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alwayzbgrateful

what striped roses can I grow?

Alwayzbgrateful
10 years ago

I live in central tx (by Baylor university) I'm attempting to start a garden for my grandmother who's now 90'ish yrs young and health is declining. She had a beautiful garden in Corpus Christi, tx and took all her roses with her when she moved to California. We came back to tx with her about 10 yrs ago unfortunately when came , some of her beloved roses didnt survive the trip, and a few died in a horrid and unexpected freeze we had a few yrs ago. She asked me if I would be willing to help her replace some of tge ones she lost. But I want to not only replace them but create an entire rose garden for her so she can enjoy herself. She raised 12 kids one with down syndrome, and a couple grandkids, so I think its time for her to sit back and let someone else do something for her. Anywhoo sorry for this novel but my grandmother loves striped roses and I'd like to get some that will grow well here, I'm a total newbie, and dont really know what will preform well in this inhospitable environment. I have gotten raspberry cream twirl, and purple splash. I have more than enough room for a lot of roses. I just dont know what else I should get. Thank you for taking the time to read this , and thank you in advance to anyone that might can help me, help my grandmother.

Comments (35)

  • Brittie - La Porte, TX 9a
    10 years ago

    I really like Rock and Roll. It's red & white and smells really good. There's also Oranges and Lemons, Scentimental, Red Intuition and All American Magic (I also have this one, but it's still pretty new).

  • plantloverkat north Houston - 9a
    10 years ago

    If she likes singles, Deanna Krause would be sure to do well for her as it was bred in Texas. Sometimes the flowers are more pink, and sometimes more white - each one is different.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Deanna Krause at HMFRoses

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  • plantloverkat north Houston - 9a
    10 years ago

    Rowdy Roy is a miniature that I received from Two Sisters Roses this spring. It blooms in flushes with rests in between, but so far it has been healthy for me. The flowers seem to last well and age gracefully.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Rowdy Roy at HMFRoses

  • kstrong
    10 years ago

    I grow somewhere between 80 and 100 striped roses. Favorites of those that are readily available commercially are the following, roughly in order.

    CLIMBERS (many striped roses are happy climbers)
    Fourth of July (still the best easily available striper around)
    Berrries N Cream
    Purple Splash
    Shadow Dancer
    Flamingo Dancer
    CandlyLand
    Hurdy Gurdy

    NOT CLIMBERS
    Rock & Roll
    All American Magic
    Perfume Tiger
    Camille Pissaro
    Chihuly
    Julio Iglesias

    In general, all of the climbers in the striped classes are better roses than the non-climbers. Don't know why, but that just seems to be the case -- climbing and stripes go together. And the climbers are also easier to find commercially. So DO make some room for the climbers, or build a pergola, obelisk or fence for them. Worth the effort.

    Have fun, I love what you are doing there.

  • Alwayzbgrateful
    Original Author
    10 years ago

    Oh wow thank you for all ur wonderful suggestions! I've used HMF for most since I don't know what any look like! Lol! I wonder if our local nursery can special order some for me? We only have 2 in town, and 2 that are about an hour or so away. (The closest anyway) Or do u think ordering online might be best? Sorry for all the questions! Like I said total newbie!! Grandma had one 12+yrs ago that was a climber it was pink and yellow looks a LOT like cl candy land. I thought it was till I did a little digging and found out cl candy land was introduced recently. Anyone know what it could be? It was one of the ones that didn't make the trip here. Oh yea and does anyone know what in the world I can do about this darn soil!!??!! I started digging a small spot to put down Rasp cream twirl, and quickly realized that whoever lived here before (or their crew) was the laziest bunch! They simply put all the broken windows, nails, roofing shingles, brick, etc all around the grounds and covered it up with about 1-2ft of dirt!!! Can u believe that!!! Talk about a surprise when I put the shovel in and pulled out broken glass shards! ! Thanx again for all ur help!!!!!!

  • roseblush1
    10 years ago

    Two of my favorite stripes are 'Pinstripe' and 'Kim Rupert'. Both have done well in zone 8 and in my high temps of summer. KR was registered as a mini, but there is nothing miniature about the rose.

