SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
lesdvs9

Wisteria among the roses ?

lesdvs9
15 years ago

Anyone growing wisteria among their roses? I can't find a forum for that? Is anyone by any chance got some in one of their gardens? Leslie

Comments (100)

  • jody
    14 years ago

    I planted a Wisteria Chinensis tree in my backyard once. I'd rate it and the running bamboo that my @!&$%&)@(^#(* neighbor planted about equal for invasiveness. I fought them both constantly.

    Don't get me wrong, I like how wisteria looks and smells, but in the south wisteria is way too invasive for most yards. The one I planted escaped its support (actually ripped its support out of the ground and held in in the air like a triumphet child waving a trophy), attacked and nearly killed a nearby pear tree (a big old common pear tree - tough tree) and popped up babies all over a 1 acre back yard. Not good James!!!

    No more wisteria for me. If I lived in the country and could let it loose on a small grove of trees 1/2 mile from the house or something. I NEED all the space in my yard.

  • lesdvs9
    Original Author
    14 years ago

    I was out today and stopped to get a mocha and this in and out java place had a huge arbor with a HUGE Chinese Wisteria draped all over it from one end to the other and it was in bloom. First of all it looked anemic and secondly though the blooms were pretty I could see exactly why I would NOT want this in my yard! I would not want it in my neighbor's yard! Holy cow! I think I'm calling the city today and donating it now....

  • Related Discussions

    Managing Glads among the Roses

    Q

    Comments (37)
    Susan, I do not grow garden glads (I find them too much work too, and the flowers are too showy, I think they compete with, rather than compliment roses), I grow Byzantine glads (g. byzantinus). They are shorter and the flowers much smaller, airier and daintier than the garden hybrids. I love them. I wish I had a problem with them spreading out of control (I wouldn't mind that), but they are not terribly aggressive... They never need staking. Masha On a blog, at the end of a post, there is a little sign that displays the number of comments (e.g. "10 comments"), click on that, and you will see everybody's comments, scroll to the end and you should see the "Post Comment" window.
    ...See More

    1912 a tea rose among women

    Q

    Comments (7)
    Duchesse, Now you've gotten me to learn more. I always thought/remembered wrongly that the Mrs. Wilson who was the de facto president after Wilson was incapacitated was the Mrs. Wilson to whom he was married when first elected. I remembered his first wife had died, but thought that was significantly before his election. So now we see a Georgia connection and even more of a reason for the Atlanta Constitution to use such 'Atlanta Constitution society column gushy words' in this piece. Searching the Atlanta Constitution for info on roses has led to some descriptions of social events (with rose decorations) that are so sugary as to induce near diabetic comas in the healthiest of us. Here is a link that might be useful: Her burial (and a cemetery to check for roses)
    ...See More

    Why are there truffles growing among my roses roots?

    Q

    Comments (3)
    Take a look at this article by Shannon Berch; An image of the species of truffle is avaiable at BCTruffles.ca Two exciting new truffle finds on Vancouver Island In October, my husband Hoke and I were redoing a garden bed in back to expand our hardy fuchsia planting. At about drip-line of a planted willow, we dug up about 10 small white truffles. I confirmed that they were truffles (i.e. species of the scientific genus Tuber) and not one of the myriad other truffle-like hypogeous fungi by examining the spores under the microscope. I figured that they were one or other of the Oregon white truffles (Tuber oregonense or Tuber gibbosum) but using the identification key that a colleague went me, was unable with confidence to call them either species. So, I asked my colleague Dr. Mary Berbee at UBC to sequence the DNA of the collection and compare it to other Tuber species. She graciously did this and told me that the fungus was Tuber rapaeodorum. Greg Bonito, PhD candidate at Duke University in Tuber taxonomy, tells me "this is a European species, but has been found all over the world including NE & NW USA, and New Zealand. It is the most widespread Tuber, and most common "unidentified Tuber" in GenBank. It likely has been introduced to these regions unintentionally via horticulture. It tends to be small in size, and pale, similar to Tuber maculatum." I believe that we must have introduced it on the willow we bought from a local nursery, but who really knows. Then, about a month later, I found a couple of specimens of Hydnangium carneum at the drip line of the big Eucalyptus growing at Glendale Garden and Woodlands in Saanich. According to the North American Truffling Society (http://www.natruffling.org/): "Hydnangium carneum associates exclusively with Eucalyptus trees. It is native to Australia but hitch-hiked to North America on the roots of imported ornamentals." I believe that both of these finds constitute new reports of these fungi for Canada. ________________________________________ By Shannon Berch: 15 Jan 2009 From the Truffle Association of BC website www.bctruffles.ca
    ...See More

