SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
Houzz Logo Print
highalttransplant

'Autumn Joy' might be 'Neon'

highalttransplant
16 years ago

When I purchased some 'Autumn Joy' Sedum at a local nursery a few weeks ago they had some buds on them, but weren't blooming, so I couldn't see the bloom color. When the blooms opened up I thought they were a rather bright pink, but since I've never grown them, I thought maybe that was the way they were supposed to be. Now that the blooms are finishing up, they should be fading to that bronze/salmon color, but they don't seem to be doing that. The color scheme in my garden is autumn colors - reds, yellows, and oranges, so the bright pink really looks out of place. Am I being impatient or did they give me the 'Neon' Sedum by mistake? There was no tag in the pots when I bought them, so I was trusting the nursery worker to give me the right thing. Silly me!

Should I order replacements now, or wait until spring? Or does someone have some 'Autumn Joy' to trade?

Comments (33)

  • bean_counter_z4
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Autumn Joy is so easy to propogate, it's almost a shame to buy it. Wait till spring and ask a friend/neighbor to give you some cuttings (it should be cut back in May to promote good growth anyway). Bring the cuttings home and stick them in the gournd. They will grow and bloom the first season.

  • silvergold
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Mine are at the redish pink phase still - very bright. Here is a description I found online and a picture to match:
    Flower heads form in July and look like broccoli (flat corymbs). In August, the flowers start to color up, turning pink. Slowly the flowers turn red, and later in fall they turn a deeper rusty-red.

    Here is a link that might be useful: sedum autumn joy

  • Related Discussions

    What makes sedum 'Autumn Joy' dull in color?

    Q

    Comments (28)
    So, the next and most important question: Let's say I replace my Autumn Joy by buying a full price plant at a reputable local nursery (that's saying a lot for a frugal WS and swapper!). When I buy the plant it is blooming in a brilliant and delightful shade. Can that brilliant and delightful shade be a product of special nursery conditions, i.e. high amounts of a particular fertilizer, etc.? Can I depend on that color in my garden being close enough to what I saw in the nursery? Let me note that this morning I went out to look at one of my hardy mums blooming. Last year it was purchased and was a fairly common color up here, can't remember the name. It had petals that were pink on the edges and became lighter, to almost a white, as the petals moved inward to the center, which I believe was yellow. Now it still has the yellow center and the petals are a deep burgany. No, nothing reseeded. I have not had any burgandy mums as I don't like burgandy. This was also my first year to really notice spring as a gardener. I checked that bed everyday, watching as each of the plants broke ground. This plant did now show up from seed with the starter leaves, followed by true leaves. I emerged from its roots in the ground with the thicker stalks you see in a returning perennial. This mum reverted on its own to one of its parents. I have seen posters post this before, and many people have responded by saying it had to have been a seed and the poster just didn't know it. I know it with this one. It is the same plant. So, even though I don't think Autumn Joy will revert to anything different, I know it is possible for the plant to behave differently once in the garden. I appreciate all your thoughts and input!
    ...See More

    Why does my Sedum Autumn Joy look wilted?

    Q

    Comments (6)
    Thanks for the link! I guess there is a chance that they are not getting adequate drainage. I have a large planter that is attached to my house.. probably 10ft long by 3 ft wide. Its also 3-4 ft tall. It was already filled with dirt when we bought the house, so I have no idea how the drainage is down under that top layer. Maybe before I go planting more sedum (I have an order on the way) I should remove some of the soil and add a layer of gravel and some perlite or sand? What do you think? Thanks again! Kim
    ...See More

    Sedum Autumn Joy

    Q

    Comments (5)
    Anytime I have a plant with a hole in the middle I pretty much assume that it needs to be divided. Pinching is good too. Might also be that the soil is too rich or getting too much fertilizer. But as Primgal said, if they don't get enough sun they are going to flop. They want full sun (and not to be shaded by their neighbors either). I love this plant all year 'round, and have several big drifts of a dozen plants or more in several places around my garden. Bonus that the bees love it as much as I do. Good luck! Patti
    ...See More

    Will Autumn Joy recover from aphids?

