as a band... it's just a charming little thing. It's blooms are such a vibrant purplish hot pink. It wants to bloom all the time and just is very happy.

    Eden Cl. and James Galway cl both put on a LOT of growth and bloom this year (they were planted early '10)

    The Faun (Bossa Nova)
    this blooms more than anything in my yard and I love the fully double old-style blooms on it. I love the low shape of the bush. Great for a border plant so far.

    Archduke Charles
    I love you, Archduke! The blooms change color and even though it's perported to be a slow grower, I'm still getting some growth on mine. Such a charming thing.

    Madame Joseph Bonnaire
    the most beautiful creature. Threw out a couple big canes and a big root down through the pot and into the ground. A vigorous thing! Bounced back after I repotted it and I can't wait to see what it does next year after I get it in the ground. The blooms are GORGEOUS.

    Madame Alfred Carriere
    Despite being in partial shade, throwing up huge canes... can't wait to see what it does next year. Delicate beautiful flowers,... such strong growth!

    Dissappointments:

    Tiffany
    - an own-root since late '09... still super tiny and rather upset. Might replace it with a grafted one.

    William Shakespeare 2000
    1 of 2 died and the 2nd one hasn't grown (both put in the ground early '10). I'll see what it does next year.

    Yves Paiget
    Had to pot because the bed wasn't ready and it outright died, almost immediately after getting it. :\

  • aimeekitty
    11 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    ah, I also realize that none of those were planted in 2011 (except Yves Paiget)... ha... I fail.

    But it seems like a lot of roses take more than one year to show you what they're about.

    I did get Aimee Vibert in 2011 from Rogue Valley Roses, so it's the reblooming non-climbing one, and it's surprisingly vigorous. I'm really happy I got it. :) It's still in a pot for now.

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