    Is There Winter Interest, Among Your Old-Fashioned Roses?

    Q

    Comments (26)
    I hibernate like my roses and watch the garden from a window. From my kitchen window I can see the blanda rose 'Betty Bland' with red canes next to Rosa pendulina, with its red flagonshaped hips. Other roses with hips near the house are R. moyesii, alba Suaveolens, R. stellata mirifica, the Portland rose and several rugosas. Pines, junipers, box and yew topiary add evergreen interest. The highlight of my winter garden is the round boxedged bed that looks wonderful powdered with snow while the sides are green. Close to the front door are two large box balls, mahonia, cherry laurel, Christmas roses and a clipped yew with red berries. I have put most evergreens where I can see them from inside or walking up to the house, redleaved bergenia 'Winterglow', rhododendrons, periwinkle, eight small box balls, euonymus 'Emerald'n Gold', cotoneaster 'Coral Beauty' and dwarf conifers like Picaea glauca 'Conica'.
    ...See More
  • ogroser
    14 years ago

    Jody - don't even think about turning wisteria loose 1/2 mile away in the countryside. And don't let it out of strict control ANYWHERE. It may look pretty for 10 days, but for 355 days a year it may have you or someone else cursing, if unattended. Enjoy it in a large pot or other species may actually be as pleasant and less invasive than the chinese form. However, I am still struggling to learn about roses and have no expertise concerning wistera, except as previously described. Regards.

  • spanaval
    14 years ago

    After battling with various non-native invasives all these years, and fighting to get natives re-established, I'd strongly suggest that anyone planning on planting potentially invasive plants please reconsider. Planting a non-native Wisteria is about as environmentally/biodiversity friendly as planting multiflora roses. In the long run, just about everyone, including the person who planted it, will likely regret that decision.

    JMO,
    Suja

  • jbcarr
    14 years ago

    Sounds like roses among your wisteria is what happens eventually.

  • farmerray
    14 years ago

    This seems to have become a thread about Wisteria....
    I have one in the front of my house and one in the rear of my house, both are about 1 foot from the house (planted about three years ago). I prune it twice a year, summer and winter as directed by some japanese gardening magazine (Roth Tien?). I also have three of them that are in pots that I plan to put in the ground around an arbor and a pergola later on. The flowering period last about 4-5 weeks because the different plants don't all flower at exactly the same time and they don't have the same sun exposure watering etc. The smell is intoxicating in the spring. I love this plant but you guys are scaring me. I know that it has to be maintained - My question is will I regret even though I am taking care of it?

    {{gwi:318626}}

  • york_rose
    14 years ago

    My experience as a kid was with the runners in the lawn. I was thunderstruck at how far the ran.

  • Karen Jurgensen (Zone 4 MN)
    14 years ago

    Well,

    I know here in zone 4 we're a far far cry from all you warmer zone gardeners! I just wanted to share my experience with Blue Moon wisteria... in case the northern gardeners are lusting after all the gorgeous wisteria pics. This will be it's 2nd spring with me, and after last years very tame growth, I have to say godzila it isn't! I maybe got 2' of growth last year! I'm moving it closer to my house, since it isn't hardly gaining any growth, and would probably be happier in a more sheltered location. I was going for a wisteria standard... but ah no! It is a little slower to wake up in the spring, but it does survive the brutal winters admirably, while it's godzilla cousins can't take the cold. So if you are pining for wisteria, don't want a take over the house godzilla, or need something reasonably cold hardy, try this one! (Aunt Dee is another good one for us northereners!)