    Pinstripe:

    Here is a link that might be useful: Kim Rupert on HMF

  • dublinbay z6 (KS)
    10 years ago

    Order online--at Chamblees (Texas), or drive there if you are close enough. However, a gorgeous stripe like Red Intuition is only available, as far as I know, from the Canadian nursery called Palatine--good place. I order from them a lot.

    If a local garden center has one of your desired roses right there on hand, go ahead and buy it. Don't know about garden centers in your area, but those in my area won't make "special orders." I get almost all my roses online.

    Kate

  • jerijen
    10 years ago

    Second the recommendation of 'Fourth Of July.' I like Lyn's recommendations, too.

    You won't want ALL stripes. That would be as chaotic as a passel of kids! Some solid colors -- reds, pinks, and whites, and some yellows, will provide balance.

    In addition to Chamblees, check out the Antique Rose Emporium website. They, too, have long experience with good roses for Texas.

    Good luck!

    Jeri

  • kstrong
    10 years ago

    Probably was Berries N Cream -- that was THE climbing striper to have years back, until Fourth of July came along. Not yellow, but it still takes an expert to tell them (Berries N Cream and CandyLand) apart now. Get whatever you can from the local nursery, and then get in touch with a mail order source that sells grafted plants, Talk to your nurseryman NOW since now is when he is placing his regular bareroot rose order for this year. Any time later and he won't be able to "special order" anything. You also want the biggest plants you can get, since g'ma is "90'ish." No fooling around waiting for growth.

    For mail order sources,Palatine in Canada sells the very biggest plants you will find. After that, any of the U.S. sources would be fine, Regans, Rosmania, Edmunds etc.

    As for the soil, sometimes it is easier to go UP than down. Put in a little edging -- some kind of board or something and call it a "semi-raised" bed, maybe a foot high. And then fill that with something good, delivered by some company that sells the stuff by the yard. Try and break up the native soil a little at the transition between the native ground and the added material, and the roses will eventually find their own way. This method will take lots of hand-watering to begin with, but it does work.

    This post was edited by kstrong on Sun, Aug 18, 13 at 17:36

  • Alwayzbgrateful
    Original Author
    10 years ago

    Thanx !!! For all ur help!!!! I've got chamblee's palatine and antique rose emp all saved ! Thank you !!! Any one got suggestions on my question above about the soil/glass&roofing? ? I don't want to sound like a bug but I don't want to kill grandmas garden either. ;) I can't afford to hire an excavator, my husband and I are raising 6kiddos caring for grandma, mom, and uncle (with down syndrome). So we kinda gotta budget (a little anyway) ;-) Thanx again!

  • Alwayzbgrateful
    Original Author
    10 years ago

    Thanx !!! For all ur help!!!! I've got chamblee's palatine and antique rose emp all saved ! Thank you !!! Any one got suggestions on my question above about the soil/glass&roofing? ? I don't want to sound like a bug but I don't want to kill grandmas garden either. ;) I can't afford to hire an excavator, my husband and I are raising 6kiddos caring for grandma, mom, and uncle (with down syndrome). So we kinda gotta budget (a little anyway) ;-) Thanx again!

  • Alwayzbgrateful
    Original Author
    10 years ago

    Ooooohhhh, awwww!! I can't stop drooling over all those BEAUTIFUL striped roses!!! When I showed grandma she goes, "yes mija I'd like two of all of 'em!" Lol!! With building the raised beds , will it be harmful to the roses whentheir roots finally reach the ground? All the glass/roofing junk? Or can they do ok if I just leave it alone?

  • Alwayzbgrateful
    Original Author
    10 years ago

    This came out of one shovel full of "dirt" ! Its half a 10gal bucket!

  • kstrong
    10 years ago

    God only knows what's down there. It may or may not be harmful to roses, but probably they'll just go around it, whatever "it" is. There's no way to find out except to plant them and see how it goes. The only other thing you could do is build real, self contained raised bed (at least two feet tall and permanent structures that are separated from the junk/ground). That's too much work. I'd just do it the way I originally said, were it me.

  • floridarosez9 Morgan
    10 years ago

    Two words: horse manure. Find a stable or barn near you. Many of them will load it on your trailer for you just to get rid of it. It's amazing that you're willing to plant a rose garden considering all your responsibilities.