    Q

    Comments (10)
    I never knew about cutting back sedums, Gazania! I just read about it on a few sites after your comment. But - if I cut them in half, there will be no foliage at all! Would the plant survive to make more branches if there are no leaves? Maybe some selective cutting of the outside stems? I can root the cuttings. Then if the outside stems re-branch, it will hide the bad legs in the center. (Love the username - found some Gazanias last year and loved them, but I didn't know their name until this month, so I couldn't look for more this year.) Last night I made an "aphid sprayer" out of an empty organic cleaner bottle. I put a squirt of soap in the water and went to work throughly soaking the top and bottom of every darned leaf. I think the other watering-can treatments didn't cover the undersides of leaves well enough, leaving some aphids alive. Maryanne, thank you so much for your generous offer. I will keep that in mind if I lose the battle. --Tracy
    ...See More
  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Here is a picture when it was first planted and another taken a couple days ago.

    {{gwi:276583}}

    {{gwi:276585}}

    Can anyone tell me which one I have?

  • justmetoo
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    You can compare Sedum Neon with Sedum Autumn Fire (very similar to Autumn Joy, smaller and more compact though) on Walter's Garden. Can't leave link, sorry. Google Walter's Garden then in database go under 's' and there are photos. In the additinal photos of Neon sets Autumn Fire--you can see this also in additional photos of Autumn Fire which has Neon sitting next to it. Best photo I've seen to show an actual compare shot.

    Neon is a smaller plant than Autumn Joy. I actually prefer Autumn Fire to Autumn Joy. My Autumn Fire are just beginning to now think about going into the 'reddish' stage.

    Just my opinion, but I don't think your photo above is 'pink' enough for Neon but than photos online are hard to tell. Is your photo a true to 'in person' color?

  • leslie197
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I can't tell you which one you have either. I do not have any Neons, but have lots of Autumn Joy. From your picture I would assume yours is AJ at least until you have seen it go through several cycles. The rosy color is not all that unusual for AJ and the blooms can vary somewhat from year to year. The sequences of color and the length each one lasts seems to vary a bit with weather conditions and sun/shade conditions. I thought all my AJs (old, old, old ones) were more rose this year than usual.

    Here is a picture of one of my Sedum Autumn Joy taken 9/19/06. The color is quite accurate. It was a softer pink earlier in the season and is only now getting darker in October. Foliage color on all my AJs were lighter and more yellow green than usual. In addition both bloomtime and the color changes started a good three weeks later on my sedums this year than usual for me. I have no idea why, except we had rain, then a five week period with no rain, then way too much rain and cooler temps (10 degrees lower than normal for over a month).

    {{gwi:276587}}



    This picture was taken on the exact same day as the other one except in 2004 (9/19/04) and as you can see it has already turned the brick red color. (I have many other photos of AJ taken through the years showing this deep brick red color in mid-September - but picked this one because of the matching dates and because it's so pretty :~) Lots of my photos are kind of plain specimen pictures, like the 1st photo above, that I take for my garden maps.)

    {{gwi:276589}}

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Leslie - I think mine must be 'Autumn Joy' then, because your picture looks exactly like a larger version of mine, based on your first photo. Maybe mine is changing colors late since it was transplanted so late in the summer (about 4 or 5 weeks ago). I was hoping the bloom color would be more rose than pink, but I guess I will wait and see what it does next year.

    justmetoo: What is it that you like better about the 'Autumn Fire'? This is my first time to try sedums, but am told that they will do well here. I also have a couple of 'Dragon's Blood', but they are not doing all that great. They are getting too much water right now, as we recently put in sod and have to run the sprinklers quite a bit more than normal. The beds are on a drip system, but the yard sprinklers overspray that area a little, and the sedums are not happy about that :)

  • justmetoo
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    (Nice photo Leslie, I always enjoy your photos, things always look so nice)

    As far as my thoughts on Autumn Fire, in my opinion, I think the stems on Autumn Fire are sturdier and hold up better as the season progresses than Autumn Joy and that the blooms maintain their quality for a longer time. Autumn Joy has a tendency to be a bit more open and not as compact, though some have posted that they pinch back Autumn Joy earlier in the season and divide every few years which seems to help the opening up habit of Autumn Joy. Also soil and amount of sun can also effect the plants.