  • graybear
    14 years ago

    Never grew Wisteria in Roses but here in SC it grows wild everywhere.
    If it gets out of hand I have my old standby "Roundup".
    It works great for "Mamosa" as well.
    Both of them at times require a double or triple dose to insure the death of the main root.

  • Janaina (Zone 6B - Maryland)
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Omg!!! I just spent $100 on a 3 gallon Amethyst Fall Wisteria.. Im horrified with the comments above. I Called the nursery to cancel my order, but it has been shipped already earlier this morning. As soon as I receive the plant I will put it in the garbage can...i wont even open the box. Dont want risk of seeds falling down on my yard. Its so dangerous... How could I not research about this plant before buying it? Im so upset!!!

  • jacqueline9CA
    4 years ago

    We have a bed where (knowledge from family history) a large wisteria was planted in the 1920s or 1930s. It got so big that the teenage son of the family (who eventually evolved into my FIL), when he was sneaking home from being out late, used to climb up the wisteria to get to the third floor screened "sleeping porch", where they kept beds for hot summer nights. By the time we moved in, that one had been replaced by what my FIL told me had to be rootstock, because it looked nothing like the original. It did bloom, but with wimpy flowers. The exploding seeds meant that I had wisteria weeds everywhere. We eventually decided to take it out. Ha! It got dug up, poisoned, etc. several times. Shoots of it are STILL coming up in that bed. So, the rootstock plant has been there 100 years...

    Jackie

  • garden nut z9b
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Amethyst falls wisteria is a non invasive wisteria so it could probably be contained. I have a wisteria Which I believe is amethyst falls and I grow it as a small standard and it does okay. It blooms in April-June and not too vigorous. I snap off the seed pods when I see them since it puts ok maybe a dozen flower clusters I have Roseville noisette near it and as well as hawainette daylilies and small perennials/annuals and haven't had problems.

  • Vicissitudezz
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    The thuggish wisterias are the Asian imports (Chinese wisteria & Japanese wisteria). Your 'Amethyst Falls' is a cultivar of the native wisteria, so shouldn't be nearly as aggressive.

    I have the species plant (Wisteria frutescens), and it's just starting to spread around in its third year. I kinda wish we'd gotten the cultivar since it would probably bloom more (but more blooms = more seeds, so maybe we're better off?).

    Don't panic, but this is a vine, and if it's happy and healthy it can get large, and- if left unattended- presumably strangle nearby plants. The difference is that the Asian wisterias seem able to do this almost overnight, while the American wisteria grows far more slowly, and you should be able to keep it under control fairly easily.

    Enjoy!

    Virginia

  • Janaina (Zone 6B - Maryland)
    4 years ago
    1. Thanks everyone for the reply!! I love all types of Wisteria! What a gorgeous vine!!! I have been admiring this tree forever. But after reading all the stories, pros and cons, I realized this tree is not for me... I have a super energetic, very active 3 years old child and I don't want to babysit a tree on top of all my responsabilities. My house is extremally old, and on the middle of the yard we have an immense swiminpool and if the root of this vine happens to damage the pipes, i dont think my husband will answer for himself. LOL.. I have been reading more negative than positives comments about wisteria.... I got chills just reading Shellfleur gardening experience. Pushing up sidewalks, demaging foundation of houses, and in some cases some houses that are for sale stay sitting on the market forever, bc of this tree. I didn't know the root of this plant can go for miles underground.... What a nightmare! If I was living in a farm, or on a 10 acres propriety i would buy couple of wisterias....but its not the case. Iam not upset about the lost of the money. Iam upset with myself. There are so many information about this plant, and I acted impulsively. i bought it first, for only then get all the info needed.. Sometimes I do stupid things.... thank you guys!
  • Robin Lemke
    4 years ago

    It really depends on the type, though, and where you live, doesn't it? My college had a lovely wisteria arbor near the English department where I took all my classes. I know they didn't fuss with it. This was in Santa Barbara and it just did its thing with no problems. I've definitely thought of a non-invasive type for somewhere in my yard in Seattle.