  • bluegirl_gw
    10 years ago

    Third vote for Fourth of July. It doesn't have a lot of petals but it's an exuberant healthy plant that throws lots of flowers. It has a nice scent & also sets lots of fertile seeds (all my seedlings looked like the mother plant).

    If you're in Waco you might have heavy clay gumbo soil to deal with, so I second the suggestion to build your rose bed up a bit. I don't think the construction trash will affect the roses. Yeah, it's really aggravating, but doesn't seem like you'll be able to dig it out. plus glass & shingle junk should be pretty inert. Build on top of what's there.

    Tyler is a couple of hours east, but if you can swing a trip, Chamblees is wonderful. They also ship, of course, & their plants are well-rooted & ready to thrive.

    If you get interested in old garden roses--& I bet your Grandma might recognize some of the grand oldies like Cecile Brunner, Crimson Glory, Louis Phillipe, Archduke Charles & some of the old teas, Chinas & noisettes--Bonnie's Greenhouse used to carry a good selection of old garden roses at reasonable prices.

    The Antique Rose Emporium in Independence ships big plants, too & has a wonderful selection. It's really worth a trip in the spring when the display gardens start to bloom--really incredible. And they should also have a gorgeous fall display--Oct. is often one of our best bloom months.

    I know you requested striped roses, most of which are modern, but don't rule anything out. Since you're in central Tx, nothing is too far & you're pretty close to a couple of the best suppliers in the nation.

    And best wishes, how very good of you to plan something to bring your grandmother happiness :-)

  • jerijen
    10 years ago

    There are areas in our garden where, if you dig a couple of feet down, you hit trash. Broken Concrete blocks, old drainage pipe (this was a hillside orchard, long, long ago). At least it's hard for gophers and moles to get through that!

    Do the raised bed. DO find the horse manure, and compost it. Should do fine.

    Jeri

  • Alwayzbgrateful
    Original Author
    10 years ago

    Oh my goodness y'all are AWESOME!! Thank you so so so much for all your help! !! Just a few short hours ago I was afraid I had to keep everything in pots, or not at all. I cannot thank you all enough! !! Really truly, from the bottom of my heart THANK YOU!!!

  • ingrid_vc so. CA zone 9
    10 years ago

    If anyone is awesome, it's you! Not only, judging by your picture, are you gorgeous, but you're caring for an incredible number of people, and now you're doing this wonderful thing for your grandmother.

    Please do keep in mind that when you order online the roses are going to be much smaller than what you see in a walk-in nursery. You can buy some fabulous roses that way but a climber for instance will take a few years before it will be a good size and bloom. I'd suggest that you at least begin with 5-gallon plants that will bloom right away to give your granny something to look at as soon as possible.

    Good look and we're rooting for you all the way.

    Ingrid

  • bluegirl_gw
    10 years ago

    Oh! another good rose nursery is Roses Unlimited. They have a huge selection of modern & old roses. They ship out good sized plants with nice root balls.
    Have fun with your roses!

  • Alwayzbgrateful
    Original Author
    10 years ago

    Thank you so much ingrid, for your kind words! I started buying some soil for raised beds, and looking into ordering some roses online. Grandma and I have fallen in LOVE with some roses from J&P and Hortico, but I've seen a LOT of negative reviews on "Daves Garden" about both. Has anyone here used them recently? If so anything good or bad to report? I checked into some other places but I guess Vintage is no longer in business, and everywhere else seems to sell bands? Im guessing thats what yall meant by smaller/younger roses. Bands are the fairly recently rooted cuttings? Right? Lol sorry for my ignorance but theres so much knowledge to gain. I fear I've not even begun to scratch the surface.
    Wishing y'all the very best for your gardens!
    -Lyna

  • kstrong
    10 years ago

    Sending money to Hortico is like playing the lottery -- sometimes you win, sometimes you lose. I buy from them knowing that. That said, I have gotten some fine roses from them on the times that I came out ahead on that equation. I have also lost some money. The frustrating thing about them is that they follow their own timing. They always take your money right away, and then you can wait literally forever to receive your plants. This year, next year, whatever.