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Are there any differences in bloom or foilage color?

  • justmetoo
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Foilage color, no. Bloom ? Not really. Sitting side by side in a nursery one would probably not notice any difference between the two plants. I think the blooms on Autumn Fire hold their colors longer. If I didn't have both in my garden I probably would not have a prefence between the two. The Autumn Joy colors for me goes down hill quicker after peak bloom faster than Autumn Fire does.

    There is Sedum "Matrona" if you are looking for a different foilage mixture. I also like Bertram Anderson, which blooms earlier, though I have a lot of dark foilage in my gardens which may not be what you like in yours.

    For fall though, Autumn Fire is my choice. I've not replaced my Autumn Joy, I have both. I think if you give your Autumn Joy a couple seasons to get going, it'll grow on you.

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Here is a picture of the plant today, and it is not looking like any pictures I have ever seen of 'Autumn Joy'. The foliage is turning yellow with pink around the leaf edges, and the spent blooms are not turning the colors they are supposed to. Has anyone seen one like this, or had their 'Autumn Joy' turn these colors?

    After seeing so many photos of the gorgeous colors they turn in the fall, I am very disappointed in mine, and still wonder if they were tagged incorrectly at the nursery.

    {{gwi:276591}}

  • franeli
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    By the end of Oct. in Z4, 'Autumn Joy' turns deep burgundy and the leaves yellow in preparation of falling off for the winter. It mimics the autumnal landscape here in NewEngland.
    I think it is stunning and like the wonderful photo by leslie197, the now burgundy domes look great with the grass backdrop!
    Perhaps once your small plant increases in size, the mass effect of the burgundy domes in late Oct. will be more appealing...it is the absolute end to the garden year now in Z4.

  • leslie197
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Just for comparison - here's another picture of the same clump of Sedum Autumn Joy (first picture on my previous post). It was taken in the last couple of days. Stalk foliage is more yellow and the flower color is getting a bit deeper and less rosy. Color will keep flattening out to a dark rust and most of the foliage will disappear as we get harsher weather (already had a couple of snow squalls here).

    {{gwi:276593}}

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Leslie: I think what disappoints me, is that mine went from the pink color in your first photo, to the blah color in my last photo, without ever turning that gorgeous brick color like in your second photo in your Oct. 4th post.

    That brick color was the reason I purchased it in the first place. I just planted some Achillea 'Walter Funke' that also claims to bloom a brick color. I'll have to report back next summer on that one.

    Most everything I've planted is supposed to have red, orange, gold, or yellow blooms... so I'm afraid the pink on the 'Autumn Joy' will look out of place. I did plant Echinacea 'Summer Sky' which has petals that are peachy-pink, so maybe if I move the 'Autumn Joy' in front of them in the spring it would look okay. Though I do have the "Karl Foerster' behind it now, like you do, and I really like the way yours looks.

  • leslie197
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I don't know what could have made your sedum AJ change so quickly. Mine (at least 8 years old) always change very slowly over a long period of time, looking like green cabbage or broccoli, then gradually becoming a very soft pink, then a rosier pink, then a deeper rose with yellowish foliage, then brick red, and then darker and flatter, until a deep brown rust on bare stems, which hold snow on top and stay upright (unless covered up completely) with some stems and dried flower heads still standing until spring.

    Perhaps it got too cold too fast and the plant wasn't developed enough this year to withstand the changes. The only problem I ever have with AJ is with rot, which can quickly age the flowering plant down to what you have, or I may just find it folded over & dead on the ground. The parts not as badly effected can look like yours.

    The rot, however, is easy to see, so I think you would know if that were the problem. The only solution to the rot problem is to raise the plants higher. I scoop out the survivors, add some lite potting soil and grit to the area, making the planting area a couple of inches higher, and replant.