  • Janaina (Zone 6B - Maryland)
    4 years ago

    robin, I am brazilian but I lived in Seattle for 10 years. 8 years in Wallingford and 2 years in Queen Anne. Every Summer I used to go for a daily walks around Green Lake. I love Seattle so much. Great neighborhoods... Love Fremont trail as well. Used to workout at SMB by Lake Union. I learned to love roses while living there. The Rose Garden in Wallingford by the Zoo is amazing! Well... Right now i live in Maryland. Very differnet than Seattle, very hot and humid!!!! :) but i am decided to keep growing roses and hydrangeas and leave the vines for the braves.

  • Robin Lemke
    4 years ago

    Oh, it's always so nice to meet someone who loves Seattle! We were just at Greenlake earlier this week. ;) I like to walk around the lake and then reward myself with a margarita at Rositas. ;) I do understand - whenever people want to grow blackberries I get twitchy. I love them, but man are they hard to keep under control. Enjoy the roses and hydrangeas!


  • jerijen
    4 years ago

    I have just spent the whole morning cutting back 3 months of runaway growth on an old wisteria. It didn't used to be this badly-behaved, but I think it has gone to rootstock. When it reached the point where I could not open the gate into the greenhouse-and-pot area, and couldn't enter the old dog runs (which are now potting-shed and storage). I took it on.

    Only this one end, however. It completely covers the dog run, and is trying to eat a trumpet vine and strangle any nearby roses.

    Don't plant it! It would take dynamite to get rid of this one, and DH still loves it. So I am stuck with it. This is AFTER removal of two trash cans full of cuttings!

    The trunk is lower left.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    4 years ago

    Gorgeous, Jeri! I'm sorry I'm uneducable. I'll remember you told me so. I even read the thread of difficulties people have and planted one anyway. I think it was all those gardening books I read while living cold. You tried! At least I could learn to prune it.

  • User
    4 years ago

    You are not alone, Sheila.I love wisteria, and have several plants. Maybe it's just that they are still relatively young (oldest one 8-9 years in my garden),or that my conditions are so harsh, but I'm not seeing any real aggressiveness on the part of my plants. What's more, since I lust so for organic matter, I'd be delighted for an extra "two trash cans full of cuttings" (LOL! Jeri, why didn't you just send them over here to me in Italy,LOL!)

  • jerijen
    4 years ago

    AH BART! If I could, I would.

    But, really -- THIS is not a wisteria any of you would want. It blooms sparingly, and grows mightily.

    It wasn't like that, until a big chunk of the pine tree next door fell on it. I fear that we now have a massive rootstock plant.

  • Kristine LeGault 8a pnw
    4 years ago

    The home we moved in to had a wisteria wrapped around a redbud tree. It had strangled the live UT of that poor tree. It also dropped seeds everywhere. They pop up in the lawn and the flower bed.

    Our lot is 80ft wide and the wisteria roots go completly end to end. Every time I dig a hole I spend hours pulling out wisteria roots and some of those suckers ate gigantic.

    The Bain of my existence

    Lol

  • totoro z7b Md
    4 years ago

    I grow 2 Wisteria, one Japanese and one American in containers. I also deadhead the flowers so no seed pods form. I am hoping this will contain them. I am also training climbing roses to grow with them.

    Brookside Gardens has a lovely pergola with roses climbing up the Wisteria as well.

  • antmarmac
    4 years ago

    I just read through this thread because I want to put a climbing rose a couple of feet in front of my arch of emerald falls wisteria. I wasn’t sure if this was a good idea, but I saw a comment that I feel is so inaccurate I felt compelled to write.