    J&P is better than Hortico, but not by much. They -- the real Jackson and Perkins -- were scooped up in Bankruptcy a few years back by a bunch of know-nothings that were chosen by the bankruptcy judge in order to keep jobs in a certain local area near where the bankruptcy was filed. All the people who knew anything about roses are long gone. The new J&P people are expert in photo-shopping pretty pictures in catalogs (and in mailing you one every other day), but I haven't heard from anyone that they really like any of the actual new roses that J&P is selling. Me, I stay away.

    For your requirements, I would stay away from "bands." You don't want to wait several years to have a garden, and Texas can be tough on baby plants. And bands are truly baby plants, meant for people wanting a specific variety and willing to wait a long while to get them to size.

    I still think the grafted plants are your best bet. And if you have extra money, and really want your plants to get huge extra fast, then get them grafted on fortuniana rootstock. There's only two sellers for that, and both are expensive, but very reliable. K&M Roses and Cool Roses

    Most other vendors of grafted plants use either Multiflora rootstock (in Canada, mostly) or Dr. Huey rootstock (the US vendors). Both are just fine, but not nearly as vigorous as fortuniana. The downside for fortuniana is that the roots are generally shallow and therefore not particularly cold hardy if the ground freezes solid during snowy winters. Not a problem for those of us in California or Texas.

  • kstrong
    10 years ago

    p.s. the problem you are having finding grafted plants this time of year is that we are still a little bit ahead of the season for that. The Canadians open their bareroot orders on/about Sept 1 each year, and the US vendors a month or two after that. The Canadians send out roses in about November or December and the U.S. venders anywhere from December through February. Then they close again for the year until the next year.

    That is also the timing cycle for roses in the local nurseries -- the roses are all delivered to them around December or January, and then they sell them, at first, for full price and then the prices progressively decrease as the season progresses. Anything at a nursery still now is something they are really hoping to sell quickly, and probably willing to discount significantly, just to get it out of the way for next year's deliveries. It's almost the same cycle as for the new car sellers.

    Fall, after the main heat of the summer has dissipated, is the best time for us to plant roses in Texas and California. So take a stroll through your local nurseries and see what is available, and take your iPad with you to look up pics of whatever you find, as they are likely to be blasted now after a hot Texas summer. You might be surprised.

  • mgleason56
    10 years ago

    I have to chime in here; Lyna, if you are interested I have an extra Grace Donnelly I could send you (free), but first take a look and see what you think of the coloring. Too garish for some. I am also willing to send you a Corpus Christi if you are so inclined. They are own root plants that are small, but bigger than bands. I am figuring the Corpus Christi just because that was where your grandmother had her first rose garden... I will not be offended if you decline, just a thought I had after reading these posts.

  • Holly Kline
    10 years ago

    I'm crazy about my Scentimental. I think the fragrance is amazing. I'm also a fan of my Oranges and Lemons (climber), and my Hypnotize.

    I love what you're doing and wish you and your grandmother lots of joy!

  • jerijen
    10 years ago

    Lyna -- I have bought well-grown roses in 5-G containers at Antique Rose Emporium, as late as the end of October. Of course, you have to BE there, but they do sell them. Chamblees may do the same thing, but I haven't been there. (I live in Southern California.)

    So, a jaunt there for the purpose of buying a few roses might work for you?

    They have a WONDERFUL Fall event. This year, November 1-3 in Independence.

    Location: Independence Display Gardens

    25th Annual Fall Festival of Roses

    Jeri

    Here is a link that might be useful: ARE Fall Festival of Roses

  • Kippy
    10 years ago

    My mom is 90 and I can totally relate to the desire for bigger now.

    Just last week the local nursery put climbers on sale and I picked a couple up (including a striped one) for only a few bucks more than bareroot. I would call around some local places and see if they have anything on your list.

    Purple Splash is LOVING life in our garden, if you have some space to fill at the back of a bed, I love her too. I think I could stretch our plant about 20'

    A side note, before you dig too much in that glass and junk, I would pick through it and remove the sharp stuff. Dad saved glass for his green house and the neighbors helped by tossing jars and beer bottles...we are constantly picking up bits of glass and shoveling in it only makes the bits smaller and smaller. We made a screen of 1/2" hardware cloth and spent a lot of time filtering through much of it looking for rusty metal and bits of glass.