    As for the color problem, AJ is often mentioned in garden books as being hard to site because of the brick red color, but the real problem I think is the constantly changing color! Here is a picture of AJ actually in bloom, a very soft pink color which works with most anything, but doesn't last more than a week or two. BTW, this clump has declined in size as the Montgomery Blue Spruce (not seen this time) on the other size has gotten bigger and bigger. The grass is Overdam, a dwarf feather reed grass, which looks kind of small against the rather tall AJ.

    The grass & the sedum still look great together, although I think your Karl Forster would be better proportioned, and great with the Blue Spruce. There are also 2 Crimson Pygmy Barberries in this combo which helps the various colors of the sedum pop. (This complete combo is then repeated on the other side of the 2nd of 3 Crusader Hawthorns).

    In addition, the garden on the back side of the grass path has clumps of deep red daylilies between the shrubs, followed by pink daylilies in the center, followed by yellow & orange daylilies in the far corner, all underplanted with perennial geraniums and sedges . So although I use gold, blue, & red foliage plants with the sedum, the nearby flowers can be any color!

    {{gwi:208745}}

    I think you will like the Achillea. They look great with Lilies and Daylilies, along with many other plants. Just love their flattish flowerheads for contrast and they come in so many colors. (They also like it dryish - so I have to watch for rot here too). I have never tried Walter Funke but use both Paprika and Fireland, one is more clear red and one is more brick red, I can't remember which is which. However, they both start off reddish and then like the AJ change colors. Other yarrows I have such as Moonbeam & Cerise Queen darken but do not change so completely in color. Here is Paprika or Fireland, no longer red!
    {{gwi:276595}}

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Great picture of the yarrow, Leslie. I always love your pictures!

    For most of the summer we had nothing but a dirt yard, and I had plenty of time to research what would tolerate the dry heat of our summer, and still be cold hardy too (just so you don't think I have TOO much free time, I was also taking care of a newborn girl, and two other children, LOL). I also tried to pick things of varying heights and colors that would look good with our red stucco house. However, since everything got planted in August or later, I'll just have to wait until next summer to see how it all turns out. It's like someone giving you a Christmas present and telling you to wait 6 or 8 months to open it : )

    Actually, I'll probably have to wait 2 or 3 years for my garden to have that filled in look that yours has. Here is a photo of the house, though from this distance it looks like there is nothing in the flower beds, there are over 50 plants there, they are just REALLY small right now!

    {{gwi:31014}}

    {{gwi:276596}}

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Sorry I got a little off topic there, but back to the AJ issue. It's because they skipped the brick red phase that leads me to believe they are actually 'Neon' instead. I've heard several posters say that it just turns a dark "blah" color after blooming, which is what mine did.

    I'll give it another year, but it may get replaced if it doesn't impress me any better next time.

  • whimsicalbee
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    How exiting to have a new home to landscape! I really like the colors, and the different materials that were used. I'm sure you're having lots of fun designing your gardens. Lovely Home! :)

    I also just bought 'Neon' Sedum but it looks just like my 'Autumn Joy'... both have that late brick color right now. The only difference I see is the 'Neon' leaves are a little darker green, but we'll see how it looks once it's been growing in the garden.

    Leslie, I have also really enjoyed looking at your garden pictures! So neat and beautiful, and I've added a couple more plants to my "Wish List" LOL... Variegated Dogwood, that little silver blue evergreen you have there, the ornamental grass and 'Paprika' Achillea. :)

  • leslie197
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Highalttransplant,

    In no time at all you will have a lush garden. It will take awhile for the trees and woody shrubs, but the perennials and grasses will take off quickly. Your house and garden beds look well thought out, and the mountains provide a wonderful setting.

    Looking at your house color I can see why you have concerns about the color of AJ. Your house has a very strong color against which to grow a garden, but I think it would be great fun to do. Once you have a backdrop of lush greens around the property, you will also find that it is easier to use other colors.

    FWIW, I would pick a lot of the colors from the stone wall. BTW, it is quite lovely! The warm greys and tans (also in the wood siding), as well as the blue & copper tones will work wonderfully well with the wall color and contrast well enough to be seen from a distance.