    I assure you an EMERALD FALLS WISTERIA when in bloom smells like a gorgeous French perfume. I clean the litter box of my male cat and there is absolutely no resemblance whatsoever ever! Yes it is exotic and powerful. Obviously smell is a very personal thing but given the popularity of EFW I believe my nose is spot on.

  • Vicissitudezz
    4 years ago

    Hmm... I was just thinking yesterday that I should try to find this thread, to remark that my American Wisteria has become less mannerly in its third year here, and is making land grabs wherever possible. My husband loves wisteria, though, so I will continue to encourage him to wage war against the far more thuggish Asian wisterias, while I try to keep pruning the native.

    There really is no comparison, though- the imported thugs will take over while your back is turned, while the native species (and I still regret that I didn't get one of the cultivars out now for better blooms), has taken several years to become somewhat aggressive.

    I'm assuming that Sheila and the OP have made their decisions by now, but future readers may want to consider one of the more mannerly cultivars of an American species (W. frutescens and W. macrostachya* being the two that I know of, and some consider the latter to be a sub-species of the former). These might not be good for areas where a thug's survival instincts are needed for less than ideal gardening conditions.

    Here's a handy link about the 'Amethyst Falls' cultivar of W. frutescens. The following blurb is about 3 cv's of W. macrostachya:

    *Cultivars and their differences

    Aunt Dee Kentucky wisteria (Wisteria macrostachya 'Aunt Dee'): Flowers are light purple with a light fragrance. This plant is considered slightly more hardy than the species and may perform well in zone 4.

    Blue Moon Kentucky wisteria (Wisteria macrostachya 'Blue Moon'): Blue-purple flowers. This plant is considered slightly more hardy than the species and may perform well in zone 4.

    Clara Mack Kentucky wisteria (Wisteria macrostachya 'Clara Mack'): White flowers.

    I hope this helps someone.

    Virginia

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    We put in a grafted "Cooke's Special" wisteria next to the yellow "Lady Banks" and it is climbing on a pergola my husband built next to the shop. So far so good. The wisteria repeated bloom all summer. The pergola is quite a ways from the house.Third summer here.


  • User
    4 years ago

    I seem to remember reading somewhere that,though less thuggish, American wisterias like Blue Moon (wisteria macrostachya) is much less spectacular than it's Asian relatives; is this true or false?

  • Vicissitudezz
    4 years ago

    bart, I don't grow any of the cultivars, but suppose that they are selections that bloom better than the straight species. And/or they may have been selected for hardiness? Still, I doubt that any of them is as spectacular as the thugs.

    Sheila, what is your 'Cooke's Special' grafted onto, if you don't mind my asking?

    Virginia

  • Kristine LeGault 8a pnw
    4 years ago

    I don't know what devil variety was planted here but even after digging roots or two years it is still popping up everywhere grrrr

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    4 years ago

    I don't know, Virginia. I bought it locally. I'm surprised it blooms all Spring and Summer.

  • Vicissitudezz
    4 years ago
    last modified: 4 years ago

    Apparently, Millettia reticulata is considered by some to be a Wisteria alternative, since a common name for it is Evergreen Wisteria. Evidently, it is better-behaved than real wisteria, although not really evergreen, except in zones 9 and warmer.

    I don't grow it, but have seen it in a local park (see my photo in the first link), and it is very attractive. I didn't notice the fragrance, but I blame my unreliable nose; fragrance is supposed to be one of its selling points.

    Does anyone here grow it?

    Virginia

    Here's another photo of the same plant... both photos taken in too much sun:

  • oldgardener_2009
    4 years ago

    I have a wisteria that I trained into a tree shape. It grew so big and cast so much deep shade, I lost an entire rose bed. So, no. Bad idea.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    4 years ago

    I'm hoping nothing can swamp a Lady Banks Rose. We might have to learn how to prune wisteria. Shading the shop would be a good thing in our case.

