FIND PROFESSIONALS
SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
gardenfanatic2003

Dumb question about hoses

gardenfanatic2003
10 years ago

I've never noticed before that there are different sizes of hoses - 1/2", 3/4", 5/8", etc. The 1/2" are cheaper, but I don't want to spend $30 on a hose and then wish I had gotten something different.

What makes one size preferable over another?

Also - a 50 foot is definitely too short. I'm trying to decide between 75 foot and 100. Any thoughts?

Deanna

Comments (29)

  • ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5
    10 years ago

    i see you are fixated on hose today.. lol

    no 100 footer.. you will regret how heavy it is to lug around..

    if you need 100 feet.. get two 50's ... gives you many more options ....

    width is a function of pressure .. are you well or city water ..

    the thinner the hose.. the more pressure it takes to move the water over distance .. because of the resistance of the hose wall .. so at 100 feet.. a wider hose itself might be better ..

    i had a post.. about an option to long hoses.. and the title is escaping me right now.. if and when i think of it.. or someone else knows which.. i will link it for you

    the only dumb question.. is the UNasked question.. in my book ...

    ken

    Here is a link that might be useful: cant believe i found it

  • gardenfanatic2003
    Original Author
    10 years ago

    I'm on city water. And you're right, I'm fixated on the whole watering thing cuz I know it's going to be a bad summer, and I'm trying to get it all figured out before everything is wilted and dying!

    I do remember that post. Not being a handy(wo)man, that system isn't a viable option for me. I recall mentioning something about you coming to Missouri to rig it up for me? lol

    Deanna

  • Related Discussions

    Dumb question about hot water fillers & pot fillers

    Q

    Comments (7)
    The house we are renovating had a hot water tap at the sink. I was impressed. I'm a tea drinker, and it made it so easy. I also used it to clean a pot or pan, sort of a squirt of the very hot water to sanitize it. Of course I only used it one weekend we stayed at the house before demo. I took it out and didnt replace it for two reasons. One, even though we have well water, i prefer to drink (and make tea with) spring water. Two, my sink has two faucets , a soap and a sprayer. Thats a lot of bling already. Pot fillers. I put one in the kitchen in my old house 8-9 years ago. Loved it, could not do without it. If only you could drain the water too.
    ...See More

    Really dumb questions about tomatoes and herbicide

    Q

    Comments (9)
    Strange situation. How long ago was this herbicide applied? These could be nothing more that reseeded plants from fruit that was on the original. In other words the original was killed and what you see now is new plants that sprouted from the seeds that fell to the ground. So eat them with no worries. Otherwise how much was applied? The stuff is normally totally lethal to tomato plants so if this was a recent application and the plant is still growing then I agree with Dan that either much was not absorbed, or it was not applied properly, or the product was way outdated. Otherwise the plant would be dead. No question about it. So eat them with no worries. Which begs the question, if you wanted to kill it in the first place why would you want to keep it alive to eat the fruit now? Dave
    ...See More

    Dumb question about acorns

    Q

    Comments (2)
    Are you observing the male catkins or the female structure? I ask because the pistillate flowers are tiny and unknown to most. Anyway, if oak is too young, the female flowers won't fully form or the ovaries will abort fertilized eggs. Sexually mature oaks will bear as only as many acorns as the tree can physiologically support and will abort the excess.
    ...See More

    Really dumb question about Phildendron Brasil

    Q

    Comments (3)
    You can get your second plant by taking a cutting off your current plant. If your weather is suitable you could give the plant some time outside.
    ...See More
  • Bumblebeez SC Zone 7
    10 years ago

    I would get two fifty foot hoses too and get the ones that say most durable. Don't get anything that says light or middle weight.
    I stupidly bought one of those earlier this spring and returned it the next day and that was a hassle. Just dragging it on the driveway wore holes in it immediately and it sprang water the first time I used it. Total junk.
    It was middle weight.

    The hose I ended up buying was about $35-$40 and I looked at a lot of hoses first. You have to pay a certain amount to get something that will last.

    I also have a bunch of hoses that have lasted but, uhmmm, I have ruined a few by driving on them and crushing the brass part. Don't do that.

  • gardenweed_z6a
    10 years ago

    I always go with 5/8" because I want the most water at the fastest rate to minimize watering time. Fifty feet is the best for my needs as well since I try to use well water as efficiently as possible plus my hose reel won't hold more than that. I place recycled milk & cat litter jugs as close to the base of my plants as possible, then fill them with water. The jugs have a pinhole--just a push pin--an inch from the bottom where the water comes out in a thin stream right at the base of the plant so none is wasted on foliage or mulch. Plants get a good, gentle soaking and the water that remains in the jug once the level falls below the pinhole keeps the jugs from blowing around if it's windy. It may not be aesthetically pleasing but it's my poor man's irrigation system--it kept all my perennials alive through the 2010 drought.

  • ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5
    10 years ago

    flexogen are the best

    ken

    Here is a link that might be useful: and a pretty color

  • denninmi
    10 years ago

    Actually, I would recommend Craftsman brand hoses from Sears. Most of them, except for some of the cheaper vinyl ones, carry a lifetime warranty for residential use, so if they go bad, just take back to Sears for a free replacement (assuming, of course, Sears and their Craftsman brand continue to exist in the future, not a sure thing at all at this time).

  • terrene
    10 years ago

    How big is your lot? It partly depends on how far you have to stretch them and how strong you are to lug them around.

    My hoses are all 5/8 inch. I have two 75 foot hoses and one 100. This lot is shaped like a long rectangle, and I sometimes burn brush in the way back and need about 175-200 ft of hose to reach there. The 75 footers more or less reach the front corners, but they can be put together for extra reach.

    The 75 footers are vinyl (plastic?) and the 100 foot is rubber. I like rubber better, it's more flexible, but it's a little heavier. But the black rubber kind of rubs off on your hands. The longer hoses aren't that heavy to move around if the water pressure is released and they drain.

    If you're having a dry spell, a deep mulch can be really helpful!

  • calistoga_al ca 15 usda 9
    10 years ago

    I solved the hose problem years ago. I have pipes everywhere with plenty of standpipes and hose bibs. I never need longer than a fifty foot hose. Whenever a grandson visits, I simply mark the spot and take the truck to get the pipe needed. Digging ditches is wonderful exercise for young men. Al

  • Tiffany, purpleinopp Z8b Opp, AL
    10 years ago

    For some reason, the last few hoses I bought didn't have rubber O-rings in them, so you might want to check and grab a pack of them if you are not sure. Sometimes when you connect 2 hoses, 2 rubber rings are needed to get a tight seal. I also think 2 50-ft. hoses are better than 1 100 ft. hose. If something goes wrong, it only happens to half.

    I think people overlook the importance of storage in regard to longevity of their hoses. When you roll it up, make sure there aren't any kinks or holes which can become more permanent if the hose sits that way for a few days. Those kinks make weak spots which develop into holes. IME, rubber kinks a lot less.

    About 10 years ago, I got some of those fabric firefighter-type hoses and they were garbage! Don't waste your money on those, unless you get some testimonials from people who have tried them lately. Hopefully they've improved. Mine didn't last a whole season before springing leaks!

  • Bumblebeez SC Zone 7
    10 years ago

    The last hose I bought, a few weeks ago, was a flexogen. It was $20 for 75 feet and heavy duty, 5/8" - as all my hoses are. It seems to be a good hose that will last. The $35-40 hose I bought about 6 weeks ago was from Lowes and 100 feet.
    I don't remember the make but it also seems to be a keeper.
    In a moment of optimism, I taped the receipts to the cardboard labels to save in case.

  • terrene
    10 years ago

    Just wanted to add that my 100 foot black rubber hose is a Craftsman hose and it is great! It is much less likely to get those weak kinky spots that the vinyl hoses get. Also it is very durable, and mine is at least 5 years old and still in great shape.

    Don't know about the Flexagon hoses, they might be good too. But you never really know about a product until it stands the test of time.

    Also, don't forget to turn the water off and relieve the pressure in the hose when you're not using it because it's not good for the hose. I always drain and bring the hoses in for the winter, but at least one hose stays out a little longer than it probably should through a few freezes. This is because the gutters need their final cleaning after the leaves fall (mid-late November).

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    10 years ago

    I also have a Craftsman rubber hose and we have had it for a very very long time. I couldn't tell you the length or the diameter, but I have to have at least 100 ft, maybe 150 ft on the back and probably 50ft in the front. It is a heavy hose no doubt about it, but it's better than going to a a gym. (g) And we bought two hose reels that are powered by water at a 50% off sale one fall. I love them. You flip a switch and the hose rewinds itself. We've had them for 2 years and they are still working. The hose(s) itself might be over 20 years old? Never been repaired. There is only one drawback and that is it is black and if it rubs up against a pot or the leg of a chair, it leaves a black mark. So I use a lot of hose guides. But, I would buy them again. You learn how to avoid rubbing against things.

  • NHBabs z4b-5a NH
    10 years ago

    I just wanted to add that if you run over the hose end and bend the brass part or run over the hose with the lawn mower (both of which have happened in my house), you can get replacement ends for hoses. If the hose is in good condition other than the end problem, it's well worth taking the time to do the repair.

  • singleton165
    9 years ago

    My vote goes for the Craftsman rubber hoses as well, I've had some since the early 90's and they still work great (ugh! Guess I just dated myself!).
    LOL NHBabs...those replacement ends are great for mistakes, aren't they? Easy to install too. :)

    Ken, those Flexogen look nice...maybe I'll try one if I ever need a new hose.

  • ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5
    9 years ago

    i was a craftsman man..

    until they closed my sears.. and the closest one is in toledo 45 miles away ...

    so.. a free replacement.. will cost me more in gas to go get it.. than most of the stuff is worth..

    whats that all about ...

    ken

  • kittymoonbeam
    9 years ago

    I have a heavy duty hose that connects to a lighter duty hose and it makes it easier for me to move around with it because a 100+ foot heavy duty hose is heavy for me. It saves money too only having to replace the lighter one at the end. The only drawback to the heavy duty hoses are you can do some significant damage to pansies, etc. if you're not careful.

  • thisismelissa
    9 years ago

    One thing to consider about hoses is how you'd repair them, if necessary.

    We have one that's 3/4"... it's a great hose, but our dang tree rats concurred with that and when thirsty, bit in.

    We wanted to mend the hose... usually easy... but a hose mender was not readily available for that size... only 5/8".

    Yes, they CLAIM to work with 3/4, but they didn't.

  • cearbhaill (zone 6b Eastern Kentucky)
    9 years ago

    I bought a "Lifetime" hose years ago- can't remember the brand, I'd have to go to my filing cabinet to find out.
    Point is, we are very heavy hose users and it failed after several years and they replaced it. Then years later the replacement hose failed and they replaced that one as well.
    It's just a matter of keeping receipts.

    But now I find myself in need of a lighter weight hose.
    As Ken said long lengths of hose are heavy and I need 300 feet. I am currently using 3 100 footers strung together and I swear I feel like I am in a worlds strongest woman competition when I have to roll the thing up to mow or be neat. A couple of times I've done this at the end of a hard day and like to passed out with the sheer physical effort- I am no longer a spring chicken!

    Anything strong yet lighter?

  • ken_adrian Adrian MI cold Z5
    9 years ago

    hey chicken.. have you consider uncoupling them.. and letting them drain.. AND THEN PULLING THEM AROUND ...

    i fully understand the end of the day exhaustion and lack of clarity of thought ...

    but really .. water is heavy.. empty the hose..

    lol

    ken

  • natal
    9 years ago

    We have the longest length the hose reel will hold. I think that's 120 feet. Dh buys the heavy duty 5/8". I think the current two are Apex Professional.

    A good hose reel makes all the difference in the world. We have a Liberty and Ames. They're very similar.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Ames wall mounted aluminum hose reel

  • Marie Tulin
    9 years ago

    Speaking of uncoupling hoses, who uses those snap in "instant connectors.?" If they work and last, they would also save time and effort in multiple shorter hoses connections.

  • natal
    9 years ago

    We have the instant connectors on the hoses, nozzles, and all the sprinklers. No screwing. I love it!

  • diggerdee zone 6 CT
    9 years ago

    Gee, IMO, uncoupling the hoses and then dragging them around would be even MORE work! I'd rather just put a little more oomph into pulling them all together.

    But then again, I guess I cheat a bit. I pull the hoses out, drag them where I need them, and just leave them wherever I finish. Why put it back if I only have to drag it out again? Sometimes it does get pulled back and coiled by whoever is mowing the lawn, but then I just pull it out again and leave it. I do have to pull it from one area to the other, but all my gardening areas are far from the house, so I never drag the hose back to the house area; I just leave it near the last bed I was watering.

    I just make sure to check that no connections are laying in the driveway. DH once drove over a connnection and ruined two hoses in one instant.

    Dee

  • Rick Bain
    14 days ago

    I hate how the black rubber hoses leach the black onto your hands. Is there something you can coat the hose with that will prevent this?

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    13 days ago

    My black rubber hose puts marks on anythng it rubs up against, but I haven't had black on my hands. I ruined more clay pots trying to pull the hose past one and catching it. I finally got smart and bought black pots to put in the areas that are most in the line of fire and that has been a relief.


    I would think a coating on the hose itself would be problematic? Wouldn't that rub off onto everything too?

  • Rick Bain
    13 days ago

    Yesterday I used an acrylic exterior spray paint and painted one of them, we will see if that holds up. It looks good so far, but I didn't primer it so not sure how well it will last.

  • yeonassky
    13 days ago

    Hope the painting helps.


    If not you might have to get into the habit of wearing washable gloves. I have just found rubber hoses leave their mark. I have resorted to that personally. Took me a while to get into the habit though as I'm a bare hand gardener.

  • Rick Bain
    12 days ago

    I know what you mean. I mainly use the hoses to wash my car and whether or not I wear gloves the black gets into the wash bucket and onto the car. So I painted a hose yesterday with enamel spray paint and will see how it holds up. The can I started with ran out and couldn't find same color but at least I can test the concept. That's why you see two different colors. It feels very nice and I like the look much better than the black. I included a picture showing what they both look like. Paint the other one today (one color, lol) Thanks for your insight.



Sponsored
Longhouse Architects
Average rating: 5 out of 5 stars4 Reviews
Loudoun County's Prominent Architecture Firm Creating Cohesive Designs