    Think some warm bronze and reddish foliage, along with the silvery touches of something like Lamb's Ears and the blue-greens of iris foliage & fescue grasses, backed by strong dark green and highlighted with the deep & brick reds, yellows, and golds of the flowers you planted. Also add some touches of cream and off white flowers against the wall and you have a yummy color scheme.

    BTW, I would still use a lot of sedums in your landscape both because it suits your climate and because it offers a strong contrast to other perennial and grasses and quite a bit of structure. A good clump of sturdy stiff AJ (or Matrona for example) is almost like planting a small evergreen shrub in the border. And it will grow quicker than a shrub. You can remove or reduce the sedums once your shrubs start filling in if you wish.

    Also the changing colors of the sedum flowers won't clash as much once you have green in the garden and if you put them some distance from the walls - then they become a color echo. Your eye will read them redder and more coordinating. A big patch out by the end of your walkway, for example, would mark the entrance well.

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Thanks for all of your input Leslie! I am thankful to get advice from someone that has such a good eye for gardening.

    At our last house, the people before us had planted only pinks and purples, which I grew tired of, and was gradually replacing with bolder colors. So my original plan was bright reds and yellows here, but now I am hoping the reds that I have selected will be more of an orangish red and not a bluish red. I'm also thinking I should have gone with more cream colored flowers and pale yellows instead of the brighter gold tones. I do have echinacea 'Sunrise', which is a creme color, and coreopsis 'Creme Brulee' , and a dianthus which are supposed to bloom a pale yellow. However, the coreopsis 'Sunburst' is a bright gold, as is the gaillardia 'Goblin', the echinacea 'Harvest Moon', and the solidago 'Fireworks'.

    I planted a ninebark 'Coppertina' out near the street (doesn't show up in the picture, it's in the left corner of the yard), but I like the idea of something with copper foliage nearer to the house. Any suggestions?

    I also think you're right about the blue green of the fescues looking good with the house color, though I'm not sure about where in the bed to put them. Are they short enough to go in the front, or would they need to be in the middle? If the 'Northern Lights' grasses that I planted along the walkway don't survive the winter, I could put the fescue there.

    Those mums were more of a rust color when I planted them, but turned kind of burgandy as the weather got cool. I hope they return to their original color next summer, that is if they make it through the winter.

    There were some 'Dragon's Blood' Sedum at the ends of the walkway flowerbeds, but they were getting drowned by the sprinklers when the sod was planted, so I put them in pots on the porch for now. They too have turned more burgandy, but I really like them.

    Your input has been very helpful, Leslie, thank you so much for your suggestions!

  • mmqchdygg
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Talk to me about this cutting back thing...Would dividing it serve the same purpose, or do you actually need to cut it to the ground rather than divide?

  • leslie197
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Highalttransplant,

    You've got lots of time to play around with flowers and all sorts of color combos. One thing you might consider adding are some daylilies, possibly cream with red or purplish eyes.

    From my cream and purple garden - Border Lord, the darker tannish one with dark eye, & Moonlit Masquerade the whiter one with purple eye. There are many, many other possible choices that would work. (Solid deep Purple is Bela Lugosi in back and Indian Giver to the right).

    {{gwi:251744}}


    Custard Candy
    {{gwi:276599}}



    Awakening Dream

    {{gwi:276601}}


    Elegant Candy with Sundown Echinacea. This kind of combo would not work up close to your house, the colors would not pop against the red, but it could possibly be used out in the yard somewhere. P.S. EC varies from pink to peach to quite orangish. Note also that the silver foliage of the Cerastium tomentosum, Snow-in-Summer, makes the green come alive.

    {{gwi:276603}}



    BTW, I interplanted 4 different new color echinaceas with Blue fescue grasses in my "dry" bed since I wasn't sure of the colors of the coneflowers. Here is one of the fescues a little later in the season in bloom. This is a 1st year fescue, so a bit undersized, but they never get very big in my wet yard. Yours might, but they are not huge grasses - I usually use 3 at a time, in drier condition you might be able to use one in place of my 3.