  • nle3
    4 years ago

    Hi everyone, this is to answer bart_2015

    In my opinion, the Japanese types are the most beautiful ones. Each flower can be as long as 36 inches or longer and so fragrance. The Chinese type is about 12 inches long. I think all types of Wisteria flowers are similar and just difference in length and fragrance. I have not seen Kentucky type but Amethyst fall smells horrible and the flower is short, and to me, it's not pretty like other types.

    I live in Northern VA . I bought 2 Japanese types when they're covered with flowers, one purple and one white, about 4 and 1/2 yrs ago. Each was 6 feet tall then. Each about 8 feet tall now. Still in tree form. The white one had 4 flowers 2 yrs ago and it's branches are getting longer but I keep it short. The purple one still has short branches.

    I see some runners at the base of these trees and I cut them off. So far, they are very well behave for me.

    And Leslie, if you like them then go ahead and grow them. I was reluctant to buy wisteria at first but couldn't help it when I saw them full of blooms at the nursery.

    I really wish that I can see these blooms again this Spring.

    Roses need a lot of sun. I think Azalea are beautiful when they are in bloom at the same time with Wisteria.

    Yen



  • pat m
    3 years ago

    I planted a wisteria over a pergola, after seeing how beautiful wisteria was at Lake Como. Well, it grew and grew, and went right up a big tree, and strangled it. I had to have the tree cut down, and now really keep an eye on what it is trying to attach itself to next.

  • Kristine LeGault 8a pnw
    3 years ago

    I lost a redbud tree to wisteria. I just noticed a start about 60 ft from where I dug it up.

  • User
    3 years ago

    Thank you for responding to my question, Yen. I love the way Chinese wisteria covers itself in flowers before the leaves come out. I think Japanese wisteria can be spectacular as well, though you don't see them around as much here in Italy. I tried growing "Amethyst Falls",not realizing that it was an entirely different type of plant . It never "covered itself in flowers" at all,just produced a scattering of blooms amongst the leaves. Looking on Internet,I see that a lot of the pictures of Amethyst Falls confirm my impression that it wasn't just my plant that refused to be spectacular: (for example https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/307469/) Likewise milletia reticulata just doesn't "do" the same thing for me that the Asian wisterias do. So I am curious to know about these Kentucky wisterias, like "Blue Moon" and "Aunt Dee" ; do they flower like the Asian ones, or more like the frutescens?

    Sad to say, I'm still struggling to get my wisterias to thrive. Maybe it's the uber-dry, hot summers,the poor soil, etc., but none of mine are showing any signs of being in the least thuggish...

  • portlandmysteryrose
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    I wish I could add more details to what I'm about to share, but, unfortunately I was too young to ask the right questions when I lived beside two mature wisteria "trees." When I was growing up in Dallas, TX, where wisteria can run rampant, two different neighbors grew Japanese wisteria as small trees of maybe 8-9 feet tall. Even after decades, the trees were well-behaved. They were grown by gardeners who probably spaded every runner and remained on top of pruning. I do recall that the trees were severely pruned at least once per year. I'm guessing the choice variety was grafted onto rootstock of some kind but can't be sure. The trees would have been planted sometime in the early to mid 1960s, I believe. A tree survived into the 2000s at one location, and the tree at the other location was removed recently.

    I also have a few neighbors here in Portland who grow Japanese wisteria on their porches. They harshly prune once a year and then wack stray tendrils all growing season. Their houses remain uneaten even though the wisteria plants are old with large trunks and obviously have been offered years of opportunity to consume everything in their paths.

    Climate is a big factor, and Portland falls at the same latitude as part of Japan. So, this might be a good area to keep Japanese wisteria in check and at its best...until global warming changes everything. However, I should add that even in Portland, untended wisteria will rip the siding off your home when you turn your back. It's no delicate, large flowered clematis!