  • Alwayzbgrateful
    Original Author
    10 years ago

    Jerijen, that is so cool! I had no idea ARE held such awesome events!!! I know grandma would just LOVE to go! (Myself included) Oh how I'd love to take her!!She's been down lately, She had a bad reaction a few days back to a new blood pressure med. Hopefully by then her Drs will have all the kinks worked out. My Uncle (the one w/ downs) has been having a blast showing her pics of diff roses and telling me how she wants everything done. He said
    its gotta be perfect for his momma! Im currently in contact with a local nursery to order a few yall recommened (like 4th of july) I really like scentimental, but I've read it doesn't have much scent and blooms then falls apart soon after. Has anyone experienced this? Also that some stripeys will bloom solid colors in different lighting and temps. Is that true? If so, how can I tell the ones that do apart from the ones that dont? Will they bloom solid the entire growing season or change colors throughout? Thank you all again, I cannot tell you how much it means to me that you are all willing to give me a helping hand and guide me through this !
    Eternally grateful,
    Lyna

  • kstrong
    10 years ago

    Even in my garden with most every stripe known, I don't want Scentimental. Have grown it. Hated it. One of the only striped roses I've ever intentionally "shovel-pruned."

    I live in a very cool, foggy, coastal climate where the temps rarely go above 80. Even here, the blooms were "fleeting." And I think the name "Scent" . . . imental was someone's idea of a marketing joke. Also little scent here.

    But I do know there are people who like it. Just not me. And it did get a big marketing push a few years back, so it's everywhere.

  • jerijen
    10 years ago

    I really DID like Scentimental. But I gotta admit (and I'm also here in the fogbank) those lovely blooms WERE fleeting. Where it once grew, there is now a Found rose whose blooms last far longer. Ah well ...

    But I still grow 'Fourth Of July,' and I always will.

    Jeri

  • Alwayzbgrateful
    Original Author
    10 years ago

    Thanx! That's exactly what i needed to know!

  • mourya82
    10 years ago

    Striped roses are unique in the world of roses.
    Pin stripes, bold stripes or splashes ��" they all enhance
    the beauty of a rose. The striped rose zebras make a
    beautiful and a bold statement in a garden, drawing
    your eyes toward them. The uncommon occurrence of
    stripes makes them more appealingtoa rosegardener

    Here is a link that might be useful: striped roses

  • Alwayzbgrateful
    Original Author
    10 years ago

    Racinrose, Ooooh I'm so jealous! ;-) I love ur roses!! I've seen both on all kinds of mail order sites.But I've also heard those varieties struggle with our blazing heat. Our seasons are summer and winter with VERY little in between. Anyone have success with Hybrid perp. Or bourbons in zone 8-10?
    BTW,Thank you for you kind words.I agree completely! They have SO much love, knowledge, experience to give! And all anyone has to do is accept it.Ain't Love grand!
    -Lyna

  • luis_pr
    10 years ago

    I bought Scentimental almost 10 years ago and it has survived all the hot summers we have had recently. Oranges and Lemons did not fare so well. I think it (O&L) lasted 1-2 years only.

    Be advised that if your weather is similar to mine, during July thru part of September, you may notice that the number of blooms will dimish significantly and that the color in the blooms will be almost always "wrong" until the temperatures come down from the 100s.

    During that stressful time, Scentimental has 1 to 1.5" blooms whose color is either only bright red or a dark shade of pink. I only see one bloom or two tops at a time. Sometimes they have stripes but very few. They may appear to be the wrong rose to people who have not seen this before.

    If your soil is as bad as you suggest, consider growing them in containers. It may help keep some of those the large shrubs' size in check a little.

    Take a trip to Antique Rose Emporium (call first to see if they have a good selection of striped roses) if you want to see before buying.

    I have not tried hybrid perpetuals here but I have seen Reve dâÂÂOr and Souvenir de St. Anne's for sale before in my area and have Souvenir del la Malmaison (shrub) and Zepherine de Drouhin. Those are not striped roses though. Reine des Violettes did not fare well as I did not like the shrub's structure.

    Here is more info:
    http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/rosesant/msg0217034631488.html?4

    Luis