    {{gwi:276604}}



    You could also add some heucheras, lots of new colors, if you haven't already. Here is Peach Flambe Heuchera in its fall color - sorry, don't have a summer picture. More orangish/peach in summer. Here it is underplanting a blue spruce.

    {{gwi:256026}}


    Caramel Heuchera - more vigorous than Amber Waves or Peach Melba. Combined with a really dwarf Mugo pine called "Mops" - a nice deep green.
    {{gwi:208478}}

    Green Spice Heuchera - a green one with a blue cast - very vigorous, but there are also some great silvery ones that would work too, especially against your red.
    {{gwi:225200}}

    The small shrubs to the left of the bright yellow First Light Helianthus is Goldflame Spirea - it is orangish in spring and fall, green in summer. (So so pink flowers in early summer). Spireas come in lots of colors and some size variation. Goldflame is a 3 x 3 ft relatively cheap deciduous shrub that can be used as a cutback shrub as it is here.
    {{gwi:276605}}



    Since you already have Coppertina, here is my Diablo Physocarpus - it is a very deep purple-brown which would contrast nicely with your red, but be a bit on the dark side. If Coppertina matches well, you cold move it nearer the house and plant this one out in the yard.

    However, you might also try a Cotinus (I have Royal Purple) but there is a new variety called Grace which starts out purplish but has quite blue leaves in the summer. I saw it and it's gorgeous.

    Other possibilities are Sand Cherries (bright reddish leaves - short lived open shrub/tree) or barberries in red or gold colors, or Wiegela (some purplish-leafed ones), or dark leafed cannas or dahlias.

    {{gwi:276607}}

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Those lilies are beautiful! I've been considering some, but the cost has been one factor, the other is a height issue. How tall do yours get? I'm afraid they would have to go at the back of the bed, as most reach 4' or more. Also, how much water do they need? Most of the things I've planted will tolerate dry conditions, but I was thinking they liked a good bit of moisture.

    Love, love, love the heucheras! I had planned on getting some, but was discouraged on another thread as they would be in a west facing bed and was told they would fry with the late afternoon sun. I almost bought the 'Peach Flambe' anyway, LOL, but they were sold out by then. Don't the more colorful ones tolerate more sun than the silver ones?

    Spireas, we had at our last home, not sure what type, but they would get pretty big if not pruned regularly. IMO their flower color didn't seem to match their foliage, but they did have nice fall color.

    I will do some research on those other shrubs you mentioned. Are there any perennials, other than the heucheras that have that beautiful foliage and will tolerate full sun?

  • leslie197
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Daylilies have a range of heights. I have a whole bed around my patio of 14-20 inch tall daylilies. I have larger ones out in the yard, mostly in the 24-28 or 30 inch range. Sometimes the flowers may be a bit taller than that. The only 4 ft tall ones I have are ditch daylilies (hemerocallis fulva) and Autumn Minaret, a late summer one that can grow over 5 ft.

    There are so many varieties of DLs that you can just pick and choose the height you want. BTW the term miniature in daylilies refers to the size of the bloom, not the size of the plant, so you do have to be careful. (Miniatures have blooms under 3 inches wide).

    Most of my DLs bloom in the month of July, with a few in late June and a few in early August, but only a bit of rebloom on a couple here & there. This is fairly typical for cold areas. I try to stagger bloom times by buying Early, Mid, & Late DLs & have a few Very Lates. Each plant blooms from 2 to 4 or 5 weeks at most (depending on the variety and the size).

    Also once they are established DLs are quite drought tolerant. Along with their fibrous roots, daylilies create tuberous roots to absorb water and minerals and serve as energy storehouses. You will have no problem growing them in a west facing garden.

    Cost should not be a problem either, as you can buy them as cheaply as $4-10 a fan (usually a double fan). Most people on the forum buy from Mail Order or Online Catalogs. It takes a few years to grow a mature daylily from one double fan, but they sometimes bloom in the 1st year, and almost always bloom for me in the 2nd year. It is also possible to buy DLs at good local nurseries for around $12-15 that often have 2 or 3 double fans. These quickly make good-sized clumps. As with anything you can also spend hundreds of dollars for a single fan of something newly introduced.