    I sympathize with Jeri and Kristine. Rootstock is the biggest thug! Viscious, sneaky, aggressive and thoroughly immoral. I wonder if there are nurseries that offer cutting grown plants like roses from own-root nurserie? I think I'd lean toward cutting grown when choosing a wisteria cultivar in order to avoid the "thing beneath the soil" escaping and smothering home and garden! Carol

  • pat m
    3 years ago

    I have my aggressive wisteria on one side of the yard. On the other side I have an equally aggressive Virginia Creeper!

  • Vicissitudezz
    3 years ago

    bart, if you didn't like 'Amethyst Falls', I really wouldn't expect any of the other American wisteria cultivars to suit your floral preferences. It seems that they may be hardy in a few places where the Asian varieties aren't, but I think the real benefit of growing an American species is that it is slower growing, and thus less invasive/destructive. In much of the eastern U.S., conditions are just too favorable. As mentioned, wisterias will strangle trees and reseed like crazy here.

    Virginia

  • User
    3 years ago

    Thank you, Virginia, that is sort of what I wanted to know. I recently found "Blue Moon" available at a nursery here in Italy, but it isn't worth spending money on it in my situation if it's flowering habit is basically like that of the Amethyst Falls pictured on the Dave's Garden site.

  • Vicissitudezz
    3 years ago

    I believe that the Kentucky species (or sub-species) does have larger flowers than the American species, but I'm pretty sure that neither has flowers as large as the Asian species.

    How did 'Amethyst Falls' grow for you, though? Was it as vigorous as the plant you have now?

  • User
    3 years ago

    Sorry it took a while for me to get back,Virginia. My wisteria situation is complicated, so I can't give a simple response to your question. Since I had always read about how thuggish wisteria is supposed to be, how drought-tolerant and vigorous, I planted my first wisterias in areas of my garden that are un-adapted for roses due to poor and shallow soil (i.e.,very rocky,even having bedrock close to the surface in spots. My garden is on a hill, about 600 meters above sea level,with erosion issues). Well, I learned that wisteria-at least in my garden-is by no means all that thuggish and vigorous! Two of mine-a Chinese and a Japanese-look like they are basically dwindling away,not being vigorous enough to thrive in the drought of summer in the soil conditions they have. Another japanese(?) one,"Prematura" is instead growing very vigourously and I want to prune it more in hopes of getting more flowers. Two "Prolifics" are doing Ok, it seems, though one has never flowered and I'm beginning to wonder if maybe it, too, has overly thin soil. A third Prolific is doing well, but it has good soil.So, it's hard to make a comparison . Amethyst Falls seemed OK as a plant,but ended out dying off at the graft. It wasn't the size of the flowers that disappointed me ; it was the quantity; they didn't cover the whole plant the way the Chinese ones do...

  • nle3
    3 years ago

    Hi bart-2005, is there any tip how to prune Japanese wisteria to get it to bloom. One of my bloomed 2 yrs ago and one never bloomed. When I got them from the nursery, they're both full of blooms. I am in VA. I read that wisteria should be pruned once in July and again in January or February. I really appreciate if you can give some ideas. Thank you.

  • User
    3 years ago

    I wish I could help you,nie3,but I myself am still "stumbling around in the dark", as it were, when it comes to wisteria. Maybe you could try posting on the Vines forum to see if anyone there can help...

  • nle3
    3 years ago

    Thank you bart_2015

  • Lizzi Francis
    last year

    Does anyone think wisteria will grow in Northern Arizona? It is very hot and windy all the time, should I worry about it taking over?

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    last year

    I bet it would do fine.


  • Plumeria Girl (Florida ,9b)
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Sheila, its beautiful.

    @Lizzi

    I read Japanese and China types are invasive. ( Floribunda and Sinensis ) The North American type is not invasive called
    Wisteria Frutescens or something like that.

    I know Jasmin and Perma has it growing here, Florida, in their Neighborhood. I saw one here but it is not scented.

    You can grow any but you have to control Japanese and Chinese one.