    I have attached a link to the AHS. If you check the Popularity Polls link (located on the home page) for your region, you'll get a list of good ones to grow in the Colorado area. I own most of these from your region here in my Zone 5 Michigan, so checkout the other cold zones too!

    I would also suggest that if you want inexpensive small daylilies that can take the cold that you might try checking for the Siloam series (named for the hybridizer, Pauline Henry's, home town). She created many lovely small ones that are hardy and very inexpensive now. Marietta Gardens, a good source, has many Siloams. Local nurseries will have some of the more well known older varieties that are often on the Popularity Polls.
    BTW, I tuck many of my heucheras into the DL patch (my garden faces due South), so they get a bit of shade from the DL fronds & I like the contrast in foliage and color. Caramel and Peach Flambe are planted with no protection from the sun and have done fine for me. My lime colored ones (Lime Rickey & Key Lime Pie)like a bit of DL fronds to keep them from burning. My purples & silvery ones are mostly in the DL beds or along the East side of the house (morning sun only).

    Small Daylilies in the Patio Bed (Siloam David Kirchoff & Dragon's Eye) with Achillea Cerise Queen, early blooming garden mums, Sedum AJ (still green)and hardy LA Hybrid Lily stalks (past bloom). Front edge is underplanted with Dianthus Firewitch and Heuchera 'Amethyst Mist, Pewter Veil & Silver Scrolls. Whole bed is underplanted with crocus, iris reticulata, species tulips and hyacinths.
    {{gwi:254976}}

    Tall side of same bed - Daylilies (slightly taller DLs -double pink one is Siloam Double Classic & deeper peach/copper one is Smoky Mtn. Autumn, purplish one is Alpine Mist), with Catmint Walker's Low, Achillea Fireland, underplanted with lime heucheras at front edge, & also interplanted (not shown) with Knautia Madedonica and Gaura Whirling Butterflies.

    {{gwi:28213}}

    All the mentioned above plants would do well in your garden and climate. Knauta, catmint, gaura, sedums, & achilleas all like it somewhat dry as do bulbs in the off season. Most come in many colors. The bed also has May Night & Caradonna Salvias which appreciate it dry as well and provide good dark blues.

    Here is a link that might be useful: American Hemerocallis Society

  • franeli
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    leslie197,
    thanks for the inspiration!
    great photos...I've written your combos into my garden journal.
    i think even in Z4, i can use some of your ideas to improve my daylily and perennial garden!

  • silvergold
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Regarding the daylilies - your awakening dream caught my eye. I used to have this one. But a couple of winters ago I lost all my evergreen daylilies including this one. The odd thing is that it was a very mild winter, but dry with very little snow cover. Just one thing to be careful of in Z4. Seme-evergreen seems to do ok here, and of course dormant. Very nice pictures!!

  • leslie197
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Good point Silvergold! I bought Awakening Dream locally and didn't even know it was evergreen (nothing on the tag about it) until I brought it home and started entering info from the internet into my spreadsheet.

    I started with only dormants and now have some semi-evergreens and just 2 other evergreen ones (both bonuses from Maryott). So far they have all overwintered, but overwintering evergreens can certainly be a problem, so thanks again Silvergold for bringing up this issue.

    BTW, for those who do not know, Daylilies come in 3 "foliage habits", Dormant, Semi-dormant, & Evergreen, usually noted in catalogs as D, SEV, or E. Explanations of these 3 terms can be found on the AHS site but refer primarily to foliage traits and not specifically hardiness. That said, almost all dormants are hardy in the cold zones, as well as many semi-evergreens, and some(or few??) evergreens. In the cold zones it is a good idea to check for hardiness of evergreen DLs by asking people in your zone about their success with various ones.

    Also thanks Silvergold and Franeli for your compliments on the pictures. I really appreciate it. Franeli, have fun with your combos and doublecheck the zone info! I'm kind of careless with zone stuff since I can grow zone 5 & some zone 6 plants, if I can control the drainage issues well enough. It is the freeze/thaw, wet heavy clay soils, and inconsistent snow cover, that does in my plants.

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Leslie: Thanks for the AHS link. There's a lot of great information there. Can you suggest an inexpensive mail order company for daylilies? Klem's Song had a pretty good selection, but they ranged in price from $15 - 40 each, which is a little more than I would like to spend. I'm probably too late to plant any this year anyway, but that gives me all winter to figure out which ones to plant, LOL.

    Also, is your 'Peach Flambe' Heuchera in full sun, or shade? I REALLY want one of those, but I will try to restrain myself if it is simply not going to survive in my southwest/west facing garden : ) Maybe when my shrubs get bigger I can give it some protection.

  • silvergold
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    highalttransplant, I've ordered quite a few from homestead farms - they were very nice plants. Also ensata.

    Here is a link that might be useful: homestead farms

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    WOW!!! Thank you SO much silvergold! I could spend hours browsing that online catalog. I think I better get another cup of coffee, I might be here awhile, LOL.

  • leslie197
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Highalttransplant,

    West facing beds can be a problem, but less so in zone 4 or 5 than down South. Remember that a west facing bed will actually have north and south ends. If it is an island bed (not along the side of your home) it will also have an east side. You will have less sun at the north end than the south end of your garden and only morning sun on the east side.

    You can also plant part shade plants on the north side of any taller shrub or perennial to give them some shade. As your garden gets full (mine's crammed!) nothing is in full sun anymore - every plant competes with its neighbor for sunlight, just as it does for root space, water and nutrients.

    As you continue gardening you will find that there are lots of places to tuck in part shade & shade plants, although that may not seem possible when your garden is so new and open. You will also learn to create/find/adapt to little microclimates on your property. Half the fun is experimenting - if you want the heucheras, my advice is try em - you can always move them around until you find the perfect spot, maybe on the north side of a tall grass. Vines can provide a lot of shade too. You'll come up with something that works.

    My Peach Flambes are in my south facing backyard garden but on the north side edge of a long island bed. There are in a curving line in front of a small Mugo pine, Strawberry Candy daylily, a small Blue Spruce, and then 2 Crimson Pygmy Barberries as you move to the west. You can just barely see some of them getting some early afternoon shade from the little tree and the denser shrubs as the sun moves east to west across the sky.
    {{gwi:258054}}

    P.S. Marietta Gardens is a reliable daylily source with plenty of inexpensive daylilies and lots of Siloams. Click on General Price List with Pictures.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Marietta Gardens

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Thanks Leslie for the Marietta Gardens link. I spent quite a bit of time there, making a wish list and I only got through the letter D, LOL!

    Back to the topic of my 'Autumn Joy?' Yesterday I was looking out the window and noticed something amiss. Two of the sedums were fine, but one was missing its seed heads. They were definately there the day before, because I had been out there doing a little weeding. What would have eaten them?

    {{gwi:276608}}

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I had to bring this post back, as I solved this mystery quite by accident today.

    While stopping by my local garden center to pick up some supplies, I noticed a display of sedums in bloom. BTW, this is the same place that I purchased the plants in question last year. There were two kinds, 'Autumn Joy' and 'Neon'. The 'Autumn Joy' was a deep rosy red, and the 'Neon' was an almost violet color, really more purple than pink to me. The 'Neon' bloom color was identical to the ones blooming in my garden right now.

    Unfortunately, this is the fourth time this past year that a plant I purchased ended up not being the selection that was sold to me. Even though the plants are healthy, and the blooms quite pretty, it just doesn't fit in with the color scheme I am trying to achieve. Since it is in bloom, I suppose I will have to swap them out in the spring, then wait another year or two for the new ones to fill out. The owner didn't offer to let me trade for the correct item, which was a bit disappointing.

    My computer had to be rebuilt due to a virus, and my photo software hasn't been reloaded yet, but as soon as it is, I will post a current picture.

  • highalttransplant
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Oh, and the other mystery, about who ate the seed heads was solved too ... the deer.